Archive for October, 2016

LETTER / MEETING / TUBAS? / EVENTS

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

10/29/16
I. LETTER TO THE EDITOR

II. LAST MONDAY’S LOCAL 47 NON-MEETING
III. LIKE TUBAS?
IV. EVENTS
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician
=============================================

I. Letter to Editor  Local 47 – GENERAL ELECTION 2016

Dear Editor,

The AFM 47 Website says; “For the first time in recent history, all candidates

who submitted nominating petitions for the 2016 Local 47 General Election

were unopposed.  On Sept. 16 the Election board declared all candidates

elected by acclamation.”

According to the Election Board Chair only one petition was obtained from

the Secretary-Treasurer and that petition contained a “slate” of all the

incumbents. That petition was circulated at both the Hollywood Bowl

and Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Subsequently, the Local 47 Secretary-Treasurer, Gary Lasley was

questioned about the fairness of the process .

1) The incumbents have access to obtain signatures where the

rank-and-file do not. Union officials can go to any rehearsal,

backstage or soundstage. Can the Union arrange for equal access

for those non-incumbents seeking signatures? ( It was just a few

years ago that the by-laws were amended prohibiting petition

signatures to be obtained at Local 47…where member musicians

gather to rehearse.)

2) Why was each person running for office not required to get

their own 50 signatures?  This would require that persons seeking

to serve the membership actually interact with the rank-and file

on their own.  Obtaining signatures in this instance of all incumbents

on a single “slate” forced the members to make an all or nothing

acceptance.

The answer from the Secretary-Treasurer was that making each

person get their  own signatures would be disruptive to the workplace.

Obviously, the incumbents are getting their signatures in the

workplace and  have engineered the rules to advantage themselves.

Further, the Secretary -Treasurer was very clear that any changes

would require a by-law amendment.

This situation makes it onerous for anyone not regularly in contact

with large groups of fellow musicians to collect signatures and run

for office.  The incumbents have a clear and distinct advantage which

disenfranchises the rank-and-file.

Under Title 29 § 452.51 Election of Officers of Labor Organizations.

“A union may not adopt rules which in their effect discourage or

paralyze any opposition to the incumbent officers.”

Member, Local 47 AFM

==============================

II.  LAST MONDAY’S LOCAL 47 NON-MEETING

LOCAL 47 GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING
No quorum reached – 34. Peaked at around 40 around 8pm.

Parlitmentairan rattled off reasons for passing a resolution

related to benefits for Officers, Committee members and

Executive Board members.

“Since increase is to the position not the person it’s OK.”

Acosta should not be able to vote on his own rate. Nor should

the other officers.

Isn’t that what the salary review board is for?

Member: Need to listen to legal opinion, would the change

put the local in more monetary problems.

Member: Galled that the hourly wage is increasing to $45.

Turns out it is already $45.

Levy says – Amendment generally is passed to next term

if defeated, If it’s not voted on at a meeting

Salary review board – Hourly pay is currently $45, not

requesting an hourly rate change.

OUR dues now will pay for HMO Insurance for directors

and executive board members.

PRESIDENT’S REPORT
Gives floor to RMA head – More talk of protecting the

recording musician’s product. Much more complicated now,

considering platforms

 

Board member – if most AFM recording happens in Los Angeles,
why are the meetings in New York?
Answer – All the labels are based in New York.

Pasadena Symphony negotiations happening.
Metro and orchestra contract – turning out to be chaotic…

too many cooks.
Musica Angelica has relocated to Long Beach. Working out

details for dues.
Cabrillo Music Theater – CBA is with contractor, not theater.

Want to change that.

-Co-Sponsored event with Michael Giacchino on a LOST theme

at Ford Theater… Big Success.

Still in talks with Magic Castle.

-Went to ICSOM.
LA Phil member is now chair of ICSOM.

-Concluded low budget seminar – thanks to those involved.
-New music prep chart is on website.
-Film musician fund workshop happened.
-AFTRA looking to put on future workshop.

Organizing:
Member leader: Purpose is to make a more powerful Union.
– Asking for phone volunteers.
– Working to get better contracts.
– Currently focusing on Pasadena Orchestra contract.
– Trying to get more work on AFM agreements.
– Musical Theater – Trying to convene Theater folks to get a plan together.
– Asked for feedback and ideas.

