MEETING REPORT / FLASHBACK PART IV / NFA / ASMAC MAY 4th / EVENTS

April 30th, 2016

I. LOCAL 47 MEMBERSHIP MEETING REPORT
II. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART IV - VIDEO GAMES and TRICKS
III. NFA FLUTE SCHOLARSHIP
IV ASMAC FEATURES WOMEN COMPOSERS
V. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

***** LOCAL 47 MEETING THIS MONDAY at 7:30 PM *****

===============================

I. LOCAL 47 MEMBERSHIP MEETING REPORT

Quorum not reached as of 7:32 pm

Actor’s Fund presented to the members.
National Human Resources Organization

Fund is to help Everyone in performing arts and entertainment
33 million operating budget.
9000 members across the country.
Board includes 50 leaders of the creative community.
134 years old.

Eligible – Services are available to everyone.
Only affordable housing and financial assistance have requirements…
must follow government guidelines.

Four main areas of services:
Social Services and Emergency Assistance
Health Care and Health insurance information
Employment and training
Housing

Online: actorsfund.org for more info
AHIRC. Org – health care

5757 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 400, LA, CA 90036 / Actorsfund.org.

————————————————-

No quorum as of 7:40.
Quorum reached as of 7:45

Roll taken.

No 50 year pin presentations.
Minutes approved.

RESOLUTIONS VOTE ON:

RESOLUTION I – Requires a comprehensive and balanced budget by
December 1st of each year.

You can see the text in the last Overture.

Member Huckins (One of the authors) spoke in favor.
In the past the budget hasn’t been due till May of each year. That
means that they’re not accountable till 4 months after when they
should be. As of now Money gets spent that the board doesn’t
know about. Must be done before the new year to make sense.

Monthly the executive board must review and balance what they’re
spending compared to what they’re making.

We had deficit spending for 7 years to the tune of 1.6 million
dollars.
-Must align budget year with fiscal year.

LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE SPEAKS
Legislative committee says (big surprise) recommends a vote no.
Focuses on two major areas, current board it relies on audited budget
figures presented in March. Could force the board to create a lame duck
board.

Requiring a balanced budget is not in the members best interests.
[EC: What???,... but unrestricted deficit spending is?.
Local could be required to deficit spend in cases of lawsuits or other issues.

No vote is in best interest of the membership.

MEMBER Castillo – I’ve looked at 40 financial reports. It makes no
common sense that the requirement is currently May with the fiscal
year beginning in January.

Legislative Committee did not publish an opinion in the overture
which is custom of practice…. And they should have. What are they hiding.
Over 1.6 million too much, we needed various things that could have been
paid for with that money,.. and then perhaps not have to sell the building.

MEMBER AUTHOR – Inspiration for the resolution came form the AFM bylaws.
COMM fails to propose a multi-year budget plan. Is it appropriate to have a
tendency toward deficit spending when there is no financial crisis.
The budget is your guide line to prevent deficit spending.

BOARD MEMBER (TRUSTEE) – Understands the desire to change the timing
of the budget and fiscal year, however, due to the things the legislative
states, it would make more sense to change to fiscal year. Says that the
fiscal year for non-profits is July.
MEMBER corrects the speaker “It’s not true”.

New board has not been in deficit spending. Some thing they cannot help
as in work flow, etc.

MEMBER CHAIRMAN – Discussed resolution with one of the authors of
the resolution. Why didn’t we put word out? There was too much going
on and it would have looks bad for the local while they’re trying to sell
the building. And if anything happened they might have to retract.

MEMBER – Concerned about having a budget, fearful of strait jacketing the
Local. Seems that wrongdoing has been intimated. If there’s a strike we have
to spend money. Has not heard about spending not being handled
responsibility [1.6 million in deficit spending is responsible?]

MEMBER AUTHOR – There need to be boundaries, if not there’s bound
to be a downward spiral. You can define your fiscal year however you
want, but Labor organizations are typically in January.

Ended year in a $30,000 deficit.

DIRECTOR – The $30,000 deficit is down from over $400,000.
The most deficit spending happened in 2013.

MEMBER AUTHOR – All members of the board are fiduciaries, that
means we have to trust them. There is no adherence to a budget,
without a legal budget no one and nothing can be held accountable.
We’re not suppose to lose money.

MEMBER – Numbers are perspective, budget. Want to be able to help members
in an emergency. We’re all a family, should have to answer to how we use it.
My main is how we look at the numbers.

MEMBER AUTHOR- Must dispel misunderstanding about budgets. Exec board
controls the budget. One or more board members don’t understand that.

DIRECTOR – Vote no, it’s not addressing the true issues. A new section about
a budget revue would be a good idea. Also a multi year budget would be a good
idea.

All the usual suspects and those who benefit from the present system spoke
against the resolution. Those more interested in more accountability and spending
controls spoke in favor the resolution.

DIRECTOR CALLED THE QUESTION.

Final VOTE
10 for a required budget.
40 against a required budget.

[EC: So most in attendance see nothing wrong with leaving the board
free to deficit spend with little to no accountability. See why you need
to come to meetings?]

———————————–

RESOLUTION II
Bi-annual election info – print version is only quarterly. Changes notices of election
material, create special election edition. See details online.

MEMBER DELEGATE – There’s too much in the resolution. Without knowing
the details. Bring it back and divide it up and vote on each section separately.

SECRETARY – Explains details – purely housekeeping. Overture only published
4 times a year, so we need to change printing dates in election year to print
special edition in November.

YES – 48
NO - 2

———————————–

RESOLUTION III – Requires notices to meetings be mailed by postcard and email.
Only 2/3’s of members have an email, so notice of meeting must be sent, since
the overture is only printed 4 times a year.

MEMBER – Section listing is wrong, should be Section 5, not Section 1. It’s a typo.
What if notice needs info that is longer than can be on a postcard?
Answer – The correspondence should be sent in whatever form it needs to be.
Biggest concern is that people get the notice.

MEMBER – Was section one accepted as a correction? Article I, sec. 5 was corrected.
Internet security isn’t really an issue is it? We’re not sending classified info.

MEMBER – Substitute “due notice” where it says “postcard”. Motion made and 2nded.
Motion carries.

MEMBER – Wording sounds optional, not required, so notice would note necc. be
gotten in time. So, I have a problem that it says MAY be given what ever days before,
instead of “MUST” be. The whole thing looks questionable.

MEMBER – Member moves the word MUST replace the word “may”
MEMBER – “May” is only a choice of whether it’s a email or letter.
MEMBER – If you say “May”, people might not understand what “May” means
or what they’re supposed to receive.

PARLIAMENT – If you say “must” it can only be sent by email
MEMBER – Due notice must be sent to members either by email or snail mail.
Parlementarian says that’s redundant.

Vote on amendment. Fails.

VOTES TAKEN

YES – 48
NO - 4

SALARY REVIEW BOARD ELECTION (need 5)

ELECTION CHAIR collects names
Greg Huckins -
Paul Castillo -
Marie Matson - Elected
Mark Zimaski - Elected
Paul Sternhagen - Elected
Stephen Green - Elected
Dr. Norman Ludwin – Elected

Electing five new members

Some nominees speak – They meet and decide on
the salaries of all those who are paid by the local.

MEMBER – When I was on the board the only ones
reviewed were the board members.

NOMINEE – Had lots of assignments in different capacities.
All salaries are reviewed and that is important. Also
have background in financial obligations.

Ballots collected.

—————-

ELECTION BOARD (need 7)
Steven Green
Paul Sternhagen –
Mark Zimoski
Marie Matson
Khris Mettala
Scott Higgins
Nick Stone

Ballots collected.

ALL WERE ACCEPTED BY BALLOT

Secretary will check to ensure all those nominated are eligible
to run. (No suspensions or lapse in membership)

—————-

OFFICE REPORTS
President - 2015 recap:
24 CBAs
Grievances – filing and following – Mediation used more these days. – 13 grievances –
10 were withdrawn, 1 scheduled for the future. One carryover from 2015.
MEMBER – Point of info – mediator was used once.
Relief Fund – 29 members helped.
Trust fund - 67 concerts
13,000 contracts

2016 so far
Negotiated with 12 employers
9 completed
Grievances 6 – 3 withdrawn, 1 resolved.
Relief fund – 10 members helped.
145 Concerts sponsored so far this year.
El Capitan - 10% increase over three years.
Desert Symphony – 9% over three years.
TV Show “Transparent” organized.

BUILDING
Building going into escrow with Cadence for 25 million. (3rd attempt)
Entering into Escrow on Alameda Property (this week)
When due diligence is done renovations will commence
Comm meeting with architects to beginning site planning process.

Looking to create Music Tax Credit.

Health – Potential merger of plans
Milliman engaged study underway
Report due back in May.

AMF Convention – June 2016
Negotiate ongoing Phamplet B and SLRA
AFM Live TV Nego coming up.

No resolutions sponsored by delegate of directors but did endorse one by ICSOM.

————–

VP Report –
Many negotiations done.
Spoke at 8 different colleges and really enjoying it.
8 folks joined from those presentations.
Attended writer’s guide awards - Reno conference - ASCAP music awards
ASMAC 1st Wednesdays - Low Budget Workshop
LAPD Health and Safety Fair for LGBT in Auditorium

————–

SECRETARY REPORT

DIRECTOR – Can we defer remaining officer report to go to New Business.

Order changed…

NEW BUSINESS - THE PLEASANT SURPRISE OF THE NIGHT
1) MEMBER PRESENTED MOTION – Whereas Local 47 members have no clue how
many times VG agreement has been used, et…….

Local 47 shall publish the total music wages and hours for Local 47
members for VG work 2006-2015 segmented by year.

Members need to see the success or lack thereof of the VG Agreement.

Motioned and seconded –

OFFICER: Concern that employers would see the info,.. could we put it in the
member’s section.

AUTHOR: Would be willing to have it put into member’s only area as long as
members are informed to look for it.

MEMBER – Print in overture that it’s in the member’s section
MEMBER – It’s a national agreement – shouldn’t it be for work of all AFM
member, not just Local 47
MEMBER – Cannot encroach on questioning the motive of the member.
Shall post in the member’s area of the Local 47 website and in the next
printed Overture the info requested. Any AFM member should be able to
get this info. Should not have to make request and jump through hoops
to get it.
MEMBER – Is the effort to compare previous contract with the present one?
These contracts should be like 2 pages, should be readable and useable.
Shouldn’t be member’s only, the info needs to be out.

A lot of these contracts are not being used.

MEMBERS – This is in everyone’s best interest,… please vote for it. We
should all have it readily available. I want it in member’s area by June 1st,
and the print edition after that.

Resolution passed.

2) Bind delegates to oppose any increased in federation work dues or per
capita increase.

+++ It’s interesting to note, that, unsolicited, President Acosta said, “Yes, the
recording musicians pay too much dues. The very next speaker had to correct
him, saying, Everyone is paying too much in dues, not just recording musicians
(This certainly showed, once again, that President Acosta is in the tank for the RMA.)

MEMBER – Delegates should actively oppose the increases.
MEMBER- Don’t like the idea of binding the delegates, they should vote
as they feel they should. Is a ballot motion to bind the delegates.

Since due notice should be given, the maker of the motion withdraws
the motion of binding the delegates.

Quorum Lost –
Member Statement Delegates should all actively oppose any dues increases.

MEETING ADJOURNED AT 10:08

======================================

II. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART V - NEW YORK AND ELSEWHERE

Allegro – Volume CV No. 1 January, 2005
Local 802, New York City

Lights, Camera, Action! Making More Movies in New York

When you think of making movies, Los Angeles is the first city that probably comes to
mind. But Local 802 hopes to make you think of both Los Angeles and New York.

A new City Council bill would create a 5 percent city tax credit for film producers doing
certain types of film production work in New York City (including soundtrack recordings).
The bill would complement recently passed state legislation allowing a 10 percent tax
credit for similar work done in New York State.

As reported in last month’s Allegro, film studios are starting to use subtle methods to get
around soundtrack recording. So any piece of legislation that encourages legitimate
studio production in New York could benefit New York recording musicians.

The bill is Intro 454-A. 802 member Roger Blanc testified to City Council on Dec. 1 in
support of the bill. Blanc is vice president of the New York chapter of the Recording
Musicians Association as well as second vice president of the international RMA.

The transcript is below.
Ladies and gentlemen: My name is Roger Blanc and I’m a New York City-based
freelance musician and vice president on the local and international boards of the
Recording Musicians Association. Thank you for this opportunity to speak on
behalf of New York City recording musicians.

The Recording Musicians Association boards I sit on represent the interests of
musicians recording in the fields of film, television, records and advertising.

Our organization is what’s known as a “player conference” to our union, the American
Federation of Musicians, and our activities affect the working conditions of recording
musicians across the United States and in parts of Canada.

Due to a variety of economic and technological factors, musicians working in the
recording field have in recent years suffered substantial professional challenges.

As these challenges apply to the New York City film business, the City has seen a
significant across-the-board reduction in film music soundtrack recording activity over
the past ten years.

Statistics over this ten-year period show the number of New York City film soundtrack
recording sessions per year cut in half, the total number of musicians employed in this
field per year cut in half, and the amount of total wages paid to recording musicians in a
given year cut by more than 60 percent net of wage increases over the term.

New York City musicians face competition from Los Angeles, where the film studios
and their related production infrastructure help to assure some degree of regular
employment in this field.

We face competition from non-union recording venues, both in the U.S. and abroad.
We face competition from the former Eastern Bloc countries, many of whom are home
to musicians willing to work for substantially lower wages than their counterparts in the
U.S., Canada, and Western Europe.

Finally, we compete with many other high-powered industries for the precious real
estate which is required to house recording studios here. Many of our best studios have
been forced out of business by the high costs of Manhattan property.

The current trend in film soundtracks favors the licensing of pre-existing hit songs over
the recording of original new soundtrack music. A variety of newer electronic musical
options allow for the number of musicians employed in a given film to be substantially
reduced in many instances where new music is recorded. Prerecorded music libraries
may be licensed in lieu of creating and recording original new music for films here. In
short, New York City film soundtrack recording is an area of activity which could
certainly use the promotion that the production incentives in this legislation would
provide.

Thank you for your time.
Roger Blanc, Local 802

—————

Seattle has been a hotbed of film, TV and video game recording since Seattle
Symphony musicians voted to decertify the AFM in 1988. Seattle musicians then
started courting film scoring work, creating a rampant and popular non-union
environment for film producers. Below is advertising from the websites of Seattle
Music (David Sabee) and contractor Simon James:

[EC: Their list of credits is substantially larger now, 10 years later.]

SeattleMusic.com
From its auspicious debut scoring Mr. Holland’s Opus and Die Hard
with a Vengeance for Michael Kaman, to this spring’s scores for Lake
Placid, The Astronaut’s Wife, Love Letters, The Limey, Castle in the
Sky, Atomic Train, and Six Pack, SEATTLEMUSIC continues to build
on its success as a world class film scoring orchestra.

Superior musicians, music preparation and engineering services,
conductors, orchestrators, recording studios and mobile trucks are
combined for a growing stream of projects. As successful team
creation is of paramount importance, SEATTLEMUSIC is your one
stop source for musical services. The combination of superb
musicianship, experienced management and a buyout for all media
has established SEATTLEMUSIC at the forefront of the film scoring
industry.

—————

SimonJamesMusic.com

Simon James, Northwest Sinfonia contracts with the Pacific
Northwest’s finest musicians, ensuring that your orchestral recording
experience will be your very best. Regardless of style or idiom, Simon
will find the perfect performers for your project. See why many
satisfied clients continue to return for the friendly atmosphere and
foremost musical excellence at reasonable rates. Never any extra
charge for new use!

Completed scores recorded, as represented on this website include:
• 100 motion pictures
• 45 CD’s and Video Games
• 58 TV
• 14 IMAX

—————–

Eastern Europe and London recording orchestras and environments,
as advertised and represented by the Tadlow Music Agency
(see www.praguephilharmonic.org):

Through our 20 years experience of dealing with musicians,
technicians and studios Tadlow Music is able to offer complete, or
separate element, recording packages in London. Because we are
totally independent and not affiliated to any one organisation we are
able to offer the most flexible choice of orchestras and studios.
Included in our packages are the services of:

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
The world renowned ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA, through
Tadlow Music, are available for recording sessions in London.

Formed in 1946 by Sir Thomas Beecham the RPO has the enviable
reputation as being one of the most experienced recording orchestras
in the world. Their repertoire encompasses all the major classical
works with as well as a host of “crossover recordings” and Original
Film and TV Soundtracks.

Their most recent soundtrack recording was for ARSENE LUPIN -
music composed and conducted by Debbie Wiseman

Other Soundtrack Credits include
MAURICE JARRE’s Oscar(R) winning score for A PASSAGE TO INDIA
and his scores for MAD MAX: BEYOND THUNDERDOME THE BRIDE
TOP SECRET & THE MESSAGE (Oscar(R) nominated)
plus
GREYSTOKE - JOHN SCOTT
MOUNTBATTEN - JOHN SCOTT
EYE OF THE NEEDLE - MIKLOS ROZSA
TIME AFTER TIME - MIKLOS ROZSA
RELATIVE VALUES - JOHN DEBNEY
FIVE DAYS ONE SUMMER - ELMER BERNSTEIN
AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON - ELMER BERNSTEIN

Confirming their role as “Britain’s National Orchestra” the RPO and the
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC CONCERT ORCHESTRA are famous for their
versatility in both recordings and concerts and their “lighter”
repertoire includes albums with SARAH BRIGHTMAN, PLACIDO
DIMINGO, DIONNE WARWICK, JOSE CARRERAS, CHARLOTTE CHURCH
and RUSSELL WATSON as well as symphonic arrangements of the
music of QUEEN, U2, MADONNA, DEEP PURPLE, ELTON JOHN and the
popular HOOKED ON CLASSICS series.