At 8PM have 40 attendees.

BUILDING
-In and out of escrow several times, mostly by the Local’s choice.

Are currently in the 3rd Escrow October 28th is the deadline,

which would mean end of year transition out of the building.

-MEMBER: In previous article Acosta said we’d not sell, the building

till we have somewhere else to go…. Acosta: That is true.

-Doesn’t one of the buildings have also an environmental issue,

a gas tank in the back. We’d have to spend money to do environmental

cleanup? True

-Another one of the buildings, for perhaps the same one, is actually under

lease into 2017. True,…. Formerly leased by Enterprise.

-MEMBER: The initial building on Alameda had three businesses in the

front parking lot. A big deal was made of the fact that the rents on those

businesses would pay the $120,000 per year property tax. That building

is out of the picture. Are the financial expectations being adjusted to

account for that?

-Must request extension if we’re not ready to go.

New Member – Why are we selling the building –

Answer given: Started campaign in 2015.
Campaign: Time is now – Several years of significant short falls

that caused us thinking to sell the building to insure our future

and stabilize the financials.

————-

-Checking out effect of Tax Incentive’s impact.

Health Care –  Hand W fund is looking at accepting a migration of

contributions under the motion pictures plan. Have all contributions

go into one bucket.

It’s complicated. Data goes to utilization issues. What are people using

and buying? Are they buying top tier or lower tier.

Fund is looking at several different options. Traditional, Side by Side

Flex, etc.

What would be the most optimal path?

Member: Since Taft Harley funds flex plan, we cannot have any effect

on that use.

Will we continue to have our plan subsidized the members?
Fund is subsidizing less than it used to be.
Answer:
-Will protect Local 47-

AFM
Rochelle Skolink is new SSD Director

Legislative Agenda for AFM
-IEB for December will take on national nonunion recording issues.
-New In house counsel hired by AFM for West Coast Office
-Ongoing negotiations with Sound recording companies,
Live TV and Broadway League for touring Pamphlet B Show.

VICE-PRESIDENT’S REPORT

Attended Pamphlet B negotiations.
Talked about election.
3 day meeting for PRO 61 rally – that included Bernie Sanders.

Over 500 people here. Built stage, Brought in bus.

Member spoke on 61.

Golf tournament – Rick is new Chairman, Acosta president of

Music Fund of LA.

Former President Espinosa has moved to Connecticut.

Went to ASMAC lunch with Nathan Wong.

Personal note: 1st Wednesday of November ASMAC will be

honoring “Animaniacs”  in the Auditorium.

SECRETARY’S REPORT
Financials – 2nd quarter revue
Income     $2,693,021
Outflow    $2,251,728
Profit         $  441,293 dollars

Overture has won 6 awards this year – thanks to Linda Rapka.

Books signings on December 4th 3-6
Washington Rucker
And one other

Dec. 6th – Referral service will have next mingle event
-2016 Directory is available.
-Free notary available for members
-All union radio station 47.org/radio
-Check into the overture online.

PROMUSIC DB platform is up
1)    Pro credits’ database – Digital platform – can validate the

information. Can fix Wikipedia problems. Create an archive.

Membership is a tax write-off.
2)    Educational Platform for digital musicians. Teaching online

etc. Can use dropbox affiliated with the Promusic DB.
3)    Can get you at other sites, they can put all your info together

for you in one spreadsheet.
Page is on Local 47 website – promusicDB.

COST of election – $20,000 dollars.

[ WHere did the $20,000 go? They didn’t spend our dues money

for the unchallenged campaign fees did they? There’s no need for

outside publication attention, only mention in the Overture.

So they must be talking about flyers and such, which THAT Slate

should have paid for.]

Resolution: Is it possible for the salary revue board to request a

vote at the next general membership meeting? YES
Request to postpose voting to next general membership meeting.
Board will either OK the delay or not. What will happen if they

do not allow it is not apparent. Board cannot, by our bylaws,

vote on their own salaries or benefits.

 

Must be voted on by the membership.
Meeting closed at 8:47.