For more information, please contact tadlowmusic@hotmail.com
The Pro Arte Orchestra
“The quality of top musicians in London is legendary and the players
(of the Pro Arte Orchestra) are among the best in the world” -
Composer, Jim Parker

NEXT TIME - PART VI - MORE FOREIGN OPTIONS IN 2005

================================

III. NFA FLUTE SCHOLARSHIP
 
Each year, the Frances Blaisdell Convention Scholarship provides financial
assistance for a high school or undergraduate flutist to attend the National
Flute Association Convention. Recipients gain the means to attend the
largest annual flute event in the world and the chance to participate in
an enriching, immersive experience with renowned flute performers and
ensembles from across the globe.

The recipient of this scholarship will receive $750 to attend the NFA’s
44th Annual Convention in San Diego this summer, plus complimentary
convention registration, and a one-year membership to the NFA. This
is a great opportunity for a flute student to gain insight, inspiration, and
connections to further their flute musicianship and career.

The Frances Blaisdell Convention Scholarship is open to full-time
students under the age of 25. Applicants cannot be previous recipients
of the scholarship.

If you are not eligible to apply, please share this information with students,
colleagues, friends, and anyone who might want to attend the convention,
but currently lacks the financial means to do so.

Applications are due May 1. Visit the Frances Blaisdell Scholarship page
to learn more about the opportunity or submit an application.  
 
Victoria Pampe
Membership Manager
National Flute Association
70 E. Lake Street, Suite 200
Chicago, IL 60601
312-332-6682 (office)
312-332-6684 (fax)
vpampe@nfaonline.org

===============================

IV. ASMAC FEATURES WOMEN COMPOSERS

ASMAC’S FIRST WEDNESDAYS

WOMEN COMPOSERS FEATURE

Wednesday May 4, 2016 - 7 PM 
featuring Music by Women Composers including
Carolyn Yarnell
Maria Newman
Nan Schwartz
Susan Hurley
Elise Michelle
Penka Kouneza
Marlene Hajdu
Bonnie Janofsky
Mae Crosby
Asuka Ito
Performers will include
Sally Stevens
Leslie A. Soultanian
Bryan Pezzone
Scott C. Hosfeld
Paula Hochhalter
Ben Powell
Michael Stever
Please come out!
$10 for Guests and Students
FREE for ASMAC & Local 47 members
Free parking.
Meet-up & Check-in: 7:00-7:30 PM.
Program: 7:30-10:00 PM.
PLEASE NOTE LOCATION:
AFM Local 47 - Auditorium
817 Vine St.
Hollywood, CA 90038
* ASMAC Members who would like to share music at a
FIRST WEDNESDAYS event,
Contact info@asmac.org Attn: Milton Nelson

___________
Check out the ASMAC website - www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview DVD’s in the ASMAC store (Van Alexander, Ray Charles, Johnny Mandel, Jorge Calandrelli, Bill Ross, Jack Feierman, Sammy Nestico and more), to download ASMAC luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 
Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL

===============================

Read the rest of this entry »

FLASHBACK PART IV / SCHOLARSHIP / CALANDRELLI MASTERCLASS / EVENTS

April 23rd, 2016

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART IV - VIDEO GAMES and TRICKS
II. NFA FLUTE SCHOLARSHIP
III. ASMAC JORGE CALANDRELLI MASTERCLASS
IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

***** LOCAL 47 MEETING THIS MONDAY at 7:30 PM *****

===============================

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART V - NEW YORK AND ELSEWHERE

Allegro – Volume CV No. 1 January, 2005
Local 802, New York City

Lights, Camera, Action! Making More Movies in New York

When you think of making movies, Los Angeles is the first city that probably comes to
mind. But Local 802 hopes to make you think of both Los Angeles and New York.

A new City Council bill would create a 5 percent city tax credit for film producers doing
certain types of film production work in New York City (including soundtrack recordings).
The bill would complement recently passed state legislation allowing a 10 percent tax
credit for similar work done in New York State.

As reported in last month’s Allegro, film studios are starting to use subtle methods to get
around soundtrack recording. So any piece of legislation that encourages legitimate
studio production in New York could benefit New York recording musicians.

The bill is Intro 454-A. 802 member Roger Blanc testified to City Council on Dec. 1 in
support of the bill. Blanc is vice president of the New York chapter of the Recording
Musicians Association as well as second vice president of the international RMA.

The transcript is below.
Ladies and gentlemen: My name is Roger Blanc and I’m a New York City-based
freelance musician and vice president on the local and international boards of the
Recording Musicians Association. Thank you for this opportunity to speak on
behalf of New York City recording musicians.

The Recording Musicians Association boards I sit on represent the interests of
musicians recording in the fields of film, television, records and advertising.

Our organization is what’s known as a “player conference” to our union, the American
Federation of Musicians, and our activities affect the working conditions of recording
musicians across the United States and in parts of Canada.

Due to a variety of economic and technological factors, musicians working in the
recording field have in recent years suffered substantial professional challenges.

As these challenges apply to the New York City film business, the City has seen a
significant across-the-board reduction in film music soundtrack recording activity over
the past ten years.

Statistics over this ten-year period show the number of New York City film soundtrack
recording sessions per year cut in half, the total number of musicians employed in this
field per year cut in half, and the amount of total wages paid to recording musicians in a
given year cut by more than 60 percent net of wage increases over the term.

New York City musicians face competition from Los Angeles, where the film studios
and their related production infrastructure help to assure some degree of regular
employment in this field.

We face competition from non-union recording venues, both in the U.S. and abroad.
We face competition from the former Eastern Bloc countries, many of whom are home
to musicians willing to work for substantially lower wages than their counterparts in the
U.S., Canada, and Western Europe.

Finally, we compete with many other high-powered industries for the precious real
estate which is required to house recording studios here. Many of our best studios have
been forced out of business by the high costs of Manhattan property.

The current trend in film soundtracks favors the licensing of pre-existing hit songs over
the recording of original new soundtrack music. A variety of newer electronic musical
options allow for the number of musicians employed in a given film to be substantially
reduced in many instances where new music is recorded. Prerecorded music libraries
may be licensed in lieu of creating and recording original new music for films here. In
short, New York City film soundtrack recording is an area of activity which could
certainly use the promotion that the production incentives in this legislation would
provide.

Thank you for your time.
Roger Blanc, Local 802

—————

Seattle has been a hotbed of film, TV and video game recording since Seattle
Symphony musicians voted to decertify the AFM in 1988. Seattle musicians then
started courting film scoring work, creating a rampant and popular non-union
environment for film producers. Below is advertising from the websites of Seattle
Music (David Sabee) and contractor Simon James:

[EC: Their list of credits is substantially larger now, 10 years later.]

SeattleMusic.com
From its auspicious debut scoring Mr. Holland’s Opus and Die Hard
with a Vengeance for Michael Kaman, to this spring’s scores for Lake
Placid, The Astronaut’s Wife, Love Letters, The Limey, Castle in the
Sky, Atomic Train, and Six Pack, SEATTLEMUSIC continues to build
on its success as a world class film scoring orchestra.

Superior musicians, music preparation and engineering services,
conductors, orchestrators, recording studios and mobile trucks are
combined for a growing stream of projects. As successful team
creation is of paramount importance, SEATTLEMUSIC is your one
stop source for musical services. The combination of superb
musicianship, experienced management and a buyout for all media
has established SEATTLEMUSIC at the forefront of the film scoring
industry.

—————

SimonJamesMusic.com

Simon James, Northwest Sinfonia contracts with the Pacific
Northwest’s finest musicians, ensuring that your orchestral recording
experience will be your very best. Regardless of style or idiom, Simon
will find the perfect performers for your project. See why many
satisfied clients continue to return for the friendly atmosphere and
foremost musical excellence at reasonable rates. Never any extra
charge for new use!

Completed scores recorded, as represented on this website include:
• 100 motion pictures
• 45 CD’s and Video Games
• 58 TV
• 14 IMAX

—————–

Eastern Europe and London recording orchestras and environments,
as advertised and represented by the Tadlow Music Agency
(see www.praguephilharmonic.org):

Through our 20 years experience of dealing with musicians,
technicians and studios Tadlow Music is able to offer complete, or
separate element, recording packages in London. Because we are
totally independent and not affiliated to any one organisation we are
able to offer the most flexible choice of orchestras and studios.
Included in our packages are the services of:

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
The world renowned ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA, through
Tadlow Music, are available for recording sessions in London.

Formed in 1946 by Sir Thomas Beecham the RPO has the enviable
reputation as being one of the most experienced recording orchestras
in the world. Their repertoire encompasses all the major classical
works with as well as a host of “crossover recordings” and Original
Film and TV Soundtracks.

Their most recent soundtrack recording was for ARSENE LUPIN -
music composed and conducted by Debbie Wiseman

Other Soundtrack Credits include
MAURICE JARRE’s Oscar(R) winning score for A PASSAGE TO INDIA
and his scores for MAD MAX: BEYOND THUNDERDOME THE BRIDE
TOP SECRET & THE MESSAGE (Oscar(R) nominated)
plus
GREYSTOKE - JOHN SCOTT
MOUNTBATTEN - JOHN SCOTT
EYE OF THE NEEDLE - MIKLOS ROZSA
TIME AFTER TIME - MIKLOS ROZSA
RELATIVE VALUES - JOHN DEBNEY
FIVE DAYS ONE SUMMER - ELMER BERNSTEIN
AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON - ELMER BERNSTEIN

Confirming their role as “Britain’s National Orchestra” the RPO and the
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC CONCERT ORCHESTRA are famous for their
versatility in both recordings and concerts and their “lighter”
repertoire includes albums with SARAH BRIGHTMAN, PLACIDO
DIMINGO, DIONNE WARWICK, JOSE CARRERAS, CHARLOTTE CHURCH
and RUSSELL WATSON as well as symphonic arrangements of the
music of QUEEN, U2, MADONNA, DEEP PURPLE, ELTON JOHN and the
popular HOOKED ON CLASSICS series.

For more information, please contact tadlowmusic@hotmail.com
The Pro Arte Orchestra
“The quality of top musicians in London is legendary and the players
(of the Pro Arte Orchestra) are among the best in the world” -
Composer, Jim Parker

NEXT TIME - PART VI - MORE FOREIGN OPTIONS IN 2005

================================

II. NFA FLUTE SCHOLARSHIP
 
Each year, the Frances Blaisdell Convention Scholarship provides financial
assistance for a high school or undergraduate flutist to attend the National
Flute Association Convention. Recipients gain the means to attend the
largest annual flute event in the world and the chance to participate in
an enriching, immersive experience with renowned flute performers and
ensembles from across the globe.

The recipient of this scholarship will receive $750 to attend the NFA’s
44th Annual Convention in San Diego this summer, plus complimentary
convention registration, and a one-year membership to the NFA. This
is a great opportunity for a flute student to gain insight, inspiration, and
connections to further their flute musicianship and career.

The Frances Blaisdell Convention Scholarship is open to full-time
students under the age of 25. Applicants cannot be previous recipients
of the scholarship.

If you are not eligible to apply, please share this information with students,
colleagues, friends, and anyone who might want to attend the convention,
but currently lacks the financial means to do so.

Applications are due May 1. Visit the Frances Blaisdell Scholarship page
to learn more about the opportunity or submit an application.  
 
Victoria Pampe
Membership Manager
National Flute Association
70 E. Lake Street, Suite 200
Chicago, IL 60601
312-332-6682 (office)
312-332-6684 (fax)
vpampe@nfaonline.org

===============================

III ASMAC JORGE CALANDRELLI MASTERCLASS

ASMAC Master Class with Jorge Calandrelli
Moderated by Sylvester Rivers

Note Location @
LOS ANGELES VALLEY COLLEGE

Saturday, April 30, 2016 @ 11:00am

Award winning composer/arranger/producer/conductor
Jorge Calandrelli
Moderated by:  Sylvester Rivers
 
“Ballads to Bossa:
Arranging Across Different Styles.”

Jorge Calandrelli will share his arranging, production and recording techniques through projected scores, real-time audio, commentary and questions and answers.  Jorge will detail his methods for successfully crossing different musical styles and genres, while maintaining individuality and musical integrity.  He will discuss planning the form of an arrangement, intro, interlude and ending, overture and prelude as an alternate form of intro, as well as sketching demos for basic ideas, etc.  The Master Class will include setting the mood and the groove of a theme, development of motifs – key changes – climax, instrumental arranging and arranging for vocals, and more.  Special bonus materials will be provided to all attendees.
 

Jorge Calandrelli is a 6 Time Grammy Winner, with 2 Oscar Nominations, 
27 Grammy Nominations, and was recipient of the 2014 ASMAC Golden
Score Award, among other prestigious awards.

Most recent is Jorge’s involvement on the new album ”Cheek to Cheek” 
with Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga where he arranged and conducted all
orchestral arrangements, as well as the “Great Performances” live show
conducted for PBS at the Lincoln Center in New York which aired on the
heels of the album release. Upon completion of the Duets II album,
 Jorge reached a significant achievement celebrating a 25-year association
with the timeless Tony Bennett, which includes, thirteen recorded albums,
six Grammy Nominations and two Grammy Awards won.

The album “Amore Infinito” produced and arranged for Placido Domingo 
and the LSO by Maestro Calandrelli with original songs and lyrics by Pope 
John Paul II has been re-released by Sony Classical this year to commemorate
the Popes canonization.  The album contains duets by Josh Groban,
Katherine Jenkins, Andrea Bocelli, Vanessa Williams and Placido Domingo Jr.
as well as some original songs by Calandrelli.

Additionally, he worked as Executive Musical Director for The Concord Music
Group for three years.  Mr. Calandrelli continues to work independently with
a wide diversity of artists and projects as well as working on his concert pieces.
Jorge’s passion for music includes young musicians and music education. 
Mr. Calandrelli currently serves on the Advisory Board for ASMAC, as well as
having served on the Board of Governors of NARAS.

MODERATOR:  SYLVESTER RIVERS

Composer, arranger and pianist Sylvester Rivers has recorded with numerous
hit artists including Lionel Richie, Diana Ross, The Jacksons, Sammy Davis, Jr.,
Dionne Warwick, Nancy Wilson, Kenny Rogers, Johnny Mathis, Aretha Franklin,
New Edition, Smokey Robinson, The Temptations, Gladys Knight & The Pips,
Barry White, Marc Bolan & T. Rex, Ray Parker, Jr. & Raydio, Deniece Williams,
The Fifth Dimension and many others.

Composing, arranging and orchestrating for television and film, as well,
such as the television series, “Fame,” songs for the Kevin Bacon/ Laurence
Fishburne film, “Quicksilver,” “Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo,” “The Arsenio
Hall Show” and numerous others, he has been prolific in producing music
throughout a wide spectrum.

___________
Check out the ASMAC website - www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview DVD’s in the ASMAC store (Van Alexander, Ray Charles, Johnny Mandel, Jorge Calandrelli, Bill Ross, Jack Feierman, Sammy Nestico and more), to download ASMAC luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 
Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL

===============================
Read the rest of this entry »

FLASHBACK PART IV / NFA SCHOLARSHIP / DAVID BLACK LUNCHEON / EVENTS

April 16th, 2016

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART IV - VIDEO GAMES and TRICKS
II. NFA FLUTE SCHOLARSHIP
III ASMAC DAVID BLACK LUNCHEON
IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

===============================

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART IV - VIDEO GAMES and TRICKS

Immediately following the Video Game Conference in Los Angeles
on December 6, 2004, a manager of composers for film,
video games, sent a pleading e-mail to attendees (RMA members,
video game executives, composers) of the Conference to consider
the volume of recording work that has left and to take urgent action
to change to contracts to help keep the work under AFM agreements.

Written on December 9, 2004, this manager’s letter is reprinted in its
entirety.

AF of M Video Game Agreement:

When I started (Business Name) 12 years ago, my sister
(music contractor) —– ——— and many of my friends
in Local 47 were excited about the potential of doing music
for games. My friends at Sony, Warner Bros. and Paramount
scoring stages were excited about the potential. My friends
in the music preparation business were excited about the
potential. And, for sure, I and every composer I managed
were excited about the potential of working with Local 47
musicians.

During these past 12 years, the composers I manage have
scored about 4 games in LA with Local 47 musicians and
about 85 games in Seattle and other places throughout
the world.

Assuming the 85 games took 9 hours each to score,
that’s 765 hours of work/$$$ per musician.

Why did we take 85 gigs away from the LA sound stages
and music prep people? Why did we take 765 hours of
work/$$$ away from the Local 47 musicians?

During these past 12 years, my musician friends in Local
47 have stated;

“I’m not concerned about some potential extra backend
pennies tomorrow.”