=========================
III. LIKE TUBAS?
Here is a rare TUBA Collection article for those who might be interested.
http://tinyurl.com/h8be4gl

=========================
IV. EVENTS
PHIL NORMAN CD
Now Available for Purchase
Since last months formal release by MAMA Records,
the Phil Norman Tentet’s newest CD has moved up
from #209 to #20 nationally by

JAZZ WEEK CHARTS

which weekly tracks & monitors jazz CDs radio airplay

To order this NEW CD,
simply e-mail your name and address to
PHIL NORMAN and we will mail you a copy.

Upon receipt submit your check for $20 – it’s that simple.

———————————–

From Bill Berry
For Your Consideration
Hi folks,
I want to share some exciting news. Many of the people in

our songwriting community, as well as a few talented friends in

New Orleans and Nashville, are eligible for nomination for a

Grammy award this year. And I want to tell you about them.

For starters, my album Awkward Stage is eligible for Best

Comedy Album and the track The Piano Tuner With The

Lazy Eye for Best American Roots song!

For those of you who are Recording Academy voting members,

and those who aren’t, here are some of the artists and writers

in our circle who could make it to the 59th Annual Grammy

Awards. You can click on links to listen to the eligible albums

and tracks!

The Grammy Nominations will be announced on December 6th, 2016.
Don’t forget to vote!

-Bill Berry

———————————–

DEAN AND RICHARD
DEAN AND RICHARD are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive,
Burbank.
Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way they 
should
be. 

We are in the back room called the Trailside Room.
Come on down. Guaranteed to swing.
——————————–
10/29-30/16

 

HARVEST MUSIC FESTIVAL
RESERVE YOUR SEATS NOW

OCTOBER 29th – 30th at 7:30 PM

HARVEST MUSIC FESTIVAL 2016

Intimate Musical Soirees with
 Old World Hospitality and

Charm
 Presenting Extraordinary Concert Artists
 and

Distinguished Speakers

Two Evenings of World Class Music Making

Each Concert Featuring
 Unique Programming & Artists.

Tickets and Reservations are available

at:
www.malibufriendsofmusic.org

or call: (310) 589-0295

Saturday, October 29th at 7:30 pm

MONTGOMERY ARTS HOUSE FOR 
MUSIC AND

ARCHITECTURE
 Music Room

“BRINGING IN THE HARVEST”

Musical Works to Display the
Warmth of the Human Spirit
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Sunday, October 30th at 7:30 pm

MONTGOMERY ARTS HOUSE FOR
 MUSIC AND

ARCHITECTURE

Music Room
”SPOOKY SONORITIES”

The Sacred and Secular (And a CRAZY Haunted House)
Featuring Harvest Festival Artists

Performing Exceptional Works of
 Johannes Brahms, Gioachino Rossini,

Rebecca Clarke, William Bolcom
, Bela Bartok, Max Janowski and Maria Newman

2016 Harvest Festival Artists:

Christina Borgioli, soprano

Diana Tash, mezzo soprano

Nandani Maria Sinha, mezzo soprano

Wendy Prober, pianist

Maria Newman, violinist and composer

Scott Hosfeld, violist

Paula Hochhalter, cellist

MASTER OF CEREMONIES:
  Samuel Thatcher

For more information on the
 Malibu Friends of Music

please visit: www.malibufriendsofmusic.org

——————————–
11/2/16
Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts:
Wed NOVEMBER 2, 2016 at 12:10-12:40 pm

Ergo Musica Baroque Ensemble will perform

J.S. Bach’s Cantata BWV 152.

Website: http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com

Thank you!

Jacqueline Suzuki
, Curator, Glendale Noon Concerts

818-249-5108

—————————-

11/4/16

Charlie Ferguson Sextet
performing at
East Los Angeles College – S2 Recital Hall
1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez
Monterey Park, CA 91754

Friday, November 4, 2016
8:00 PM-9:30 PM (1 set)
$12 general admission, $6 students w/ ID

Charlie Ferguson – piano
Billy Kerr – tenor saxophone
Michael Stever – trumpet
Jacques Voyemant – trombone
Chris Conner – bass
Nate Laguzza – drums

Contact (323) 265-8894 for more information.
11/19/16
============================
SFV Symphony Orchestra
Nov. 19, 2016 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center
Bizet: Carmen Suite #1
Bizet: Symphony in C major
Fernandez: Oboe Concerto
 – Francisco Castillo, oboist
Sibelius: Violin Concerto in D minor, 1st mvt.
Thompson Wang, violinist

Contact: Roberta Hoffman, publicist (ladybirdysue@aol.com)
www.sfvsymphony.com
Program information:
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Other concerts in the series
Jan. 21, 2017 – Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills
Schumann: Manfred Overture
Mendelssohn: Symphony #3 in A minor (Scottish)
Belling: Music Madly Makes the World Go Round
Inaugural Performance
 Cary Belling, violinist

Mar. 18, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center
Tuttle: By Steam or By Dream Overture
Inaugural Performance
Prokofiev: Symphony #1 in D major (Classical)
Ben-Haim: Pastorale Variée for Clarinet, Harp and Strings
Geoff Nudell, clarinetist
Beethoven: Romance for Violin and Orchestra
Domine: Frankenstein Fantasy
Ruth Bruegger, violinist

May 13, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Saint-Saens: Bacchanale from “Samson and Delilah”
Tchaikovsky: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in C major
Egizi: Orchestral Suite
“In Memoria di Mio Padre”
Inaugural Performance
Programs subject to change
———————————–

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com
UNTIL NEXT TIME,
THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

AUSTIN LOCAL / FORT WORTH / EVENTS

Friday, October 21st, 2016

10/15/16
I. AUSTIN LOCAL TAKEN INTO TRUSTEESHIP
II. FORT WORTH RALLY
II. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician

…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician
=============================================

I. AUSTIN LOCAL TAKEN INTO TRUSTEESHIP
Austin’s oldest organized music entity suddenly hangs in the

balance. Local 433, the city’s musician union – established in

1907 – has been placed under trusteeship by the American Federation of Musicians.

 

The takeover, which went into effect Oct. 3, terminated all of Local 433’s elected officers, including president Freddie “Steady” Krc, a favorite

Austin drummer who’s kept beats for everyone from Jerry Jeff Walker

to Roky Erickson.

 

A letter sent to members earlier this month, authored by AFM’s

International Secretary Treasurer Jay Blumenthal, presented the

trusteeship as a means to restore the fiscal health of the financially

floundering union.

 

“Our local isn’t doing well financially and hasn’t been for many years,”

explains Krc, a member since 1974 who took over as president three

years ago. “There was an embezzlement issue in the Eighties and

Austin’s union, in order to remain financially solvent, had to take

out a loan from the national organization.”

 

Krc says the theft – to his understanding – resulted in Local 433

owing over $60,000 of debt, interest, and penalties to the federation.

Thus, during his tenure, the union operated on razor-thin margins.

 

“I’ve been reaching out to national for three years,” sighs Krc.
“We needed help. We didn’t get it.”

 

The federation appointed Steven Begnoche, a music educator and

performer who’s worked for Houston and San Antonio’s music unions,

as trustee for Local 433. Begnoche acknowledges it will take time to

pay down the debt. That process, he says, begins with cutting expenses, followed by direct contact with union members to educate them on

how the union can help.

 

“We take what you want to do artistically and legitimize what you

do physically,” he says. “We have contracts, pensions, and programs

– a piece of paper for everything you do whether you’re a live or

recorded music performer and everything is kept on record at the

union office for future reference.”

 

The relationship remains a basic one: If the union helps musicians

flourish financially, then Local 433 reaps dues that will decrease

the debt. Membership runs $197 annually. In Blumenthal’s letter

citing the rationale for the trusteeship, what that nets – in part –

is a “collective bargaining representative of the musicians of the

Austin Symphony Orchestra,” the ranks of which make up a large

part of the union’s 320 members.

 

Austin Symphony Executive Director Anthony Corroa says the union

doesn’t play a major role in their tri-annual contract negotiations since

the symphony’s economics are transparent and musicians always get

raises.

 

“The biggest issue with the union, and this is just my opinion, has

less to do with the Austin Symphony musicians and more to do with

all the other musicians around the city,” says Corroa. “They’re not joining

the union. Right now the club owners are taking advantage of pop and

jazz musicians. They’re not paying them anything because they don’t

have representation.”

 

Begnoche claims he can build membership by reaching out to all

members – all levels, all genres – and empower them to legitimize

their business to the extent that they can have contracts for gigs,

which will translate into revenue for the union through payment of

work dues. That’s a huge order of business considering the majority

of club gigs in Austin don’t currently involve contracts. A hearing’s

slated for 7pm, Tue., Oct. 25, at 1106 Lavaca, where all union members

will have a chance to be heard on the subject of whether the trusteeship

should be retained. With either outcome, it’s a sink or swim moment

for Local 433.