“I need to work today to feed my family today.”

“I need the hours today so I can get insurance/H & W
for my family today.”

If only 1 more game had been scored with Local 47 musicians
this past year, there would be (let’s say) 60 Local 47 families
with an additional $600.00 or more to enjoy the upcoming
holidays with.

Some “Fat Cats” might say ‘I don’t need no stinkin $600.00.’
However, I feel there are many Local 47 families that could use
the $600.00 to put the word “Happy” with the word Holidays.

I hope the above compels a sense of urgency. I am not
suggesting to compromise what is justified future income.
I am urging the powers to be to act smart and swift so that
the next 12 years is not a repeat of the past 12 years.

I wish you all “Happy” Holidays.

Regards,
(Manager)

FBI four bars intertainment www.fourbarsintertainment.com
Award Winning composers who deliver great music on time
and within budget…

In addition to non-union and less expensive recording
alternatives, another contractual loophole that the film studios
are taking advantage of is discovered recently, as outlined below.
However, the result is creating more policing for the locals and
musicians themselves instead of altering the Motion Picture
Agreement language to close up these loopholes and eliminate
the “phono to motion picture” inequities.

—————–

Allegro – Volume CIV No. 12 December, 2004
Local 802, New York City

Movie Musicians Are New Target Studios Use Loophole to
Avoid Film Fund
by Jay Schaffner with Mikael Elsila

Major film studios have found a new way to cut their costs —
and take away money from musicians at the same time. The
new practice involves bypassing the AFM’s motion picture
agreement in at least two different ways.

The AFM called a special meeting in Los Angeles last month
to address the problem. 802 President David Lennon and
Recording Supervisor Jay Schaffner attended. Also in attendance
were officers from Local 47 (Los Angeles), Local 655 (Miami),
Local 257 (Nashville), Local 5 (Detroit), Local 149 (Toronto),
ICSOM and the RMA, along with legal counsel from the firm of
Bredhoff and Kaiser.

MAKING MONEY IN MOVIES

Traditionally, if you are a recording musician, you get paid in
at least two ways when you record for a movie under a union
contract. First is the recording session itself when you record
the movie soundtrack. The second is the money you receive
from the film fund (whose official title is the Film Musicians
Secondary Market Fund).

Your check from the film fund is proportional to how well your
film did in “secondary markets,” which include TV, videocassette,
DVD, pay cable and in-flight movies. (For films made for television,
secondary markets include DVD, in-flight and those rare cases
where a television film migrates to the big screen.)

The movie studios are trying to decrease the amount of money
they pay into the film fund. They are also trying to eliminate
musicians’ eligibility for earning film fund money.

Here’s how.

TRICKS OF THE TRADE
Movie studios are required under the AFM motion picture agreement
to pay 1 percent of all gross income on secondary product (like DVD’s)
into the film fund. This gets divided up by all the musicians who performed
on the music score.

However, movie studios are only required to pay into the film fund if
there was an “original scoring session” or sideline session. That language
is important, and that’s how studios are violating the spirit of the agreement.

An “original scoring session” refers to musicians sitting down to record
the score to a movie.

Instead, studios are hiring musicians far in advance of a movie’s production
to write original songs and other music. They are not telling musicians that
this music may appear in a movie some day — they are saying that this is
music for a sound recording (like a CD). But the music ends up in a movie.

Since the music was written before the movie was finalized, and since there
was technically no “original scoring session,” the film studios are able to
avoid paying any money into the film fund.

The musicians who perform on this music that ends up in the movie are
paid a “new use” payment, which is required under the AFM contract. But
even if the movie sells millions of DVD’s, the musicians won’t see a penny
from the film fund.

Let’s say a Marvin Gaye recording from 1973 ends up as the background
music for a new film. The original Marvin Gaye musicians will receive new
use payments since their music is now being used in a movie and the
original recording was done under a union contract. But they will not
receive any money from the film fund, even if the movie is the biggest
DVD seller of the year.

Or let’s say Paul Simon is commissioned to write new music that ends up
in a movie. But the music isn’t technically a “scoring session,” since the
music was written before the movie was finalized. In that case, Paul Simon
and his side musicians won’t receive any money from the film fund either.

ANOTHER TRICK

Another way studios are hurting musicians is an older method: they are
using musicians outside of the U.S. Thanks to digital technology and
the Internet, it’s relatively easy for studios to record music outside of
the country and bring it back in. Since these sessions are not recorded
under an AFM agreement, they don’t trigger film fund payments either.

For example, the music to the “Lord of the Rings” movies was recorded
by Howard Shore in London and was not filed under AFM contracts. These
musicians will not receive film fund payments.

A CASE STUDY

Let’s take the movie “Cold Mountain,” produced by Miramax in 2003.
There are at least three kinds of music in “Cold Mountain.” One is the
song “You Will Be My Ain True Love” by Alison Krauss, featuring Sting.

Because Miramax commissioned this song before the movie was finalized,
it is not considered a “studio scoring session.” And the side musicians who
performed on this track will not receive any money from the film fund,
even if “Cold Mountain” goes on to sell millions of DVD’s.

A second musical part of “Cold Mountain” is the actual underscoring.
Miramax outsourced this music to a country outside the U.S. and
therefore it is not covered by the AFM agreement. If the underscoring
music had been recorded in the U.S., the musicians would have been
eligible for film fund payments. (According to the AFM motion picture
agreement, a studio is generally required to score its movie in the U.S.
if the film is shot here and if the storyline is based on content from
our country. But “Cold Mountain” was actually shot in Romania and
therefore was not required to file the job in the U.S.)

Finally, “Cold Mountain” also utilizes traditional music to invoke the
Civil War. These vocal, guitar and folk tunes were recorded as nonunion
cash dates. Again, those musicians will not be able to collect film fund
payments.

WHY IS THIS HAPPENING?

Musicians like Alison Krauss and her side musicians are not doing
anything wrong. They may have no idea that their music is being used
by the movie studios to circumvent the film fund.

The film studios are doing this because it is an easy way for them to
pare down their expenses.

Studios don’t make most of their money on box office ticket sales.
Instead, the majority of profits are made on the “back end,” like DVD
profits or when the movie plays on TV. By getting around the film fund,
studios save big bucks on their back end payments to musicians.

WHAT THE UNION WILL DO

The meeting in Los Angeles to deal with this situation had several outcomes.

The AFM will make available to all locals a current list of movies
that are being scored. This list will include movies that are in production
and where we think the scoring is taking place. Recording musicians will
be able to look at this list and be alert to the fact that some sessions advertised
as “phono sessions” are really “scoring sessions,” which
should trigger film fund payments.

We will also try to monitor artists who have signed deals with studios
to write original songs. These songs may actually be a new kind of
scoring and, as such, should be considered scoring sessions. Musicians
on these sessions have a right to film fund payments.

Passing legislation to create local tax incentives is a step in the right
direction, but film producers are generally looking to save a minimum
of 10% on their production costs. Tax incentives and buyout options,
in addition to wages and fees paid in the local currency in foreign countries,
often amount to an average of 25% savings in overall production costs.
More lobbying for further incentives to keep productions in the U.S. is
necessary.

NEXT TIME: NEW YORK, SEATTLE and ELSEWHERE.

================================

II. NFA FLUTE SCHOLARSHIP
 
Each year, the Frances Blaisdell Convention Scholarship provides financial
assistance for a high school or undergraduate flutist to attend the National
Flute Association Convention. Recipients gain the means to attend the
largest annual flute event in the world and the chance to participate in
an enriching, immersive experience with renowned flute performers and
ensembles from across the globe.

The recipient of this scholarship will receive $750 to attend the NFA’s
44th Annual Convention in San Diego this summer, plus complimentary
convention registration, and a one-year membership to the NFA. This
is a great opportunity for a flute student to gain insight, inspiration, and
connections to further their flute musicianship and career.

The Frances Blaisdell Convention Scholarship is open to full-time
students under the age of 25. Applicants cannot be previous recipients
of the scholarship.

If you are not eligible to apply, please share this information with students,
colleagues, friends, and anyone who might want to attend the convention,
but currently lacks the financial means to do so.

Applications are due May 1. Visit the Frances Blaisdell Scholarship page
to learn more about the opportunity or submit an application.  
 
Victoria Pampe
Membership Manager
National Flute Association
70 E. Lake Street, Suite 200
Chicago, IL 60601
312-332-6682 (office)
312-332-6684 (fax)
vpampe@nfaonline.org

===============================

III ASMAC DAVID BLACK LUNCHEON

ASMAC Luncheon with
Special Guest Dave Black of Alfred Music

@ Catalina’s Jazz Club 
Wed., April 20, 2016 @ 11:30am

ASMAC LUNCHEON WELCOMES
Percussionist/composer/author 
Dave Black
April 20, 2016 - 11:30AM
@ Catalina’s in Hollywood

 
Percussionist, composer, and author, Dave Black, received his Bachelor of Music in percussion performance from California State University, Northridge. He has traveled around the world with a variety of entertainers and shows, performing and recording with such artists as Alan King, Robert Merrill, June Allyson, Anita O’Day, Pete Jolly, Frankie Capp, Gordon Brisker, Kim Richmond, Victor Lewis, Jerry Hey, and Steve Huffsteter.

A seasoned professional in this aspect of our business, Dave will share his thoughts about the “nuts and bolts” and current challenges in educational music publishing. What are the advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing? How do you research which publishers might be right for you? How best to submit your music for publication? How must composers participate in the marketing of their music. Perhaps you need a distributor and not a publisher? What is the future of E-books? What are the problems of digital sharing of music materials? Bring a pencil and take notes!

A prolific composer and arranger, more than 60 of his compositions and arrangements have been published by most of the major publishers, many of which have been recorded. Mr. Black has written with, and for the bands of Louie Bellson, Sammy Nestico, Bill Watrous, Bobby Shew, Ed Shaughnessy, Gordon Brisker and the C.S.U., Northridge Jazz Ensemble.

He has been the recipient of numerous awards and commissions, including 26 consecutive ASCAP Popular Composer Awards, two Grammy participation/nomination certificates–one for his performance contribution on Anita O’Day’s Grammy®-nominated album In a Mellow Tone, and the other for his contribution as album-track composer on Louie Bellson’s Grammy®-nominated album Airmail Special. He is also the recipient of the 2012 Percussive Arts Society President’s Industry Award, a Modern Drummer Readers Poll award (best drum book), two Drum! Magazine Drummie! awards (best drum book), and a certified Gold Record award for the sale of more than 500,000 copies of Alfred’s Drum Method, Book 1. In addition, many of his compositions have been used as source/background music on numerous TV shows including All My Children, Coach, The Drew Carey Show, General Hospital, Ellen, Grace Under Fire, Nightline, Roseanne and Good Morning America. In addition, he co-wrote the “Final Rudimental Solo” (from Alfred’s Drum Method, Book 2) featured in the 20th-Century Fox hit movie, Drumline.

He presently serves as Vice President and Editor-in-Chief, School and Pop Publications, for Alfred Music Publishing Company.

Host:  Elliot Deutsch

Elliot Deutsch is a busy composer and arranger of large ensemble jazz music. In its tenth year of performing, the Elliot Deutsch Big Band has released two albums, played in every major jazz venue in Los Angeles, and hosted an impressive list of guest stars including Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Ron Stout, and many others.  Deutsch has written for Arturo Sandoval, Bill Watrous, Jane Monheit, Take 6, Terence Blanchard, and many others. In 2015, Deutsch arranged several songs for the Kennedy Center Gala “It Don’t Mean a Thing… A Celebration of Swing” under the musical direction of John Clayton.  His compositions and arrangements are published by Alfred and Walrus Music.
___________
Check out the ASMAC website - www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview DVD’s in the ASMAC store (Van Alexander, Ray Charles, Johnny Mandel, Jorge Calandrelli, Bill Ross, Jack Feierman, Sammy Nestico and more), to download ASMAC luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 
Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL

Read the rest of this entry »

FLASHBACK PART III / FORT WORTH / DAVID BLACK LUNCHEON / EVENTS

April 9th, 2016

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART III - BACK HOME
II. FORT WORTH SYMPHONY ASKS FOR HELP
III ASMAC DAVID BLACK LUNCHEON
IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

===============================

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART III
BACK HOME

In 2005, a highly placed group of musicians, frustrated with the
destruction of work in recording, put forward this proposal.
Even then the damage to recording because of the unusable recording
contracts forced down the throats of AFM Members because of the
RMA was losing us major work - and that was almost 11 years ago.

AS A REMINDER, THIS WAS ALMOST 11 YEARS AGO….

MAY 2, 2005

The following excerpts are from two articles (Jan. and Feb., 2000)
featured in the Local 802, New York City monthly publication, Allegro.
What is illustrated here is an attempt to promote recording work in
New York City following the continued loss of recording work in Los
Angeles and New York, a pattern that has continued to the present day.

The President and Secretary of Local 145 in Vancouver, Canada respond
to the January article and make the observation that film producers simply
want a buyout and that the AFM should reconsider how it does business
in the film industry (see last full paragraph).

Allegro, Volume C No. 1 January, 2000
Local 802 – New York City
RMA-NY,
Local 802 Launch Advertising Campaign Ads Promote New York as
Film Recording Venue

The creative talent of New York recording musicians was promoted in
a full-page ad that appeared in the Hollywood Reporter on Nov. 5. It was
an initiative of the New York chapter of the Recording Musicians Association
- which, with Local 802’s support, is planning a series of five advertisements
aimed at attracting more film recording projects to the New York City area.

The goal is twofold, said RMA-NY President Dominic Derasse. “First of all,
we want to put New York on the map as a location for producing quality
recordings for films - because a lot of people just don’t associate New York
with film recording.” And secondly, the ads are part of a national campaign
to reverse the runaway production that has taken so much film work out of
the country. “The Los Angeles local has been running ads in the Hollywood
Reporter for some time,” Derasse told Allegro, “and we wanted to play a role
in the campaign.” He said the response from people who have seen the ad
has been very positive.

The industry has been devastated by a flow of work to Canada and Mexico
- part of the loss of jobs in the United States caused by the passage of the
North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) several years ago. The Hollywood
Fair Trade Campaign, a coalition which has developed on the West Coast, charges
that the studios have turned their backs on their own community and engaged
in the wholesale destruction of the Hollywood jobs base.

That has an impact on jobs in New York, notes Jay Schaffner, Assistant Supervisor
of Local 802’s Recording Department. “In the past, a lot of scoring was done here
because the scoring stages in Los Angeles were overbooked. Now, with the
Hollywood facilities generally available, that isn’t happening. And the same cost
factors that have led the studios to send work abroad, rather than recording in
Los Angeles, affect us as well.”

The number of contracts filed for theatrical film and TV film recording jobs
over the last three years reflect a sharp drop in work available for New York
recording musicians. “In 1997, the Recording Department processed 53 contracts
for theatrical films and 34 for television films,” Schaffner said. “In 1998 the figures
were somewhat lower: 48 theatrical films, and 26 TV films. But the problems
really hit this year. In the first ten months of this year, only 17 contracts for
theatrical films were filed, and eight contracts for television.” Derasse pointed
out that film production, which had been increasing in New York since the early ’90s,
“dropped in a big way in 1999, for the first time.” However, he said, it appears that
television work is up. “And that’s another thing that we’re trying to look into
- to make sure that whatever music is done for those TV shows hopefully is
being done under contract with 802.”

———–

Allegro – Volume C No. 2 February, 2000
Local 802, New York City
The Musicians’ Voice is an open forum for discussion about the state of
union affairs. Please keep all letters to 500 words and send them to
Allegro, c/o Local 802, 322 West 48th Street, New York, NY 10036.

VANCOUVER MUSICIANS AREN’T BENEFITING FROM RUNAWAY FILM
PRODUCTIONS

To the Editor:
While reading the January 2000 issue of Allegro we came across the article
headlined “RMA - NY, Local 802 Launch Advertising Campaign: Ads Promote
New York as Film Recording Venue.” It stated in the third paragraph: “The
film industry has been devastated by a flow of work to Canada and Mexico —
part of the loss of jobs in the United States caused by the passage of the
North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) several years ago.”

As a Local situated in the major city of Vancouver, British Columbia, on the
West Coast of Canada (sometimes referred to as “Hollywood North”) we can
substantiate the fact that there has been over the years, and continues to be,
an extraordinary amount of film production in our geographical area. This
has been brought about by the willingness of our provincial and federal
governments to train world-class technicians in the film industry, and to offer
substantial tax incentives to the international film community.

Combined with a low-valued Canadian dollar, especially in comparison to the
U.S. dollar, has proven to be an irresistible incentive to American film producers
to produce their films in British Columbia. Once again, this gives credence to
the old saying that “loyalty is as thick as a dollar bill.” Our provincial government
is currently investing heavily in building new sound stages in the Vancouver area
to keep ahead of the demands of the film industry.

We can readily understand the real concerns of New York and Hollywood
technicians about the loss of jobs in their industry - but we feel that it should
be pointed out to Local 802 members that Canadian musicians, especially those
in the Vancouver area and members of Local 145, are receiving no work in
recording film scores related to the hundreds of movies and TV series being
produced in British Columbia.

It is our contention that scoring sessions for the multitude of films being produced
here continues to be done off shore or with non AFM members in the United States -
as close as Seattle, WA in our case. The Canadian dollar is currently pegged at a rate
of 0.6864 against the U.S. dollar, a level that has prevailed for a long time. One
might assume that an approximate 32 percent discount on the cost of producing
film music in Canada would be enticing, but not so. Local 145 has, as does every
other Local in every major city in Canada, an extensive and diversified pool of talented
musicians who are more than capable of performing any film score at a level consistent
with and equal to any musicians in the world. We are - as you are - proud to be able to
make, as well as back up, these claims.

It should be pointed out to all AFM members and officers that what the film
producers want from their composers is a score with no encumbrances; i.e.,
a buyout. The film composers do what they have to do to please their producers,
and as a result the composers themselves will often become the signatories and
compose a complete synthesized score. This then circumnavigates the AFM obligations
that are usually the responsibility of the film company and gives the producers what
they want. The other choices are off shore recordings in countries that are “the flavor
of the month” and offer total buy outs, non-AFM member sessions, or dark dates using
AFM members. One way or another, our current system of controlling recorded film
music by AFM members is being bypassed and eroded. Maybe it is time for the
Federation to revisit the way in which it does business with the film industry.

The one thing for sure is that any “runaway productions” of films to Canada, with
its cost of jobs to U.S. citizens, applies to the technical side only and not to the
musical side.
–R.A. (Bobby) Hales, President Local 145 & Wayne Morris, Secretary Local 145 [next
article]

——-

[AND 15 YEARS AGO]

Reports on runaway productions and their impact in the U.S. continue,
this time from the U.S. Commerce Secretary in early 2001:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, January 18, 2001 Contact:
Morrie Goodman 202-482-4883 Jim Plante 202-482-1008

COMMERCE SECRETARY MINETA RELEASES REPORT ON THE IMPACT
OF THE MIGRATION OF U.S. FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION
WASHINGTON, DC -

“Runaway film production” is having an increasingly dramatic impact on
U.S. film and television production according to a report Secretary of
Commerce Norman Y. Mineta issued today. The report entitled The
Migration of U.S. Film and Television Production provides data on the
practice of producing films outside the U.S.

“The most serious impact is in the area of made for television movies
for U.S. networks and cable systems,” Secretary Mineta said. He
added, “However, the impact is far ranging. ‘Runaway film production’
has affected thousands of workers in industries ranging from computer
graphics to construction workers and caterers. These losses threaten
to disrupt important parts of a vital American industry.”

The report cites one study that shows U.S. production of made for
television ‘Movies of the Week’ declined more than 33 percent in the
last six years, while production at foreign locations increased 55
percent. Another study cited in the report estimates the yearly
economic loss to the U.S. economy to be as much as $10 billion.

The report, produced by the Commerce Department’s International
Trade Administration (ITA), finds a number of factors leading to
runaway film production. Globalization, rising costs, foreign wage, tax
and financing incentives, and technological advances, combined are
causing a substantial transformation of what used to be a traditional
and quintessentially American industry into an increasingly dispersed
global industry.

The report notes that while foreign government wage and tax
incentives may not be the primary factor in determining the location of
film and television production, there is no doubt that when combined
with all the other factors discussed, these incentives constituted an
important consideration.

The report describes a number of on-going efforts on behalf of the film
industry, including government programs such as, expanding markets
for U.S. films through international negotiations, Export-Import Bank
loan guarantees and The Small Business Administration Loan Program/or
Independent Film Program.

The report also details a number of film industry suggestions for
further government action. Their inclusion is intended to identify
areas where further study is needed.

NEXT TIME: VIDEO GAMES AND STUDIOS

================================

II. FORT WORTH SYMPHONY ASKS FOR HELP

Dear FWSO musicians supporter,
Thank you for your signature on our open letter, and your
support of the Musicians of the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra.

Today, we’re calling on Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra management
to get serious about bargaining—and we need your help. 

Here’s what’s been happening
In January, we averted a possible strike and extended our contract
through July with the understanding that FWSO management would
eturn to the bargaining table ASAP. 

Since then, we’ve met only once, on March 9. Management has failed
to produce a proposal of any kind, and unilaterally cancelled 3 bargaining
sessions without offering alternate dates. And it took a sit-in at symphony
ffices before they finally gave us negotiation dates in April.

It’s time for management to get serious about bargaining.

What you can do
Call CEO Amy Adkins and tell her to bargain now, and support a
fair contract with growth, not cuts.

When: Monday, April 4: 9am-12pm
Call FWSO offices at 817.665.6500 x 117 and ask for Amy Adkins.
If you can’t get through, try Becky Tobin at extension 115.

There is power in numbers. Together, we can preserve the legacy of
Cowboys and Culture, and ensure that one of Fort Worth’s most
treasured institutions continues to thrive.

Sincerely,
The Musicians of the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra

P.S. After you make the call, write us back at action@growthnotcuts.org
and let us know how it went!

===============================

III ASMAC DAVID BLACK LUNCHEON

ASMAC Luncheon with
Special Guest Dave Black of Alfred Music

@ Catalina’s Jazz Club 
Wed., April 20, 2016 @ 11:30am

ASMAC LUNCHEON WELCOMES
Percussionist/composer/author 
Dave Black
April 20, 2016 - 11:30AM
@ Catalina’s in Hollywood

 
Percussionist, composer, and author, Dave Black, received his Bachelor of Music in percussion performance from California State University, Northridge. He has traveled around the world with a variety of entertainers and shows, performing and recording with such artists as Alan King, Robert Merrill, June Allyson, Anita O’Day, Pete Jolly, Frankie Capp, Gordon Brisker, Kim Richmond, Victor Lewis, Jerry Hey, and Steve Huffsteter.

A seasoned professional in this aspect of our business, Dave will share his thoughts about the “nuts and bolts” and current challenges in educational music publishing. What are the advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing? How do you research which publishers might be right for you? How best to submit your music for publication? How must composers participate in the marketing of their music. Perhaps you need a distributor and not a publisher? What is the future of E-books? What are the problems of digital sharing of music materials? Bring a pencil and take notes!

A prolific composer and arranger, more than 60 of his compositions and arrangements have been published by most of the major publishers, many of which have been recorded. Mr. Black has written with, and for the bands of Louie Bellson, Sammy Nestico, Bill Watrous, Bobby Shew, Ed Shaughnessy, Gordon Brisker and the C.S.U., Northridge Jazz Ensemble.

He has been the recipient of numerous awards and commissions, including 26 consecutive ASCAP Popular Composer Awards, two Grammy participation/nomination certificates–one for his performance contribution on Anita O’Day’s Grammy®-nominated album In a Mellow Tone, and the other for his contribution as album-track composer on Louie Bellson’s Grammy®-nominated album Airmail Special. He is also the recipient of the 2012 Percussive Arts Society President’s Industry Award, a Modern Drummer Readers Poll award (best drum book), two Drum! Magazine Drummie! awards (best drum book), and a certified Gold Record award for the sale of more than 500,000 copies of Alfred’s Drum Method, Book 1. In addition, many of his compositions have been used as source/background music on numerous TV shows including All My Children, Coach, The Drew Carey Show, General Hospital, Ellen, Grace Under Fire, Nightline, Roseanne and Good Morning America. In addition, he co-wrote the “Final Rudimental Solo” (from Alfred’s Drum Method, Book 2) featured in the 20th-Century Fox hit movie, Drumline.

He presently serves as Vice President and Editor-in-Chief, School and Pop Publications, for Alfred Music Publishing Company.

Host:  Elliot Deutsch

Elliot Deutsch is a busy composer and arranger of large ensemble jazz music. In its tenth year of performing, the Elliot Deutsch Big Band has released two albums, played in every major jazz venue in Los Angeles, and hosted an impressive list of guest stars including Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Ron Stout, and many others.  Deutsch has written for Arturo Sandoval, Bill Watrous, Jane Monheit, Take 6, Terence Blanchard, and many others. In 2015, Deutsch arranged several songs for the Kennedy Center Gala “It Don’t Mean a Thing… A Celebration of Swing” under the musical direction of John Clayton.  His compositions and arrangements are published by Alfred and Walrus Music.
___________
Check out the ASMAC website - www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview DVD’s in the ASMAC store (Van Alexander, Ray Charles, Johnny Mandel, Jorge Calandrelli, Bill Ross, Jack Feierman, Sammy Nestico and more), to download ASMAC luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 
Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL

Read the rest of this entry »

FLASHBACK - LONDON / MEMBER COMMENT / ASMAC FUNCTIONS / EVENTS

April 3rd, 2016

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART II - LONDON
II. MEMBER COMMENT
III ASMAC UPCOMING FUNCTIONS
IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

===============================

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART II
LONDON

In 2005, a highly placed group of musicians, frustrated with the
destruction of work in recording, put forward this proposal.
Even then the damage to recording because of the unusable recording
contracts forced down the throats of AFM Members because of the
RMA was losing us major work - and that was almost 11 years ago.

AS A REMINDER, THIS WAS ALMOST 11 YEARS AGO….

MAY 2, 2005

How did we get here and what is our competition?

The following segments are from a variety of resources, illustrating
supporting data to back up our proposed changes to the national
Motion Picture and Low Budget Agreements.

London has been one of the most active recording cities in the world. [EC: Far more so now.]
Provisions in their recording contracts through the British Musicians Union
have made it economically favorable to record there. “Package deals” – such
as the combined use fee – bundles the soundtrack with the motion picture
for release in perpetuity and, in addition, there are actual total buyouts negotiated
on a project-by-project basis. The number of recording projects done in the UK,
brought in particularly by U.S. producers, speaks for itself in terms of the volume
of work leaving the U.S.

From the House of Commons/United Kingdom Parliament website:
http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200203/cmselect/cmcumeds/667/667we47.
htm

Excerpt from:
Memorandum submitted by the British Musicians Union
THE RIGHT TRACK: THE IMPORTANCE OF FILM TO UK MUSIC
CREATORS
RESPONSE TO THE CULTURE MEDIA AND SPORT SELECT COMMITTEE
INQUIRY INTO THE BRITISH FILM INDUSTRY
This short briefing outlines the importance of film music for British
musicians, refers to the success on the international scene of British
composers commissioned to write soundtracks for films and mentions
the importance of London as a location for recordings.

FILM SCORE RECORDING
More films scores are recorded in London than in any other city
in the world apart from Los Angeles [EC: No longer true]. More
than 30% of Hollywood scores come to London for recording and
synchronizing with picture. All the major and independent studios
return repeatedly, knowing that the musical artistry and technical
expertise here is virtually unrivalled anywhere in the world.

For instance, all the music for the Star Wars films was recorded in
London over many years and Lucas Film and composer, John Williams,
are due to return again.

So, why record in London? Well, producers, particularly Americans,
come here for three main reasons.

1. The UK is competitive on price.

2. The studio infrastructure is comparable only to Los Angeles in
terms of quality.

3. The sheer number and quality of musicians, again, is unequalled,
apart from in LA.

Annex B lists just some of the 152 Hollywood films that came to
London to record scores over the past three years. [2002-2005]
As a result of the rapid technological advances in digital sound
recording, it is now possible to achieve chart success through a
sound recording made in the bedroom of a small dwelling. However,
the large orchestral forces required for major film projects require
large studios and cutting edge technology. Again London is rivalled
only by Hollywood in this area with the same number of large scoring s
tages.

The main “state of the art” studios are:
— Abbey Road.
— Air Lyndhurst.
— Phoenix Sound.
— Sony Studios.
— Angel Studios.
— CTS at Watford. [No longer exists.]
[EC: It should be pointed out that London now has MORE large studios
than Los Angeles. We are down to three: Warner’s, Sony and Fox.

Music is recorded in the UK under the terms and conditions of the
agreement between the Producers Alliance for Cinema and Television
(PACT) and the Musicians Union (MU). Under the Combined Use
clauses of this agreement, which is used for theatrical and television
film, the producer acquires the right to incorporate the musicians
performance into the film and to use or license others to use the film
in all media throughout the world in perpetuity and to release the
music on commercial audio recordings.

In 1998 musicians’ basic fees alone amounted to £3.45 million. The
figure for 2001 is almost £4.2 million. These figures are net of studio
costs (which can average £3,000 to £6,000 per day), music
preparation, international transportation, hotels and other
considerable ancillary costs that further add to inward investment.

PROMOTING BRITISH MUSIC IN THE US

The UK’s trade promotion bodies, whether through Trade Partners UK
or the proposed UK music office in New York, could play an important
role in identifying opportunities and pro-actively marketing British
music creators to the US film industry. The potential for increased US
and international exposure, and the resulting economic returns, could
prove a useful boost to the UK music industry at this critical time in its
development.

From the UK Film website:
http://www.britfilmusa.com/d_film_music.php
Facilities
Did you know that the British music industry is worth £4 billion ($6
billion) a year? For a long time, the UK has been a virtuoso player in
the music production and recording business. And this success is due
mainly to the skill of Britain’s world-renowned musicians, composers
and technicians as well as the contribution made by the country’s
excellent recording facilities.

These skills and resources have, naturally, been snapped up by the
film industry, and scores written and/or recorded in the UK are an
intrinsic part of many internationally successful films. In fact, over
30% of Hollywood film scores alone are now recorded in the UK, and
London is second only to LA in terms of the number of music
soundtrack recordings it produces.

Pictures that have gained from their involvement with the UK’s
music production industry include:
Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels; The Full Monty; Billy Elliot;
Shakespeare In Love; Star Wars: Episode 1 - The Phantom Menace;
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin; Bridget Jones’s Diary; Lord of the Rings
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Titanic, and all the James
Bond films

The UK’s Music Industry

The UK’s music production sector has three main strengths which
have proven irresistible to international film and television producers:
Superb technical facilities
Top quality recording engineers
World class musicians, orchestras, songwriters and composers.

Recording Facilities

It’s an undisputed fact that the UK’s studios are among the best
equipped anywhere. In many cases, they are less expensive than
elsewhere, too.

Recording Engineers

Talented, efficient and professional, British recording engineers have
an excellent reputation throughout the world. No wonder overseas
companies looking to record scores frequently return to the UK and
ask for the services of specific engineers.

Musicians

The UK has a pool of talented orchestras, individual musicians,
songwriters and composers who together cover every style of music
imaginable.

Orchestras

Some of the world’s finest orchestras can be found in the UK. Like
many people, you may associate the London Philharmonic Orchestra,
the London Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
with the concert hall, but these orchestras, together with many others,
are regularly involved in film recording. What’s more, individual
members of these orchestras are often booked by contractors for
soundtrack session work.
Both orchestral players and individual session musicians in the UK are
universally recognized as consummate professionals. They can walk
into a recording studio and play a new score without the need for
hours of rehearsal. The value of such professionalism to a film or TV
producer who wants his/her soundtrack on time and within budget
hardly needs mentioning!

Composers

Given the UK’s wide range of award-winning composers (which
includes David Arnold, John Barry, Anne Dudley, Rachel Portman and
Stephen Warbeck), it should come as no surprise to learn that an
impressive number of film scores have been written and/or recorded
in Britain, even though some of the films themselves were shot
elsewhere.

A comprehensive list of media composers can be obtained from
The British Academy of Composers and Songwriters (BACS).
Advice on composer agreements can be obtained from the Producers
Rights Agency. (Remember to seek independent advice, too.)

Fees for score commissioning vary according to the length of music
needed, the status of the composer and the rights to be acquired.
When budgeting for the composition element of a score, you must
take into account the cost of arranging and copying, attendance
sessions, and the time the composer may be asked to put in during
the editing process.

Recording Sessions and Cost Efficiency

The proper organisation of recording sessions can save you, the
producer, time and money.

The music production industry works to an agreement called the
Musicians’ Union Agreement, which allows some degree of flexibility
when it comes to booking session-time. In other words, you won’t find
yourself automatically committed to a three-hour session unless you
want to be.

If you want the right to exploit a music soundtrack in all media
throughout the world in perpetuity and to release a commercial record,
you can engage musicians under the ‘combined use fee’. In effect, this
amounts to a ‘buy out’, but you should seek advice if you intend to use
extracts of the score in related programmes or products.
Under the ‘combined use fee’, session fees are divided into four
scales. A scale of pay is determined by multiplying the number of
musicians booked by the number of hours worked. For example, 30
musicians booked for three four-hour sessions equals 360 hours of
employment. In this case, Scale two rates would apply, which give a
discount of over 25% on the basic hourly rate.

For more information about musician fees and working practices,
contact the Musicians’ Union. Alternatively, contact the Producers
Alliance for Cinema and Television (PACT).

Music Contractors

The UK’s many experienced music contractors (also known as
fixers or bookers) are the ideal people to advise you about the
practicalities of arranging and booking musicians.

They can:
-Help you budget for the recording and organise the sessions
in a cost effective manner
-Help with finding the best-priced studios for the job (try and
book the dates you want as early as possible)
-Book the musicians
-Arrange completion and signature of the musicians’ consent
forms
-Pay the session fees
-Musicians usually expect to be paid on the day of a session
so you will have to pay the contractor up front.

Music producers, supervisors & copyright consultants

A good music producer, supervisor and/or copyright consultant
can help to make a producer’s life easier and, in the long run,
save him/her money.