 

“It still has a lot of value to musicians and I have hope for it,” offers Krc.

“The goal of this trusteeship is to get it turned around and financially

stable. I don’t know if they can do that without forgiving the debt,

which they’ve declined to do in the past. The other option is it gets

absorbed by another local like San Antonio.

“That would be an embarrassment – if the ‘Live Music Capital of

the World’ didn’t have its own union.”

 

==============================

 

II. FORT WORTH RALLY

If you’re in the Fort Worth area, you might want to attend this event.
Please join us at a Rally for Growth Not Cuts

Fort Worth Water Gardens, 1502 Commerce St. FW 76102
Saturday October 22, 5:00 PM

Featuring a performance by the combined Brass of the
Symphony Musicians of Fort Worth and the
Musicians of the Dallas Symphony

 

=========================

 

III. EVENTS

 

DEAN AND RICHARD

DEAN AND RICHARD are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of

every month.

7:30pm-10:30pm,

11160 Washington Pl.

Culver City, 90232

310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584

NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.

Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at Viva Cantina

7:30-10:00.

900 Riverside Drive,

Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.

Come hear your favorite charts played the way they 
should

be. 

We are in the back room called the Trailside Room.

Come on down. Guaranteed to swing.

——————————–

10/22/16

DOWNEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

On Saturday, October 22, the
DOWNEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
will present the World Premiere of
“DOWNEY CELEBRATION SUITE”

8PM
DOWNEY CIVIC THEATER
8435 Firestone Drive
Downey, CA 90241
www.downeytheatre.com

composed by long-time musician and Downey resident,
Lars Clutterham.

The concert will also be part of the celebration
of Downey’s 60 years as a city, during most of which time
the Downey Symphony Orchestra has also been in existence.

——————————–

10/22/16

KIM RICHMOND AT THE DESERT ROSE

Dear fellow L.A. Musicians,
I’m back playing at the Desert Rose this coming Saturday,

October 22.

It’s been a while, but I’m back for this week only. It will be

good with a few guests sitting, and regulars Mark Z. Stevens,

Jon Mayer and Harvey Newmark. Details below. Please join us.

WHAT: Kim Richmond with the Mark Z. Stevens Trio,

plus invited guests sitting in).
WHERE: Desert Rose Restaurant,

1700 N. Hillhurst Avenue.

LOS FELIZ VILLAGE,

Los Angeles, CA 90027;

 

I suggest you call for reservations, and designate INSIDE SEATING

(to hear the band) 323) 666-1166

WHEN: This Saturday, October 22, 7 to 11 PM (3 sets)

WHO: Kim Richmond, saxophones; Jon Mayer, piano;
Harvey Newmark, bass; Mark Z. Stevens, drums

ADMISSION CHARGE: none—no cover, no minimum

FOOD: Excellent, check it out

PARKING: Valet available, street parking

——————————–

10/23/16

LOS ANGELES SYMPHONIC WINDS

Subscription Concert 1 – Calabasas High School

CITY OF ANGELS

Gala Season Opening Concert. A spectacular afternoon of inspired
music making with your LA Winds. Featured works will include
Alfred Reed’s classic “Armenian Dances”
and Maestro Piazza will be the featured soloist in John Williams’
theme music from “The Terminal.”
• Sunday October 23, 2016
• 2:30 p.m.  Performing Arts Education Center

——————————–

10/29-30/16

RESERVE YOUR SEATS NOW
OCTOBER 29th – 30th AT 7:30 PM
HARVEST MUSIC FESTIVAL 2016
Intimate Musical Soirees with
Old World Hospitality and Charm
Presenting Extraordinary Concert Artists
and Distinguished Speakers

Two Evenings of World Class Music Making
Each Concert Featuring
Unique Programming & Artists.
Tickets and Reservations are available at:
www.malibufriendsofmusic.org
or call: (310) 589-0295

Saturday, October 29th at 7:30 pm
MONTGOMERY ARTS HOUSE FOR
MUSIC AND ARCHITECTURE
Music Room
“BRINGING IN THE HARVEST”
Musical Works to Display the
Warmth of the Human Spirit
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Sunday, October 30th at 7:30 pm
MONTGOMERY ARTS HOUSE FOR
MUSIC AND ARCHITECTURE
Music Room
“SPOOKY SONORITIES”
The Sacred and Secular