A music producer can help manage the whole music process by
assisting with the budget and other administrative business,
handling music clearance procedures, booking studios, liaising
with thecomposer and overseeing and/or producing the sessions.

NEXT - OUR SIDE OF THE POND

===============================

II. MEMBER COMMENT I

I’ve thought a lot about this and even though I realize the corruption
of the current RMA (for at least 20 years plus), there should be a
players conference that represents recording musicians within the
AFM whether it includes the RMA or not.

I feel that it has to be structured in a radically different way and
policed by AFM to represent the best interests of the national
recording membership. But with AFM officers and IEB in alliance
with RMA, this will never happen until they’re out of office.

This will only happen when there is NO MORE recording work
left in LA on contract or so little that the disenfranchised musicians
in LA revolt and force the AFM to restructure the RMA to
produce contracts that support work. We’re getting closer to this.

The RMA should have amongst its conference representatives from
Locals that do recording work. The officers of the RMA should be
elected by RMA chapters AND recording committees within the Locals.
It should be overseen by an arbitrator outside of AFM so the best
contracts are produced for the general union and not always skewered
to only represent keeping a contract that is non globally competitive 
(motion picture) at the expense of all other contracts. The independent
arbitrator could be funded through AFM by dropping a member of the
IEB and the resulting salary available.

I certainly realized a few years ago that it didn’t matter to the AFM/IEB
how many graphs and Powerpoint presentations that you showed them
concerning the direction of the video game industry recording revenue 
under AFM contract since 2010. It didn’t matter that in 5 years they lost
this Industry when we were moving forward so nicely prior to 2010 with
capturing the most important recording venue available.

Eventually, a revolt either by election or not will have to happen. I’ll be
there to support this, believe me. It’s only that after years of trying, I
realize that nothing can be done until this happens in LA.

===============================

III ASMAC UPCOMING FUNCTIONS

ASMAC “FIRST WEDNESDAYS”

CONCEIVING  AN ORIGINAL ARRANGEMENT
featuring
Elliot Deutsch and Patrick Williams
 
Wednesday April 6, 2016   7:00 p.m.- 10:00 p.m.
Free Event for members of Local 47 and ASMAC, $10 for guests
AFM Local 47, 817 Vine St. Hollywood CA 90038

Elliot Deutsch is a rising star among young arrangers in Los Angeles.
Patrick Williams is one of the most accomplished and in-demand arrangers today.

They will each present an arrangement that they have written and recorded and talk about their process. Come and learn how an accomplished arranger conceives of his or her unique vision through the scope of a familiar tune.

Patrick Williams
Having composed the music for over 65 feature films, 100 television films, 25 television series, as well as 19 albums and 30 concert works, Patrick Williams has established himself as one of the most accomplished and prolific composers in the music industry today. He has received four Emmy awards with twenty-two nominations and two Grammy awards with twenty-one nominations, two of which come from his latest release, “Home Suite Home”.  He has also been nominated for both an Academy Award and the Pulitzer Prize in music. He is a recipient of the Richard Kirk Award from BMI and the Golden Score Award from the American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers.

Born in Missouri, Williams grew up in Connecticut and received a degree in history from Duke University. His first love, however, was always music, and when he went on to Columbia to study music composition and conducting, his passion became his profession. He quickly became busy as an arranger in New York, and then in 1968, he moved to California to pursue work in the film and television industry while continuing to write and arrange jazz albums. Proficiency in composing for symphony orchestras as well as jazz bands has offered Williams an opportunity to create a wide variety of works. Among his critically acclaimed compositions are An American Concerto, a piece featuring a jazz quartet and symphony orchestra, for which he received a 1977 Pullitzer Prize nomination; Gulliver, featuring a symphony orchestra with narrator, for which he received a Grammy nomination (narration by Larry Gelbart and performed by Sir John Gielgud); Suite Memories, which features a solo trombone with symphony orchestra and won a Grammy award; Theme for Earth Day, an overture, recorded by the Boston Pops; Spring Wings, a double concerto written by saxophonist Gerry Mulligan and pianist Dave Grusin with symphony orchestra; Romances, a concerto for jazz saxophonist Tom Scott and orchestra; A Concerto in Swing for big band and clarinet, which was dedicated to and premiered by Eddie Daniels; Adagio for Orchestra composed in 2004; and August composed in 2005. He recently completed a ballet, “Ziji”, with choreographer Edgar Zendejas to honor the 60th Anniversary of the College of the Fine Arts at the University of Utah.

Some of Williams’ big band recordings are considered classics of contemporary big band instrumentals, such as Threshold for which he received a Grammy in 1974; Too Hip for the Room, for which he received a Grammy nomination in 1983; Tenth Avenue which received a Grammy nomination in 1987 and Sinatraland, a big band tribute to Frank Sinatra for which he received a Grammy nomination in 1998. In 2006, he received two Grammy nominations for the album Elevation with Tom Scott and Eddie Daniels.In September 2001, he won an Emmy for his song, “A Dream That Only I Can Know,” from the film, Yesterday’s Children. In 2002, he received an Emmy nomination for his score for “We Were The Mulvaneys” and a Grammy nomination for “The Theme from Blonde” from the sountrack album for the TV miniseries Blonde, a portrait of Marilyn Monroe. In 1992, Williams won the Emmy for the mini-series “Jewels”. He has composed and arranged themes and scores for television series including The Streets of San Francisco, Lou Grant, The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd, the Mary Tyler Moore Show, the Bob Newhart Show, Columbo, Slap Maxwell, The Tony Randall Show, and the Magician. Recent television projects include Hercules, starring Sean Astin, The Perfect Husband: The Laci Peterson Story; When Angels Come To Town and Finding John Christmas starring Peter Falk; James Patterson’s First to Die; Power and Beauty;The Thin Blue Lie; The Three Stooges with Michael Chiklis and A Cooler Climate starring Sally Field and Judy Davis. Of the 65 plus films Williams has scored in his career, a few include Breaking Away, for which he received a 1978 Oscar nomination; All of Me, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, Swing Shift, Cuba, Violet’s Are Blue, Casey’s Shadow, The Cutting Edge, Cry-Baby, and The Glass Harp. Williams is also an accomplished arranger with extensive credits. The album, For Ella featuring Patti Austin, which he co-produced and arranged, was nominated for a 2003 Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal album. He was chosen by Frank Sinatra to act as Musical Director/ Arranger- Conductor for his final studio recordings, Duets and Duets II. He has arranged recordings for Michael Bublé, Jack Jones, Andrea Bocelli, Paul Anka, Peter Cincotti, Natalie Cole, Neil Diamond, Gloria Estefan, Michael Feinstein, Vince Gill, Amy Grant, Thomas Hampson, Barry Hay, Monica Mancini, Barry Manilow, Bette Midler, John Pizzarelli, Brian Setzer, Barbara Streisand, Traincha, and Russell Watson.

Williams has been a leader in the music education field for many years, holding posts as Visiting Professor and Composer in Residence at the University of Utah and the University of Colorado, which awarded him an Honorary Doctoral Degree. He has performed and/or lectured at many colleges including Berkeley College of Music, Cornell University, Duke University, Indiana University, Texas Christian University, (1993 Green Honors Professor), UCLA, USC, and Yale University. In May 2001. he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Duke University. He served as Artistic Director of the Henry Mancini Institute from 2001 to 2006.


Elliot Deutsch is a busy composer and arranger of large ensemble jazz music. In its tenth year of performing, the Elliot Deutsch Big Band has released two albums, played in every major jazz venue in Los Angeles, and hosted an impressive list of guest stars including Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Ron Stout, and many others.  Deutsch has written for Arturo Sandoval, Bill Watrous, Jane Monheit, Take 6, Terence Blanchard, and many others. In 2015, Deutsch arranged several songs for the Kennedy Center Gala “It Don’t Mean a Thing… A Celebration of Swing” under the musical direction of John Clayton.  His compositions and arrangements are published by Alfred and Walrus Music.
 
Deutsch is also a busy educator, serving on the faculties of Cal Poly Pomona and Long Beach City College. Deutsch has written numerous commissions for school jazz bands including USC, Caltech, CSULB, Cal Poly Pomona, Esperanza High School, and many others. He lectured on arranging for Middle School Jazz Ensemble at the 2016 Jazz Educators Network National Conference.
Wednesday April 6, 2016 - 7 PM 

$10 for Guests and Students
FREE for ASMAC & Local 47 members

Free parking.

Meet-up & Check-in: 7:00-7:30 PM.
Program: 7:30-10:00 PM.
 
PLEASE NOTE LOCATION:
AFM Local 47 - Auditorium
817 Vine St.
Hollywood, CA 90038

* ASMAC Members who would like to share music at a
FIRST WEDNESDAYS event,
Contact info@asmac.org  Attn: Milton Nelson
 
—————————–

ASMAC LUNCHEON

ASMAC Luncheon with
Special Guest Dave Black of Alfred Music

@ Catalina’s Jazz Club 
Wed., April 20, 2016 @ 11:30am

ASMAC LUNCHEON WELCOMES
Percussionist/composer/author 
Dave Black
April 20, 2016 - 11:30AM
@ Catalina’s in Hollywood

 
Percussionist, composer, and author, Dave Black, received his Bachelor of Music in percussion performance from California State University, Northridge. He has traveled around the world with a variety of entertainers and shows, performing and recording with such artists as Alan King, Robert Merrill, June Allyson, Anita O’Day, Pete Jolly, Frankie Capp, Gordon Brisker, Kim Richmond, Victor Lewis, Jerry Hey, and Steve Huffsteter.

A seasoned professional in this aspect of our business, Dave will share his thoughts about the “nuts and bolts” and current challenges in educational music publishing. What are the advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing? How do you research which publishers might be right for you? How best to submit your music for publication? How must composers participate in the marketing of their music. Perhaps you need a distributor and not a publisher? What is the future of E-books? What are the problems of digital sharing of music materials? Bring a pencil and take notes!

A prolific composer and arranger, more than 60 of his compositions and arrangements have been published by most of the major publishers, many of which have been recorded. Mr. Black has written with, and for the bands of Louie Bellson, Sammy Nestico, Bill Watrous, Bobby Shew, Ed Shaughnessy, Gordon Brisker and the C.S.U., Northridge Jazz Ensemble.

He has been the recipient of numerous awards and commissions, including 26 consecutive ASCAP Popular Composer Awards, two Grammy participation/nomination certificates–one for his performance contribution on Anita O’Day’s Grammy®-nominated album In a Mellow Tone, and the other for his contribution as album-track composer on Louie Bellson’s Grammy®-nominated album Airmail Special. He is also the recipient of the 2012 Percussive Arts Society President’s Industry Award, a Modern Drummer Readers Poll award (best drum book), two Drum! Magazine Drummie! awards (best drum book), and a certified Gold Record award for the sale of more than 500,000 copies of Alfred’s Drum Method, Book 1. In addition, many of his compositions have been used as source/background music on numerous TV shows including All My Children, Coach, The Drew Carey Show, General Hospital, Ellen, Grace Under Fire, Nightline, Roseanne and Good Morning America. In addition, he co-wrote the “Final Rudimental Solo” (from Alfred’s Drum Method, Book 2) featured in the 20th-Century Fox hit movie, Drumline.

He presently serves as Vice President and Editor-in-Chief, School and Pop Publications, for Alfred Music Publishing Company.

Host:  Elliot Deutsch

Elliot Deutsch is a busy composer and arranger of large ensemble jazz music. In its tenth year of performing, the Elliot Deutsch Big Band has released two albums, played in every major jazz venue in Los Angeles, and hosted an impressive list of guest stars including Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Ron Stout, and many others.  Deutsch has written for Arturo Sandoval, Bill Watrous, Jane Monheit, Take 6, Terence Blanchard, and many others. In 2015, Deutsch arranged several songs for the Kennedy Center Gala “It Don’t Mean a Thing… A Celebration of Swing” under the musical direction of John Clayton.  His compositions and arrangements are published by Alfred and Walrus Music.
___________
Check out the ASMAC website - www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview DVD’s in the ASMAC store (Van Alexander, Ray Charles, Johnny Mandel, Jorge Calandrelli, Bill Ross, Jack Feierman, Sammy Nestico and more), to download ASMAC luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 
Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL
Read the rest of this entry »

FLASHBACK / COMMENT I / COMMENT II / VIENNA SCORING / EVENTS

March 26th, 2016

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART I
II. MEMBER COMMENT I
III. MEMBER COMMENT II -
IV. VIENNA SCORING STAGE REACHES OUT
V. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

===============================

I. FLASHBACK TIME - 2005 - PART I

In 2005, a highly placed group of musicians, frustrated with the
destruction of work in recording, put forward this proposal.
Even then the damage to recording because of the unusable recording
contracts forced down the throats of AFM Members because of the
RMA leadership was losing us major work - and that was almost 11
years ago.

AS A REMINDER, THIS WAS ALMOST 11 YEARS AGO….

MAY 2, 2005

Recording music for film, TV and video games is a commercial business. While
the music itself is a creative art form utilizing many talents – negotiations with
producers, directors and composers, in addition to the preparation of budgets
and contracts is nothing less than running a business.

Recorded music becomes a product for sale, a commodity. What does the
market demand and what will it bear? How can the musicians who record this
music be fairly compensated, without giving away or compromising their product?

How can their product result in a steady revenue stream while competing in a
global economy that has changed the way we do business forever? These are
the questions we must face and respond to when considering and ultimately
proposing monumental changes to the national AFM Motion Picture Agreement.

The rapid and dramatic decline of motion picture union recording projects in the
U.S. during the last 10 years coincides with a substantial and devastating
increase in recording projects outsourced in non-union environments as well as
foreign unionized countries. The historical pattern of how and why we got to this
point must be reviewed and analyzed. We must then make an organized and
thoughtful effort to recapture and reinvent our recording opportunities by creating
a new business model.

The current longstanding business model – reflected in AFM recording
agreements – has failed to maintain a regular flow of recording opportunities for
the majority of our rank and file recording musicians. The agreements are
outdated and woefully inadequate to compete in today’s global market.

Producers consistently seek a buyout alternative so they can close out their
books once the music is recorded. In addition, many composers confined with
package deals and a restricted budget are forced to go non-union or with a
foreign orchestra “buyout”, rather than face the unknown back-end charges
associated with our current motion picture agreements.

There is a significant financial burden placed on our locals and the AFM due to
policing and enforcing the secondary market issues on these outdated contracts,
not to mention the consuming hours of labor in order to impose compliance.
Money and time would be much better spent on lobbying for more work for our
musicians through federal and state tax incentive legislation.

The complexity of the agreements themselves consistently turn off producers
because they are difficult to read and the terms and conditions challenging to
understand. A more user-friendly and concise agreement is necessary.

We have just witnessed video game recording – a new and explosive opportunity
for recording soundtracks – fly right out of California, where most of the larger
video game companies reside, and go directly to Seattle and London. It is a fact
that only one video game score has been recorded on an AFM contract in the
U.S. since early December 2004, compared with 14 projects recorded last year.

The business model that resulted in the outsourcing of motion picture production
and recording – a process over the last 15 years – is the same model in its
infancy used for video game projects, which are running away at warp speed. It
has taken just four months for this new industry to be almost completely
outsourced.

This broken business model – with new use provisions attached – is driving work
away at an amazingly accelerated speed. This recording work must be recaptured
immediately or we will be lamenting about these runaways for many years to come,
just as we are now looking back at years of motion picture scores being recorded
elsewhere.

As long as other viable options (i.e. non-union; buyout agreements in foreign
countries) exist for film producers, the U.S. will never see a substantial amount of
work return to this country without adopting a “buyout” option in our agreements.
A successful business model, offering attractive economic incentives must be
procured to bring back work to our U.S. recording centers and to help foster new
relationships with film producers and composers.

WHAT IS A SUCCESSFUL MODEL

A successful business model takes an idea and converts it into an
economically viable business. It defines how an entity is positioned
in a specific industry and market, and how its value can be maximized
and sustained. A consistent and successful generation of revenue is
related to strategy, economics, operations, finance, innovation and
marketing.

“The classic business model that has dictated the structure of every
company from General Motors to Microsoft is so at odds with contemporary
economic currents that it must and will disappear. The old principles no
longer work in the new age. Businesses have reached the old model’s limits
with respect to complexity and speed. The real problem is a ruinously
dysfunctional mismatch between today’s business environment and the
classic business model… Quite simply, the wrong model may transform a
company into the vehicle of its own death.” 1

The successful entities of the future need to harness the full potential of
the entire organization in the rapidly changing business environment.
“The world is going to be too tough and competitors too ingenious as companies
are shaken loose from traditional ways of conducting business. The winners
will be the unbridled firms that are responsive to challenges and adroit in both
creating and capturing opportunities.” 1 Consistent ineffectiveness in how we
have been doing business requires new strategies and thoughtful innovation.

HOW DO WE COMPETE?

A sustainable competitive advantage that positions our recording industry in
the market to effectively maintain a steady flow of business, while surviving
against the competition over a long period of time needs to be implemented.
This requires constant reinvention of the terms and conditions of our agreements
and resources, adaptability of ever-changing global market conditions and
the creation of value-added incentives for new and sustained business.

Now is the time to take advantage of favorable economic conditions in the
U.S., when the British pound is strong and the dollar’s purchasing power
is considerably diminished in other countries. In addition to the proposed
changes to the Motion Picture Agreement, there should be continuous lobbying
for taxincentives through federal and state legislation to keep production in this
country.

Foreign governments have been extremely aggressive in this area, in order
to attract U.S. businesses and keep them returning. In some instances, there
are partnerships (government and production company) encouraging foreign
investment in the local economy.

We would prefer to maintain a national agreement that represents ALL recording
musicians, rather than shift to the current and popular idea of negotiating
separate local agreements in individual cities. Now is the opportunity for us
to leverage our negotiating power and lead our recording industry into a
new level of sustainability and prosperity in the U.S.

NEXT TIME - HISTORY
…and London

===============================

MEMBER COMMENT I -DUPLICITOUS CONDUCT?

Dear Editor,

Contrary to the initial reasons offered by the Local to sell Vine Street, e.g.
the need of a new roof, electrical upgrades, and the desire for ADA
compliance, the real reason to sell Vine Street appears to be about
having enough money to continue doing business as usual.  To get
the referendum passed, the Local spent thousands of dollars of its
resources beyond the the costs of promotional materials and mailings
charged to the “Club”.  The Local by their own admission generated
20,000 phone calls encouraging members to vote YES.

What the membership might not know, is that the Union hired a person
by the name of Erick Cruz at the beginning of the referendum process in
October.  Erick, who only one month prior, looks to have been an employee
of the same company that was hired by the Local to promote the sale of
Vine Street.

Erick Cruz was assigned to help the Election Board and indeed was the
person identified by the Election Board Chair as the person who helped
scan the ballots.

Erick Cruz’s LinkedIn profile identifies his job description at Bridge Street
as “Social Innovation Organizer” and subsequently Local 47 “Campaign
Manager.” Does anyone see a problem with this?

A partisan with his hands all over the ballots? In what universe does the
administration reside in thinking this is appropriate?

An attempt to speak with Erick Cruz on the day of the referendum count
concerning his participation was thwarted by the gruff intentional intrusion
by the Local’s attorney. Not only was the conversation interrupted
but, the attorney physically removed him from member inquiry.

In an event that appears to be related, the Board minutes of 2/16/16
reflect the resignation of a member of the Election Board.  As a member
observer at that Executive Board meeting, I can attest to the naming
of Erick Cruz and that certain of Cruz’s actions were disturbing. 

Member Observer

[EC: What was the attorney afraid of? More and more questionable
conduct,... and the board says nothing. do ethics mean anything
anymore?]

===============================

III. MEMBER COMMENT II

The local put in a formal bid several weeks ago.
I don’t know what that was or whether or not they
received a response yet.

Using the facts that are known and methods of deductive
thinking, 47 has some real challenges going forward.
Acosta stated in this month’s electronic newsletter that
they will not sell the Vine street property until the new
property is secured first. That means that for all practical
purposes they will have to put up some cash as deposit on a
new property to secure it.

So, how much money would it take in deposit to secure a
$10M property, and does 47 have that cash?

I think what really has not been available is full disclosure
to the membership. What I’m not sure about is how much of that
is being deceitful and how much of that is ignorance, It seems
that nobody on that Board knows what to do, let alone just what
is going on.

[EC: According to the record of the 2/9/16 EC Meeting, Acosta
accepted an offer on the Vine Street building (We further heard
that the bid was for 25 Million). We've also been told that the
Alameda building is still in play, but no word that it has been
definitely secured. So did he misrepresent the situation to the
membership? If the bid was accepted before a building was
secured, it's just another example of the President printing
untruths in his articles. and yet the membership just sits idly by.]

===============================

IV. VIENNA SCORING STAGE REACHS OUT

…another result of our unusable contracts

Info from Postcard….

HOLLYWOOD MUSIC WORKSHOP 2016
Learn hands on from Hollywood’s Music Elite

3-day and 6-day Master Classes
from July 6- August 11,2016
Work with top Composers, Arrangers and Orchestrators

Record your composition with an 18pc orchestra at the brand new
VIENNA SCORING STAGE

www.hollyoodmusicworkshop.com

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QUESTION / BRIAN O’CONNOR / FIRST WEDNESDAY’S / FILM MUSIC APPS / RUSS GARCIA BOOK/ EVENTS

March 19th, 2016

QUESTION FOR LOCAL 47 MEMBERS

I. MEMORIAL FOR BRIAN O’CONNOR
II. FIRST WEDNESDAYS with Eliot Deutsch and Patrick Williams
III. MASTER IN FILM MUSIC APPLICATIONS STILL BEING ACCEPTED
IV. NEW RUSS GARCIA BOOK
V. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

================================

•••QUESTION FOR LOCAL 47 MEMBERS•••
“we need to hear from you”

Did you vote “Yes” on the sale of the Local 47 building
but now feel duped by the process and would vote differently
if you had the chance?

Please write and let us know ASAP:
commresp47@responsible47.com

We want to hear from you!

===============================

I. MEMORIAL FOR BRIAN O’CONNOR

BRIAN O’CONNOR
French Horn
December 1951 – March 2016
 
Memorial service:
Saturday March 26, 2:00-3:00 PM

Lutheran Church in the Foothills
1700 Foothill Blvd.
La Canada Flintridge, CA 91011
 
There will also be a Musical Celebration of Brian’s Life at
Local 47 in June. Stay tuned for further details.
 
In lieu of flowers, please contribute to the UCLA Neurology
Foundation.  You may send a donation by check or money
order to:
 
Attention: Luba Skoropad
Department of Neurology Finance Office
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
710 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1769
 
Make check payable to: UCLA Foundation
 
Please indicate on the memo line:
“For the research of Dr. Linda Liau.”

================================

II. ASMAC PRESENTS: FIRST WEDNESDAYS


CONCEIVING  AN ORIGINAL ARRANGEMENT
Eliot Deutsch and Patrick Williams

FIRST WEDNESDAY’S
Wed. April 6, 2016 - 7:00pm
ELLIOT DEUTSCH and PATRICK WILLIAMS

 Wednesday April 6, 2016   7:00 p.m.- 10:00 p.m.
Free Event for members of Local 47 and ASMAC, $10 for guests
AFM Local 47, 817 Vine St. Hollywood CA 90038

Elliot Deutsch is a rising star among young arrangers in
Los Angeles. Patrick Williams is one of the most accomplished
and in-demand arrangers today. They will each present an
arrangement that they have written and recorded and talk
about their process. Come and learn how an accomplished
arranger conceives of his or her unique vision through the
scope of a familiar tune.

PATRICK WILLIAMS

Having composed the music for over 65 feature films,
100 television films, 25 television series, as well as 19
albums and 30 concert works, Patrick Williams has established
himself as one of the most accomplished and prolific
composers in the music industry today. He has received
four Emmy awards with twenty-two nominations and two
Grammy awards with twenty-one nominations, two of
which come from his latest release, “Home Suite Home”. 
He has also been nominated for both an Academy Award
and the Pulitzer Prize in music. He is a recipient of the
Richard Kirk Award from BMI and the Golden Score Award
from the American Society of Music Arrangers and
Composers.


Born in Missouri, Williams grew up in Connecticut and received
a degree in history from Duke University. His first love, however,
was always music, and when he went on to Columbia to study
music composition and conducting, his passion became
his profession. He quickly became busy as an arranger in New
York, and then in 1968, he moved to California to pursue work
in the film and television industry while continuing to write
and arrange jazz albums. Proficiency in composing for
symphony orchestras as well as jazz bands has offered
Williams an opportunity to create a wide variety of works.

Among his critically acclaimed compositions are An American
Concerto, a piece featuring a jazz quartet and symphony orchestra,
for which he received a 1977 Pullitzer Prize nomination; Gulliver,
featuring a symphony orchestra with narrator, for which he received a
Grammy nomination (narration by Larry Gelbart and performed by Sir
John Gielgud); Suite Memories, which features a solo trombone with
symphony orchestra and won a Grammy award; Theme for Earth Day,
an overture, recorded by the Boston Pops; Spring Wings, a double
concerto written by saxophonist Gerry Mulligan and pianist Dave
Grusin with symphony orchestra; Romances, a concerto for jazz
saxophonist Tom Scott and orchestra; A Concerto in Swing for big
band and clarinet, which was dedicated to and premiered by Eddie
Daniels; Adagio for Orchestra composed in 2004; and August
composed in 2005. He recently completed a ballet, “Ziji”, with
choreographer Edgar Zendejas to honor the 60th Anniversary of the
College of the Fine Arts at the University of Utah.

Some of Williams’ big band recordings are considered classics of
contemporary big band instrumentals, such as Threshold for which
he received a Grammy in 1974; Too Hip for the Room, for which he
received a Grammy nomination in 1983; Tenth Avenue which received
a Grammy nomination in 1987 and Sinatraland, a big band tribute to
Frank Sinatra for which he received a Grammy nomination in 1998. In
2006, he received two Grammy nominations for the album Elevation
with Tom Scott and Eddie Daniels.In September 2001, he won an
Emmy for his song, “A Dream That Only I Can Know,” from the film,
Yesterday’s Children. In 2002, he received an Emmy nomination for
his score for “We Were The Mulvaneys” and a Grammy nomination for
“The Theme from Blonde” from the sountrack album for the TV
miniseries Blonde, a portrait of Marilyn Monroe. In 1992, Williams
won the Emmy for the mini-series “Jewels”. He has composed and
arranged themes and scores for television series including The
Streets of San Francisco, Lou Grant, The Days and Nights of Molly
Dodd, the Mary Tyler Moore Show, the Bob Newhart Show, Columbo,
Slap Maxwell, The Tony Randall Show, and the Magician. Recent
television projects include Hercules, starring Sean Astin, The Perfect
Husband: The Laci Peterson Story; When Angels Come To Town and
Finding John Christmas starring Peter Falk; James Patterson’s First to
Die; Power and Beauty;The Thin Blue Lie; The Three Stooges with
Michael Chiklis and A Cooler Climate starring Sally Field and Judy
Davis. Of the 65 plus films Williams has scored in his career, a few
include Breaking Away, for which he received a 1978 Oscar
nomination; All of Me, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, Swing
Shift, Cuba, Violet’s Are Blue, Casey’s Shadow, The Cutting Edge,
Cry-Baby, and The Glass Harp. Williams is also an accomplished
arranger with extensive credits. The album, For Ella featuring Patti
Austin, which he co-produced and arranged, was nominated for a
2003 Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal album. He was chosen by Frank
Sinatra to act as Musical Director/ Arranger- Conductor for his final
studio recordings, Duets and Duets II. He has arranged recordings for
Michael Bublé, Jack Jones, Andrea Bocelli, Paul Anka, Peter Cincotti,
Natalie Cole, Neil Diamond, Gloria Estefan, Michael Feinstein, Vince
Gill, Amy Grant, Thomas Hampson, Barry Hay, Monica Mancini, Barry
Manilow, Bette Midler, John Pizzarelli, Brian Setzer, Barbara Streisand,
Traincha, and Russell Watson.

Williams has been a leader in the music education field for many
years, holding posts as Visiting Professor and Composer in Residence
at the University of Utah and the University of Colorado, which
awarded him an Honorary Doctoral Degree. He has performed and/or
lectured at many colleges including Berkeley College of Music,
Cornell University, Duke University, Indiana University, Texas
Christian University, (1993 Green Honors Professor), UCLA, USC, and
Yale University. In May 2001. he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate
of Fine Arts from Duke University. He served as Artistic Director of
the Henry Mancini Institute from 2001 to 2006.

——————-

Elliot Deutsch is a busy composer and arranger of large ensemble
jazz music. In its tenth year of performing, the Elliot Deutsch Big
Band has released two albums, played in every major jazz venue in
Los Angeles, and hosted an impressive list of guest stars including
Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Ron Stout, and many others.  Deutsch
has written for Arturo Sandoval, Bill Watrous, Jane Monheit, Take 6,
Terence Blanchard, and many others. In 2015, Deutsch arranged
several songs for the Kennedy Center Gala “It Don’t Mean a Thing… A
Celebration of Swing” under the musical direction of John Clayton. 
His compositions and arrangements are published by Alfred and
Walrus Music.


Deutsch is also a busy educator, serving on the faculties of Cal Poly
Pomona and Long Beach City College. Deutsch has written numerous
commissions for school jazz bands including USC, Caltech, CSULB,
Cal Poly Pomona, Esperanza High School, and many others. He
lectured on arranging for Middle School Jazz Ensemble at the 2016
Jazz Educators Network National Conference.

Wednesday April 6, 2016 - 7 PM 

FREE for ASMAC/Local 47 members
$10 for guests and students
Free parking.

Meet-up & Check-in: 7:00-7:30 PM.
Program: 7:30-10:00 PM.
 
PLEASE NOTE:  NEW LOCATION
AFM Local 47 - Auditorium
817 Vine St.
Hollywood, CA 90038

* ASMAC Members who would like to share music at a
FIRST WEDNESDAYS event,
Contact info@asmac.org  Attn: Milton Nelson

+++++++++++++++

NEXT ASMAC LUNCHEON
ASMAC LUNCHEON
Wed. April 20, 2016
11:30am - 2:00pm
CATALINA’S JAZZ CLUB
Special Guest
DAVE BLACK

Check out the ASMAC website - www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview 
DVD’s in the ASMAC store, to download ASMAC
luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 

Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL

================================

III. MASTER IN FLM MUSIC APPLICATIONS STILL BEING ACCEPTED

The Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program
At The
Seattle Film Institute

is still accepting applications to the One year

Master of Music (MM) in Film Composition

Recently rated as the #4 school for film scoring education
in the world by Music School Central and the #2 school
for earning a Masters of Music degree in Film Composition

Study with program creator and lead instructor

Hummie Mann

2 Time Emmy Award Winning film composer of
“Robin Hood: Men in Tights” and featured in
Variety Magazine’s article “Leaders in Learning”

Click here to listen and watch student scores from previous years

Applications are now being accepted for the 2016
school year We offer rolling admissions - applying
early is recommended Scholarship support is
available to early applicants
 

===============================

IV. NEW RUSS GARCIA BOOK

Russell Garcia:   Russell wrote his auto-biography
“I Have Hundreds Of Stories, Some Of Them True”  
before he passed away at age 95 in New Zealand,
on 20 Nov 2011.  The book is out now.

Russell was a world renowned composer-arranger-conductor
who wrote music for over 100 films.  He is known for his
innovative music score for the film “Time Machine”.  Garcia
is also known in both the TV and recording fields and has
composed music for countless TV shows such as, Rawhide,
Twilight Zone, Laredo, The Virginian.  He has recorded many
CDs  in his own right, as well as with stars such as, Louis
Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Vic Damone, Judy Garland,
Oscar Peterson, Julie London, to name a few.  

Garcia has also written 2 best-selling text books The Professional
Arranger-Composer “ Book I and Book II, which have been translated
into 6 languages.  He is known also for his symphonic and classical
works which have been performed by the New Zealand Symphony,
Munich Symphony, the Vienna Symphony, plus countless Radio
Symphony Orchestras throughout Europe.  He was often a guest
lecturer at many universities around the world on Symphonic
Composition Techniques.  Russell and his wife Gina made New
Zealand their home in 1971 while continuing to work in the Music
and Film Industry.  He was awarded the Queens Service Medal
for his service to music in 2009.
(www.buildabetterworldproductions.com)

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KALEIDOSCOPE RESPONSE / BUILDING / SCOTT HEALY / COMMENTS / EVENTS

March 12th, 2016

I. KALEIDOSCOPE RESPONSE
II. MORE ON THE “TO BE OR NOT TO BE” BUILDING
III. SCOTT HEALY AT ASMAC LUNCHEON
IV. MEMBER COMMENTS
V. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

================================

I. KALEIDOSCOPE RESPONSE

The founder of Kaleidoscope responded to the member
comment on a couple of Facebook pages, so we thought
we’d share it as well, just to make sure our readers are aware.

See below…

——————–

A friend made me aware of this blog and the post about
Kaleidoscope. As the founder of the organization, I wanted
to address some of the concerns. I’ve been happy to talk
with John Acosta in the past and receive his support for
what we’re doing, and I have the greatest respect for
our union and all the musicians who are part of it.

Firstly, our highest priority is raising money to pay
musicians as much as possible as soon as possible.
Aside from playing in the streets or using synthesizers
instead of timpani, we are prioritizing paying musicians
above everything else. Building an audience and raising
money is extremely challenging with a new organization,
and we’re doing everything we can to raise money and
give back to musicians as soon as possible. If anyone
reading this would like to help or recommend others
who could be a help to us, I would love to hear from you!

As a long-term goal I would like to see us become one
of the highest paid orchestras in the US and a destination
orchestra for the finest musicians who choose to live
in Los Angeles… but that will not happen overnight.
We would not exist without many incredible musicians
being extremely generous with their time when they can,
wanting to play together, and believing in our potential.
I’m completely donating my time and spend at least 20
hours a week helping organize things in addition to
playing clarinet. We’ve also had musicians turn down
subbing work with LA Phil, San Diego Symphony,
and many other groups to play with us.

Why would some musicians turn down paid work with the
LA Phil to play with a new group and donate their time?
That’s a very personal decision that everyone has to answer
for themselves. How much money do you need to be happy
and how much artistic satisfaction do you need in your life
and where do they intersect? What do you personally consider
artistically satisfying?