(And a CRAZY Haunted House)

Featuring Harvest Festival Artists
Performing Exceptional Works of
Johannes Brahms, Gioachino Rossini,
Rebecca Clarke, William Bolcom
Bela Bartok, Max Janowski,
and Maria Newman

2016 Harvest Festival Artists:
Christina Borgioli, soprano
Diana Tash, mezzo soprano
Nandani Maria Sinha, mezzo soprano
Wendy Prober, pianist
Maria Newman, violinist and composer
Scott Hosfeld, violist
Paula Hochhalter, cellist
MASTER OF CEREMONIES:
Samuel Thatcher

For more information on the
Malibu Friends of Music
please visit: www.malibufriendsofmusic.org

Click above to enjoy this performance of the
Maria Newman’s, “The Bullfight,”
performed here by the Kairos String Quartet
~ Read the glowing review here ~
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2016/Oct/Newman_quartets_MAHMR1205208.htm

All programs, dates and artists subject to change and/or cancellation.

——————————–

11/2/16

Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts:

Wed NOVEMBER 2, 2016 at 12:10-12:40 pm
Ergo Musica Baroque Ensemble will perform
J.S. Bach’s Cantata BWV 152.

Website: http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you!
Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Glendale Noon Concerts
818-249-5108

——————————–

11/19/16

 

SFV Symphony Orchestra

Nov. 19, 2016 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Bizet: Carmen Suite #1

Bizet: Symphony in C major

Fernandez: Oboe Concerto
 – Francisco Castillo, oboist

Sibelius: Violin Concerto in D minor, 1st mvt.

Thompson Wang, violinist

 

Contact: Roberta Hoffman, publicist (ladybirdysue@aol.com)
www.sfvsymphony.com

Program information:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Other concerts in the series

Jan. 21, 2017 – Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills

Schumann: Manfred Overture

Mendelssohn: Symphony #3 in A minor (Scottish)

Belling: Music Madly Makes the World Go Round

Inaugural Performance
 Cary Belling, violinist

 

Mar. 18, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Tuttle: By Steam or By Dream Overture

Inaugural Performance

Prokofiev: Symphony #1 in D major (Classical)

Ben-Haim: Pastorale Variée for Clarinet, Harp and Strings

Geoff Nudell, clarinetist

Beethoven: Romance for Violin and Orchestra

Domine: Frankenstein Fantasy

Ruth Bruegger, violinist

 

May 13, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Saint-Saens: Bacchanale from “Samson and Delilah”

Tchaikovsky: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in C major

Egizi: Orchestral Suite

“In Memoria di Mio Padre”

Inaugural Performance

Programs subject to change

———————————–

You can read all previous offerings at:

http://www.responsible47.com

UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

LETTER TO IEB / EVENTS

Sunday, October 16th, 2016

10/15/16

I. MEMBER LETTER TO THE IEB

II. EVENTS

 

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
 scoring musician

…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician
=============================================

 

I. MEMBER LETTER TO THE IEB

The IEB/AFM are ignoring membership concerns in Los Angeles,
hoping the complaints are just going to go away….. They won’t.
——-
RE: Local 47/Club 47 Referendum

Dear Secretary-Treasurer Blumenthal,

I am writing you today because I have not received any response to correspondence sent to President Ray Hair and the International Executive Board for consideration at the July 2016 IEB Meeting.

The issues raised in my letter dated May 15, 2016 warranted serious discussion concerning the governance of Local 47 AFM in conducting it’s referendum vote.  My letter was in direct response to Pres. Ray Hair’s letter of April 24, 2016.  Ray Hair cited lack of detail regarding objections to the referendum that would allow the parent body to exercise oversight.  I think I have remedied any lack of detail by my letter of May 15, 2016.  The passage of that referendum allows Local 47/Club 47 Executive Board to divest the membership of it’s wholly owned real property in the heart of Hollywood, CA.

Please note that the letter of April 24, 2016 from Pres. Ray Hair does not disclose whether the IEB March meeting actually had any discussion or made any decision as a board on my initial letter on the same issue addressed to Ray Hair and the IEB dated February 16, 2016. That letter, as I was told by then Secretary-Treasurer Sam Folio, was set to be on the agenda for the March meeting.  In Pres. Ray Hair’s reply letter to me following the March IEB meeting, there was no indication that it had been considered by the full Board.  In addition, I have read the Minutes from the March meeting that were finally posted on the AFM website in July.  There appears to have been no discussion of the this issue.

After sending the May 15, 2016 letter, I contacted the Secretary-Treasurer’s New York office regarding it’s inclusion for the July IEB meeting.  I was told my letter had been sent directly to legal and they didn’t know if it would make the July meeting. It is now almost mid-August and I received no reply to my May 15, 2016 letter.

It does not appear that either letter of February 16, or May 15, addressed to President Ray Hair and the International Executive Board was actually reviewed or discussed by the full Board.  I would like this issue prioritized and discussed/considered by the full Board as soon as possible. (Perhaps a teleconference would be in order considering the time sensitive nature of this issue.)  I respectfully request that the decision be sent to me without delay.  This has been an ongoing issue since February 2016.

Thank you for your time and immediate attention to this matter,

Member
Local 47/Club 47 AFM

cc: Department of Labor/OLMS
Kamal Harris, California Attorney General
International Executive Board Members-Pres. Ray Hair, Jr.; Vice Pres. Bruce Fife; Vice Pres. Alan Willaert; Sec.-Treas. Jay Blumenthal; Joseph Parente; Tino Gagliardi; Dave Pomeroy; Tina Morrison; John Acosta

=========================

 

II. EVENTS

 

DEAN AND RICHARD

DEAN AND RICHARD are now at Culver City

Elks the first 
Friday of every month.
7:30pm-10;30pm,

11160 Washington Pl.

Culver City, 90232

310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584

NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.

Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at

Viva Cantina
 – 7:30-10:00.

900 Riverside Drive, Burbank.

 

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.

Come hear your favorite charts played the way they

should be. 

We are in the back room called the

Trailside Room. 

Come on down.

 

Guaranteed to swing.

——————————–

10/19/16

On Wednesday October 19, 2016 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
the Jung Trio performing
Schubert’s Piano Trio No. 2 in E flat major, Op.100,
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.

For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

The Jung Trio.
Jennie Jung – piano
Ellen Jung – violin
Julie Jung –cello
Artist website: https://jungtrio.wordpress.com

Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts series
(concerts every first & third Wednesday at 12:10-12:40 pm)
are listed at http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com

——————————–

10/23/16

LOS ANGELES SYMPHONIC WINDS

Subscription Concert 1 – Calabasas High School

CITY OF ANGELS

Gala Season Opening Concert. A spectacular afternoon of inspired
music making with your LA Winds. Featured works will include
Alfred Reed’s classic “Armenian Dances”
and Maestro Piazza will be the featured soloist in John Williams’
theme music from “The Terminal.”
• Sunday October 23, 2016
• 2:30 p.m.  Performing Arts Education Center

——————————–

10/29-30/16

RESERVE YOUR SEATS NOW
OCTOBER 29th – 30th AT 7:30 PM
HARVEST MUSIC FESTIVAL 2016
Intimate Musical Soirees with
Old World Hospitality and Charm
Presenting Extraordinary Concert Artists
and Distinguished Speakers

Two Evenings of World Class Music Making
Each Concert Featuring
Unique Programming & Artists.
Tickets and Reservations are available at:
www.malibufriendsofmusic.org
or call: (310) 589-0295

Saturday, October 29th at 7:30 pm
MONTGOMERY ARTS HOUSE FOR
MUSIC AND ARCHITECTURE
Music Room
“BRINGING IN THE HARVEST”
Musical Works to Display the
Warmth of the Human Spirit
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Sunday, October 30th at 7:30 pm
MONTGOMERY ARTS HOUSE FOR
MUSIC AND ARCHITECTURE
Music Room
“SPOOKY SONORITIES”
The Sacred and Secular

(And a CRAZY Haunted House)

Featuring Harvest Festival Artists
Performing Exceptional Works of
Johannes Brahms, Gioachino Rossini,
Rebecca Clarke, William Bolcom
Bela Bartok, Max Janowski,
and Maria Newman

2016 Harvest Festival Artists:
Christina Borgioli, soprano
Diana Tash, mezzo soprano
Nandani Maria Sinha, mezzo soprano
Wendy Prober, pianist
Maria Newman, violinist and composer
Scott Hosfeld, violist
Paula Hochhalter, cellist
MASTER OF CEREMONIES:
Samuel Thatcher

For more information on the
Malibu Friends of Music
please visit: www.malibufriendsofmusic.org

Click above to enjoy this performance of the
Maria Newman’s, “The Bullfight,”
performed here by the Kairos String Quartet
~ Read the glowing review here ~
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2016/Oct/Newman_quartets_MAHMR1205208.htm

All programs, dates and artists subject to change and/or cancellation.