Kaleidoscope offers something unique among orchestras
in LA, where every musician has an equal say in the artistic
process of each rehearsal. It’s something that we usually
only experience with chamber music, and I think Kaleidoscope
is more similar to a string quartet with how it functions in
most ways than a traditional orchestra. We’re not anti-
conductor, but performing without one allows a very different
process and dynamic in rehearsals. We all have to know the
score much better, watch and listen to each other and
communicate at a higher level with more trust, and when
it comes together, it’s really magical. It’s a group of people
who want to put the music first, invest in the process, and
spend as much time as they can getting into the details.

If we were only focused on the artistic side I think there
would be plenty of reason to exist, but we’re equally
interested in how we can engage with the community
and enact positive social change. Right now all of our
concerts are free for everyone under 18 and we also
perform many other free concerts at schools, hospitals,
homeless shelters, and other underserved parts of the
community. The first time we performed at a homeless
shelter, I met a man there whose father played clarinet
in the San Francisco Symphony many years ago. We’re all
connected and someone who ends up at a shelter in the
future could be one of our children…

The musicians who have generously donated their time
to be a part of Kaleidoscope have made our city a better
place for all of us, just like a doctor donating their services
to an AIDS clinic, or a lawyer doing pro bono work for a
woman who can’t otherwise afford their help. Does the
lawyer or doctor donating their expertise and time cause
their professions to race to the bottom? I’m more interested
in our personal race to our top artistic potential, finding
new ways to inspire audiences and my colleagues, and
how we can make the world a little better for all of us.

For anyone reading this who thinks great musicians deserve
to be paid whenever they play (which I completely agree with),
where do you think the money should come from? Who is
responsible for paying us to perform? Tickets sales, individual
donors, corporate sponsors, foundations and grants? All of
these sources come back to individual people, and people
deciding to support the arts with their money. It takes a long
time to build relationships and an audience and most groups
cannot rely on ticket sales for much of their budget. Major
donors and corporate sponsors often take years to cultivate.
Most foundations and grants do not consider organizations
until they’ve been around more than three years, and we’re
nearing the end of our second season now… There’s no
magic bullet and we’re going after all these things as much
as we can, but we can only do so much with the limited
resources we have.

Thank you everyone for your understanding and for the
many generous musicians who have been a part of
Kaleidoscope and for the many others who have been
incredibly supportive in other ways!

================================

II. MORE ON THE “TO BE OR NOT TO BE” BUILDING

As we reported last week, at the last staff meeting
John Acosta informed the staff that “the Alameda
Building is not available”.

Apparently, the Burbank property is now back on the
table and there are new realtors involved on are side.

This does not change the fact that President Acosta
announced to the staff the building’s unavailable
status.

Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

THE COMMITTEE

================================

III. SCOTT HEALY AT ASMAC LUNCHEON

ASMAC LUNCHEON WELCOMES
composer/producer/multi-keyboardist SCOTT HEALY
MARCH 16, 2016 - 11:30AM
@ CATALINA’S IN HOLLYWOOD
 
Los Angeles-based Scott Healy is a Grammy-nominated
composer, producer, pianist and multi-keyboardist who
multitasks across the musical spectrum. He is best-known
for playing in the house band for Conan O’Brien: first
on Late Night in NYC, then moving out to LA in 2009
for The Tonight Show with Conan O’Brien, and now 
Conan on TBS, where he holds down the keyboard chair in
the Basic Cable Band. He released Hudson City Suite, by
the10-piece Scott Healy Ensemble, in 2013, to worldwide
praise, stellar online and print reviews, national jazz radio
airplay, and a 2014 Grammy nomination for Best
Instrumental Composition. His recent CD, Live at Kilbourn
Hall by Scott Healy with the Eastman Chamber Jazz Ensemble,
was released in October, 2014. Healy was featured on the
cover of the February, 2015 issue of Keyboard Magazine,
and he was also featured in an “Indie Life” article in the
March, 2013 issue of Downbeat Magazine.

In addition to his composing, recording, and nightly
TV gig, Healy works as a hired-gun on piano, organ,
electronic keyboards and accordion for film and TV.
He has recorded and performed with many of the
greats in rock, blues, R&B and jazz: Bruce Springsteen,
Bonnie Raitt, Al Green, BB King, Jackson Browne, Levon
Helm, Son Seals, Hubert Sumlin and Tony Bennett,
among others. He has worked as an arranger for
major label releases, including scoring the big band
arrangement for the 2001 Ricky Martin hit “She Bangs”.

Healy’s work reflects his classical piano, composition,
conducting and orchestration training, as well as his
years in the studio and on the stage, whether it be on
the podium, in the band or behind the glass. Other
composing, arranging and scoring credits include
the Portland Symphony, the Aspen Contemporary
Ensemble, the Mel Lewis Orchestra, Christina Aguilera,
and music for film and TV. He he recently received a
commission for a extended jazz work from the Chelsea
Music Festival, to be premiered by his ensemble
in NYC at the festival’s closing concert in June, 2016.

Record producing credits include albums by his
own groups—the Scott Healy Ensemble, NYC electronica
supergroup The Coalition, jazz piano trio, big band and
quintet music.

Healy is a contributing editor to Keyboard Magazine,
where he wrote a long-running advice column, “Session
Sensei”, and to which he continues to contribute feature
articles and lessons. His blog, ProfessorScoSco, explores
various aspects of composing, listening, and arranging.
He organized and leads the ongoing Ellington Study
Group Los Angeles, an informal workshop in jazz
composition and theory. He has taught master
classes and seminars at Eastman School of Music,
Brown University and Boston University.  In addition
to the Grammy nomination, he has received awards
from BMI, The National Endowment for the Arts,
and the “Distinguished Artist” award from the
New Jersey State Council on the Arts.


Join us for an entertaining and informative luncheon
with one of the busiest musicians around!
___________
RSVP HERE: http://tinyurl.com/hhhgrhu
—————
UPCOMING EVENTS:

FIRST WEDNESDAY’S
Wed. April 6, 2016 - 7:00pm
ELLIOT DEUTSCH and PATRICK WILLIAMS
MORE INFO TO FOLLOW

ASMAC LUNCHEON
Wed. April 20, 2016
11:30am - 2:00pm
CATALINA’S JAZZ CLUB
Special Guest
DAVE BLACK

Check out the ASMAC website - www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview 
DVD’s in the ASMAC store, to download ASMAC
luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 

Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL

===============================

IV. COMMENTS

Appreciating the persistence you put into your website and in
depth of information you provide.

It’s good to come across a blog every once in a while that isn’t
the same out of date rehashed material.

Great read! I’ve bookmarked your site and I’m adding your RSS feeds
to my Google account.

[EC: Thank you for your support! Do others find the blog helpful?
Please let us know, pro or con.]

——————-

“The Burbank property is unavailable”

I guess they’re going to have to change their spin
to: “The Time Was Then.”

===============================
Read the rest of this entry »

BRIAN O’CONNOR / WELL, WELL / MEMBER COMMENT / EVENTS

March 5th, 2016

I. BRIAN O’CONNOR PASSES
II. WELL WELL…. NOW WHAT?
III. MEMBER COMMENT
IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’

scoring musician

…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

================================

I. BRIAN O’CONNOR PASSES

After a long battle with cancer, Hornist and Educator
Brian O’Connor passed away a few days ago.

He was an excellent musician, excellent teacher and
extraordinary person.

For over 30 years, he recorded in Los Angeles as a first call
French Horn player for over 2,400 movies, hundreds of TV
series and shows, thousands of records and jingles and many
Live TV shows including the original Carol Burnett Show
and 20 Oscar performances. He Principal Horn on over 800
movies.

From 1998 until 2009, Brian taught Horn at UCLA and a
number of his former students are now working in high
profile professional Horn jobs including the LA Studios,
Symphony and Opera Orchestras and Military Bands.

His battle with cancer and the surgery he underwent
was documented in a film some years ago.

He will be missed.

THE COMMITTEE

================================

II. WELL WELL…. NOW WHAT?

Well placed member comment….

Yesterday, (March 2, 2016) at approximately 11:30 AM,
the staff at Local 47 was called together in the main
office and told by President Acosta that “The Burbank
property is unavailable” and he would them keep them
informed.

Should anyone be surprised?

================================

III. MEMBER COMMENT

Really, how great is this…? There’s an orchestra that does not
have to be paid …and they’re working!!!

Two things…
1) obviously there are many very excellent and qualified
unemployed musicians…

2) willing to work for free…?

Talk about…”race to the bottom”…and there are Local 47
Executive Board members listed on their roster!!

This is just another way to “clear the decks”…when all the
locally supported community orchestras are put out of business…
here comes the new community service model.

Young inexperienced musicians will be told that playing
for free with Kaleidoscope will be a viable resume credit.

Just a visceral response to seeing this.

[EC: We've spoken to a number of folks who've been
asked to play upwards of 6 services for free per concert
(no paid services). A number of those in the group are
well placed, even some working to be on the "inside" at
Local 47.

Adding insult to injury they of course charge the public to
hear them.

The union wants to bust any non-union session or gig
they find, unless there are well politically placed members
playing for free, in which case Acosta et al do nothing.
The word dunsel comes to mind.

So then.... if all these well placed people can donate their
time for nothing, when you're asked about something
you're doing you can say the same. "I'm donating my time
to a friend... back off!" This should be the new mantra.

Until the Local enforces the rules equally to all members,
they should enforce nothing. Will that happen? Of course
not, they've got their ship coming in... and the elites to
answer to.... except they've (and we've) got no ship to go
to.... see below. We knew there should be a requirement
in the referendum that they actually buy a building with
the proceeds.]

Read the rest of this entry »

WHERE O WHERE / MUSIC PREP / EVENTS

February 27th, 2016

I. WHERE O WHERE DID THE….
II. MUSIC PREP - PART II - WEDNESDAY NIGHT!
III. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity - Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity - Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal - L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention - National touring musician

=================================

I. WHERE O WHERE DID THE….

According to federal law, the local must keep the ballots from
the referendum for 4 years (According to our legal person).

However, though the Local told the membership that they
had 1000-2000 extra ballots printed, those ballots have
not been accounted for.

The number of ballots used for re-sends and re-votes
doesn’t come anywhere near close to the number printed,
and they have not been cataloged with the bulk of the
used ballots.

So where are they? Who has them?

=================================

II. MUSIC PREP - PART II - WEDNESDAY NIGHT!
Free for Local 47/ASMAC members.

The Art of Music Preparation
7:00p.m.- 10:00 p.m. Wednesday March 2, 2016
Free Event for members of Local 47 and ASMAC, $10 for guests
AFM Local 47 817 Vine St. Hollywood CA 90038

The American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers
(ASMAC) is proud to present

“First Wednesdays”, a new monthly tradition now hosted by
Local 47 for it’s members. On the first Wednesday evening
of each month, ASMAC will produce a new event featuring
various topics of interest for music arrangers and composers
starting March 2nd with The Art of Music Preparation(pt2)

The Art of Music Preparation (pt.2) will feature Ross deRoche,
Liz Finch, Kim Richmond, Jim Ciancaglini. Join us for a special
and informative event with a panel of expert music copyists
who will discuss how to make the most out of a musician’s
performance by providing the best possible manuscript.

Thoughtful music preparation saves time and money at
recording sessions and rehearsals. Topics will include
important tips for orchestration, notation rules, computer
notation, part layout, binding, preparing midi for orchestration,
proofreading, various careers in music preparation, budgets,
and much more. Refine your skills as an orchestrator, composer
and music copyist by attending this once in a lifetime event.
We will have a Q&A between attendees and panelists.
Technical questions about Finale and Sibelius will be included.

OUR PANELISTS

Ross deRoche - Guardians of the Galaxy, Birdman, White House
Down, Mr. & Mrs. Smith,“300”, “2012”, Watchmen, End of the
World, The Day After Tomorrow, The Revenant, Unfinished
Business, Healer, The 33, Call of Duty-Black Ops II & III; 1996,
2002 Olympics.

Liz Finch who holds a MA degree in theory and composition,
has worked as a copyist for many years in both recording and
live performance, in the studio music libraries and independent
music preparation offices, as well as independently for many
high -profile arrangers and composers. She was sometimes
known as “the girl” at a time when there were very few women
in the profession. With the move to more digital music production,
she has also served as an orchestrator for many films with composers
such as Hans Zimmer, John Powell, and Steve Jablonsky

Kim Richmond (host) ASMAC President, Composer, Studio
Musician, Emmy nominated arranger. Orchestration for Knight
Rider, Arranger for Lalo Schifrin, Buddy Rich, Kim Richmond
Jazz Orchestra. Orchestra member: Stan Kenton, Louis Bellson,
Bob Florence, Bill Holman, and Vinny Golia. Educator: USC,
UC Fullerton, Cal Arts.

Jim Ciancaglini, Valle Music Reproduction
Disney, The Tonight Show, Universal-MCA, 20th Century Fox,
Warner Brothers, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Los Angeles Chamber
Orchestra, Los Angeles Master Chorale, The Boston, Cleveland, and
Cincinnati Symphonies, Aaron Spelling Production, John Addison,
Lalo Schifrin, John Cacavas, The James Guthrie Music Library.

================================

III. EVENTS

DEAN AND RICHARD

DEAN AND RICHARD are now playing every third Friday
at Culver City Elks 7:30pm-10;30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584

NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way they
should be.

We are in the back room called the Trailside Room.

Come on down. Guaranteed to swing.

————————————-

2/27/16

MICHAEL KIBBE PREMIERE

CONCERT ANNOUNCEMENT
The Humboldt State University Symphonic Band will
feature my latest work for band, the Poseidon Overture,
in concert at Fulkerson Recital Hall. The performance
will take place this coming Saturday, February 27th at 8:00.

This work was composed last year specifically for the HSU
Band. It is an energetic and tuneful “old-style” piece, with
lots of action for all sections of the band. Although
originally written for a smaller ensemble, the growth
of the band has necessitated addition of a few more
instruments.

Other works on the program are by Aaron Copland,
Percy Grainger, William Schuman and John Mackey.

The Jazz Orchestra completes the program, with
both new works and classics.
www.michaelkibbe.com

————————————-

2/28/16

SONG OF THE ANGELS FLUTE ORCHESTRA

Their Next concert, “Winter Dreams” is
Sunday, February 28th at 3:30pm at the Cornerstone Music Conservatory
12121 W. Pico Blvd., #205, Los Angeles, CA 90064

————————————-

2/28/16

BOYCOTT THE OSCARS OR JUST RECORD THEM.
YOU’LL BE HOME IN TIME TO MISS ALL THE COMMERCIALS.  ;-)
 
PLEASE JOIN US IN A SPECIAL CONCERT
 
PEGGY DUQUESNEL – PIANO & VOCALS
TONY JONES – DRUMS & VOCALS
RON ESCHETE – GUITAR
LUTHER HUGHES - BASS
 
Advance Reservations and Tickets Recommended:
$20 http://www.alvasshowroom.com/calendar.php


Sunday, February 28, 2016 4pm to 6pm 
Alva’s Show Room:
1417 W 8th St, San Pedro, CA 90732


“S’Wonderful Gershwin” show
https://youtu.be/G3MnKlvC4j8  
features the talents of jazz pianist and vocalist Peggy
Duquesnel along with multi-talented jazz vocalist and
drummer Tony Jones. Duquesnel and Jones bring fresh
vocal and instrumental arrangements to the Gershwin
Song Book repertoire with a nod to the duet recordings
of “Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong sing Gershwin.”
 
Duquesnel has performed and recorded with such notables as
Alan Broadbent, Henry Mancini, Pat Boone, Dionne Warwick,
Jeff Lorber, Rick Braun and Jimmy Haslip. She has released
ten CDs as a featured artist and is also an accomplished
composer, songwriter and arranger.
 
Jones performs around the world as a singer and drummer in
various bands and styles and has performed with artists
including Joe Diorio, Charlie Haden, James Newton, The
Beach Boys, Bob Dylan and Stephen Bishop. Jones is a
master impersonator of Louis Armstrong’s vocal style and
Jones’ grandfather, renowned composer Leon Rene’,
composed Louis Armstrong’s theme song “When it’s Sleepytime
Down South.”
 
Duquesnel debuted her solo Gershwin show at Segerstrom
Center for the Arts in Orange County and then with her trio
at the Jazz at Kitano in New York City.
 
Facebook event page:
https://www.facebook.com/events/517692678412478/
 
Booking Contact:
www.JoySpringMusic.com
866-887-3449

———————————————

3/2/16

Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts/
Jacqueline Suzuki & Susan Svrcek perform
RAUTAVAARA Lost Landscapes

FREE ADMISSION GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS
Every FIRST & THIRD WEDNESDAY at 12:10-12:40 pm
On Wednesday MARCH 2, 2016 at 12:10-12:40 pm:
Crescenta Ensemble: Einojuhani Rautavaara’s Lost Landscapes

CRESCENTA ENSEMBLE
Jacqueline Suzuki - violin
Susan Svrcek - piano
http://www.susansvrcekpianist.com/

Program:
P.I. TSCHAIKOWSKY Melodie, Op.42, No.3
EINOJUHANI RAUTAVAARA Lost Landscapes (2005)

RELAX DURING YOUR LUNCH HOUR WITH LIVE MUSIC

PLEASE NOTE:
The Glendale Noon Concerts series
now takes place in the Sanctuary at
GLENDALE CITY CHURCH
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St.)
Glendale, CA 91206-3701

INFO:
Please call Victoria Lucero (818-244-7241 office)
or email glendalecitychurch.org/
https://www.facebook.com/glendalecitychurch

****************************************************

UPCOMING CONCERTS in the same series:
(every FIRST & THIRD WEDNESDAY at 12:10-12:40 pm;
programs subject to change)

MARCH 16, 2015
HAROUT SENEKEREMIAN
PIANO RECITAL
Works by Faure, Rachmaninov & more
http://www.haroutsenekeremian.com/

APRIL 6, 2016
VIOLIN RECITAL
GINASTERA Pampeana No.1, Op.16 (1947)
BRAHMS Violin Sonata No.3 in D minor, Op.108
Jacqueline Suzuki - violin
Rosa LoGiudice - piano

APRIL 20, 2016
CRESCENTA ENSEMBLE
TSCHAIKOVSKY Meditation Op.42, No.1
GINASTERA Piano Sonata No.1, Op.22
Jacqueline Suzuki - violin
Susan Svrcek - piano

CONCERT UPDATES:
http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com/

MORE FREE CONCERTS:
At the Edendale Branch Library in ECHO PARK
http://www.edendaleupclose.blogspot.com/

>>>Saturday MARCH 12. 2016 at Noon-1pm
Baroque concert featuring works by
Handel, Monteverdi, Purcell & Scarlatti
BRIAN ASAWA - countertenor
DIANA TASH - mezzo-soprano
ARTHUR OMURA - harpsichord
ALEXA PILON - Baroque cello
http://www.brianasawa.com/
http://www.dianatash.com/
http://www.arthuromura.com/

—————————————-

3/2/16

California Jazz Foundation’s Annual Gala

GIVE THE BAND A HAND
6 pm, Saturday April 2nd, 2016
Cocktail hour, silent auction, live auction, dinner

The LA Hotel Downtown
333 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA

NICA Honoree - John Clayton
Heritage Award - Ray Brown

The Nica is awarded to those individuals who
exemplify the legacy of the Baroness Pannonica
de Koenigswarter, know as “Nica”, an iconic figure
who forged a unique bond with the Jazz community
at a transformative time in American popular Culture.

MUSIC PERFORMANCES FEATURING
- Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra
- Gerald CLayton, Grace Kelly, Christoph Luty,
Graham Dechter, Adam Bravo
- California Institute of the Arts Cmbo

—————————————————

3/2/15

ASMAC PRESENTS: FIRST WEDNESDAY’S

MUSIC PREP: PART II

Local 47 Auditorium
Wednesday, March 2nd 7:00 pm
817 Vine Street, Hollywood, CA

ASMAC continues the First Wednesday’s tradition with 
The Art Of Music Preparation Act II! Featuring a panel
of veteran copyists: Ross deRoche, David Giuli and
moderator Kim Richmond at the Musician’s Local 47
auditorium with lots more in depth discussion on the
art of music preparation.

—————————————————

3/5/26

TONY JONES VOCAL PROJECT

PLEASE JOIN ME FOR A LOVELY DAY AT THE BEACH

Tony Jones comes to the famed Lighthouse Cafe
with a stellar band to perform his arrangements
of songs from his CD “My Song.”

Tony Jones - Vocal, Percussion •
Chuck Manning - Sax •
Andy Langham – Piano •
Gabe Davis – Bass •
Tina Raymond - Drums

Saturday, March 5, 2016
11:00 am to 3:00 pm
Lighthouse Cafe - 30 Pier Ave, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254
No cover charge
https://myspace.com/tonyjonesvocalproject

—————————————————-

3/5/16

The 11th Annual Lympho-Maniac 70s Party

Saturday, March 5 at 7 PM in CST
New Orleans Lakefront Airport.

Dust off your Afro Wig….After taking 3 year hiatus,
LYMPHO-MANIAC 2016 PARTY officially set for Saturday
March 5th 2016 @ recently renovated New Orleans
Lakefront Airport. This venue is kick-@ss & perfect
fit for our 70s theme party.

Our fundraising goal is $100,000 with all proceeds from
event going to grants for lower income families (less than
35k gross income) in Greater New Orleans area who have
someone that is currently undergoing cancer treatment
@ East Jefferson General Hospital - EJGH

FYI Don Trump Jr and Vanessa Trump Jr have agreed to
come down and (once again) be our celebrity judges for
2016 Lympho-Maniac Dance contest = Winner takes home
Disco Ball. Only question now is whether or not we will be
able to film 2016 Lympho Promo @ the White House???

New 2016 Lympho-Maniac website soon to follow….
may the funk be with you, Chad

—————————————————

3/6/16

The 18th Annual West Coast Composer’s Forum Concert

It’s been 18 years ago since a group of like-minded
composers got the idea to all write for the same ensemble
and then put on a concert.

Since then we have produced a concert just about every
year, we have had dozens of composers participate, and
we have had some very interesting ensembles, one of
the more notable being: six saxophones (sopranino,
soprano, alto, tenor. baritone, bass)
and orchestral harp. CD’s are still available.

This year is the first concert where the composers will
also be the performers. it also happens that the
instrumentation is as strange
as ever. 

Alto sax & E.W.I. Electronic Wind Instrument (Joe Sorce)
Bassoon  (Charles Fernandez)
French Horn  (Steve Mahpar) 
Trombone & Poetry (John David Grab) 
Six String Electric Bass Guitar (Ross Wright) 
This concert in unique in other respects,
as we are participating in closing reception of a larger art project. 

AWOL
4937 Alhambra Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90032
 
“Being Ernest Shackleton | El Sereno (In Two Phases)”
Jim Ovelmen, Mehran Ayati, Mondo Bobadilla
Closing Reception
Sunday March 6th, 2016
3:30 pm 

Program:

-WEST COAST COMPOSERS’ FORUM 4:00 - 5:00 pm

-Caspar Sonnet + Eliot Eidelman 5:30 - 6:30 pm

-OHR + Guests (ROOFTOP PERFORMANCE): 7:00 - 8:00 p

West Coast Composers’ Forum 4:00 - 5:00 pm

West Coast Composers’ Forum includes award winning
composers who will present previously unpublished music
created for the closing exhibition, including “Endurance
in the Antarctic”. More about the composers and their music. 

JOE SORCE: Composer/Alto and EWI 
CHARLES FERNANDEZ: Composer/Bassoon 
STEVEN MAHPAR: Composer/French Horn 
JOHN DAVID GRAB: Composer/Trombone 
ROSS WRIGHT: Composer/Six String Electric Bass (Fretted and fretless)
CLIFFORD J. TASNER: Composer

*******************
Caspar Sonnet + Eliot Eidleman 5:30 - 6:30 pm

About Caspar Sonnet: 
https://casparsonnet.bandcamp.com/
http://casparsonnet.com/albums/

About Eliot Eidelman :
http://elioteidelmanmusic.com/ 

*******************
OHR 7:00 -8:00 pm

Ohr is a 5 piece experimental rock band from Los Angeles.
Formed by visual artists, Thomas Burkhardt,Brian Cooper,
Timmy Jordan, Jim Ovelmen, Jay Stuckey in 2015,
Ohr delivers a big sound of unbridled improvisation.

Ohr store: http://jimovelmen.com/music/OHR/TheOhrStore.htm 

*******************

About “Being Ernest Shackleton - El Sereno (In Two Phases)”
Please click here to read the Los Angeles Times Story 
 
About AWOL
Based in El Sereno, California, AWOL is dedicated
to artist projects, events, ideas, and irregular connections.
AWOL is located at 4937 Alhambra Avenue, Los Angeles CA 90032. 

www.awolimited.com
 
-###-
Contact:
Nicole Wang
626-675-5051 
awolimted@gmail.com

 
———————————————

3/6/16

The CSUN Youth Orchestras Invites you to our spring concerts!
Our performances are at 2PM & 5PM.

Plaza del Sol Performance Center - CSUN
18111 Nordoff St. Northridge, California 91330

Here’s the lineup:

2PM Concert - Camerata Strings & Symphony Orchestra
Join us for the 25th year of the Camerata Strings under the direction
of Kimberly Blake-Kilgore!

Our Symphony Orchestra will feature works by Verdi, Saint Saens,
Schubert, and Holst

5PM Concert - Philharmonic, featuring soloist Yuri Lim performing
the first movement of the Bruch Violin Concerto in B Minor.

Other works:
Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5
Music From Romeo and Juliet by Prokofiev

Tickets are available at the USU Ticket office during their scheduled
business hours and also an hour before each performance
http://www.csun.edu/as/ticket-office

Ticket prices are $15/Adults $10/Students, Seniors and groups of
10 or more.

We hope to see you there!

—————————————————

3/9/16

HOMENAJE
at Spaghettini in Seal Beach

We’re excited to bring our “Finding Hearts” concert to Spaghettini
jazz club in Seal Beach on Wednesday March 9th at 7pm!

Purchase tickets at http://spaghettini.tix.com/Event.aspx?EventCode=822185

We have new original material to share as well as old favorites of ours.
Keep up with our latest music and videos at:

www.homenajemusic.com

Homenaje is:

Genevieve Artadi - vocals
Will Brahm - guitar
James Yoshizawa - percussion
Jordan Richards -bass

We’ll see you March 9th!

—————————————————

3/12/16

SANDFORD HINDERLIE and TOM VAN DER GELD
in concert

Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 7:30 pm

The Biever Guest Lecture and Montage Series presents
an evening of Jazz with internationally known and
composer Dr. Thomas van der Geld performing with
Sanford Hinderlie, Professor of Music.

Tom van der Geld is legendary for his solo work and
group recordings for the German label ECM/JAPO.

Sanford Hinderlie has performed throughout the world,
including concerts in the Far East, Russia, the Republic
of Georgia and Armonia, the Middle East, Europe and
the United States.

—————————————————

3/12/16

MUSIC AT WESTWOOD - A LOS ANGELES TRADITION

 MARIA NEWMAN CONDUCTS a SPECIAL EVENT PERFORMANCE
George Frideric Handel’s “MESSIAH - PART II”

WESTWOOD MASTER CHOIR, SOLOISTS & CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Sunday Late Afternoon
March 13, 2016 - 5:00 pm 
Westwood Presbyterian Church

Is the “Hallelujah Chorus” really the end of Handel’s “Messiah?”
Experience the Westwood Master Choir and Chamber Orchestra
in the breathtaking continuation of the story begun in a legendary birth.

“Messiah - Part II” is the next chapter in a masterful oratorio setting
depicting impending persecution and astonishing resurrection.

Be inspired. - Be uplifted. - Join us.  
  
Wine and Cheese Reception to Follow  

Westwood Presbyterian Church 
10822 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90024
(310) 474-4535

$20.00 General Admission
$10.00 Student with ID
Parking is Free
Tickets available at
Eventbrite
and at the door

Contact: office@westwoodpres.org
(310) 474-4535 

FEATURING 
The Westwood Master Choir,
Westwood Chamber Orchestra  
Maria Newman, Conductor
 
Esteemed Vocal Soloists
Christina Borgioli, Soprano Soloist
Nandani Maria Sinha, Alto Soloist
Larry Duplechan, Tenor Soloist
Adam von Almen, Tenor Soloist
Paul Cummings, Baritone Soloist
Dimitri Smith, Baritone Soloist 

Reception Following the Concert
  
Concert Venue:
Westwood Presbyterian Church
10822 Wilshire Boulevard  
Los Angeles, California, 90024

This Special Event is Sponsored by
“Music at Westwood” 
Westwood Presbyterian Church
Los Angeles, California 
 
“Music at Westwood” Events are made  
possible by the generosity of your donations.  
 
office@westwoodpres.org
(3 1 0)  4 7 4 - 4 5 3 5 
A Los Angeles Tradition 
is the City Partner of the
Malibu Friends of Music

Visit the Malibu Friends of Music
Website at 
www.malibufriendsofmusic.org

Or Call the Montgomery Arts House (MAHMA)
(310) 589-0295 

forward this email to friends, family and music lovers
click on “forward email” below

Malibu Friends of Music | 6307 Busch Drive | Malibu | CA | 90265

—————————————————

3/19/16

WOMEN IN MUSIC CONFERENCE

Join us for a free* one-day conference on Women in Music!
Everyone welcome!

Choral Room (Music FA3-162)
Antelope Valley College Music Department
3041 West Avenue K, Lancaster, California 93536.

-9:30 am Registration:
Welcome from Dr. Berkeley Price, Chair, Performing Arts Department.

-10:00 am Dr. Jeannie Gayle Pool: “Babe Egan and Her
Hollywood Redheads: 1920s Vaudeville Jazz Band,”
with images and music.

Jeannie is an author, musicologist, composer, and filmmaker.

She is an officer for the American Society of Music Arrangers
and Composers and Vice President of the National Association
of Composers, U.S.A.

jaygaylemusic.com

-10:30 am Panel on “How to Manage Your Own Music
Publishing Company” with Dr. Deon Nielsen Price and
Adrienne Albert, et al; moderated by Marlene Hajdu.

Good, solid, practical advice about how to make your
music available to a wider audience. Marlene is a
composer and board member of the American Society
of Music Arrangers and Composers.

culvercrestpublications.com; adriennealbert.com

-11:30 am Carol Worthey: “Inspirational Words for
Composers.” Carol is a poet, composer, and painter
interested in the power of the arts in everyday life.

carolworthey.com

-12 noon Lunch: In a local restaurant, to be announced.

-2:00 pm Carolyn Yarnell: Presentation on her Symphony
No. 1. Carolyn is a composer, painter, and photographer
from Huntington Beach, CA.

carolynyarnell.com

-2:30 pm Workshop on Finale Music Notation with Bonnie
Janofsky, who will give us her “10 Favorite Finale Tips.”
Feel free to bring your laptops and your notational problems.
Bonnie is a composer, arranger, orchestrator, jazz drummer,
and Finale guru. A trustee of Local 47 of the Musicians Union,
Bonnie has plenty of good information to share.

-4:00 pm Recital of Music by Deon Nielsen Price,
Carol Worthey, Adrienne Albert, et al., by
saxophonist Chika Inoue and
pianist Mary Au.

Mary is on the faculty of California State University,
Dominguez Hills, and Chika is an upcoming saxophone star.

-5:00 pm Refreshments & Networking

-5:00 pm Symphonic Band Rehearsal

-7:00 pm Concert of Music by Alex Shapiro, Shelly Hanson,
Carolyn Bremer, Julie Giroux, Deon Nielsen Price, and others.

Conducted by Dr. Berkeley Price and Dr. Jermie Arnold,
Associate Director of Bands, California State University,
Long Beach. AVC Performing Arts Theatre.

*The conference is free; however, you are responsible to
pay for your own lunch and for your evening concert
ticket ($10).

Parking at Antelope Valley College for the day is $1.
Exit Avenue K from the 14 Freeway, and head West on
K to the college.

Park behind the Performing Arts Center. This event
is coordinated by Dr. Jeannie Gayle Pool, 818-606-5743,

jaygaylemusic@yahoo.com.

This conference is presented in cooperation with the
Antelope Valley College Department of Music, the Los
Angeles Chapter of the National Association of
Composers, U.S.A. (NACUSA), and the American
Society of Music Arrangers and Composers (ASMAC).

—————————————————–

3/25/16

SESSIONS AT THE LOFT:
An Evening with Gary Stockdale

Come enjoy a fun night of irreverant, clever, and provocative
songs from the award-winning composer, Gary Stockdale.
**Warning - Some material may not be suitable for children
Friday, March 25, 7 till 9 PM
General Admission $20/ticket - Limited Seating -
Advance Tickets advised:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/
an-evening-with-gary-stockdale-tickets-21438879265
Appetizers will be provided!
Bring your own beverage – wine is encouraged

—————————————————

5/15/16

LACESMA 75TH ANNIVERSARY DIAMOND JUBILEE GALA

The Los Angeles City Elementary Schools Music Association,
LACESMA, is celebrating its 75th Anniversary of promoting
elementary music education in LAUSD with a Gala Event in
the Grand Ballroom of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at
the Los Angeles Music Center on Sunday May 15, 2016.

Banquet tickets are $60.00 each and can be purchased by
going to our website at lacesmamusiced.org or by mailing
a check made out to LACESMA to: LACESMA c/o Jeanne
Mitchell, P.O. Box 361 Topanga, CA 90290.

For questions, please email us at lausdmusiced@gmail.com.
At the celebration there will performances by over 100 singers
of the LACESMA Children’s Honor Chorus, some of the 2016
LACESMA Instrumental Scholarship winners, as well as a p
erformance by a celebrity TBA.

We are proud to have Gail Eichenthal, Executive Producer of
KUSC, as the emcee of the Banquet. Please help support
elementary music education in LAUSD by attending this
Gala Celebration! Click here to see the first Promotional
Video Clip of the Gala.

https://youtu.be/DZNL_HJpN2w

================================

You can read all previous offerings at:http://www.responsible47.com
UNTIL NEXT TIME,
THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

 

================================

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

UNTIL NEXT TIME,
THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47