——————————–

11/19/16

SFV Symphony Orchestra 
 
Nov. 19, 2016 –

Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Bizet: Carmen Suite #1
Bizet: Symphony in C major

Fernandez: Oboe Concerto
, Francisco Castillo, oboist

Sibelius: Violin Concerto in D minor, 1st mvt.

Thompson Wang, violinist

Contact: Roberta Hoffman, publicist (ladybirdysue@aol.com)
www.sfvsymphony.com

Program information:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Other concerts in the series

Jan. 21, 2017 – Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills

Schumann: Manfred Overture

Mendelssohn: Symphony #3 in A minor (Scottish)

Belling: Music Madly Makes the World Go Round

Inaugural Performance
 – Cary Belling, violinist

 

Mar. 18, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Tuttle: By Steam or By Dream Overture

Inaugural Performance

Prokofiev: Symphony #1 in D major (Classical)

Ben-Haim: Pastorale Variée for Clarinet, Harp and Strings

Geoff Nudell, clarinetist

Beethoven: Romance for Violin and Orchestra

Domine: Frankenstein Fantasy
, Ruth Bruegger, violinist

 

May 13, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Saint-Saens: Bacchanale from “Samson and Delilah”

Tchaikovsky: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in C major

Egizi: Orchestral Suite “In Memoria di Mio Padre”

Inaugural Performance

 
Programs subject to change

———————————–

 

You can read all previous offerings at:http://www.responsible47.com

UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

DOJ RULING / POP CULTURE / EVENTS

Saturday, October 8th, 2016

10/9/16
I. DOJ RULING: WHAT HAPPENS NOW?
II. WHAT’S LOST WHEN POPS ORCHESTRAS TAP POP CULTURE

III. EVENTS

 

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician

…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician
=============================================

I. DOJ RULING: WHAT HAPPENS NOW?
A couple of Tuesdays ago the SCL (Society of Composers and Lyricists)

hosted a meeting at the Crest in Westwood to discuss the recent

DOJ Ruling. What follows are notes taken at the meeting.

ON THE OVERTURNING OF THE DOJ RULING

THE DOJ RULING: BMI Prevailed,… What Happens Now
September 20th, 2016 – 6pm

CREST THEATER
Panalists:
1) Ashley Erwin – Pres. SCL
2) Todd Brabec
3) Michael Eames
4) Garry Schyman
5) Charles J. Sanders

BMI went to get an extension on the DOJ ruling to keep it

from being put in force, but the court came up with a decision….

And overturned the earlier decision in BMI’s favor.

CONSENT DECREE

SOME HISTORY
1917 – ASMAC created
1949 – BMI created
1930’s – Government looked at ASCAP’s actions. ASCAP’s

POWER WAS HUGE

1941 – both ASCAP / BMI put under decrees that limits

how they operate.
ASCAP had EXCLUSIVE rights to their members. Sign

with them, only THEY can license your work.
BMI – Was the same deal.

 

Have been amendments over the decades.

ASCAP / BMI – had to treat similarly positioned composers alike.
Court in 1950 – ASCAP must have a rate court in case writer and others cannot
agree on a rate.
1994 – BMI created a rate court.
Different judges for each organization.

Gives users and pros a recourse if they cannot agree on a fee.

They have interim fees.
In most cases interim rate is very low.

2001 Decree – Sped up some of the rate courts.

Millions of dollars spent on these rate courts.

Since the online world came in – ALL THE SERVICES have

gone to rate court to cut down on the fees to be paid.

PANDORA was the first case where they got a decent rate.

 

Consent decree is 75 years old.

 

Composers are the least represented of all artists.
If record company owns the publisher, they try for the lowest

fee possible. (If there was no floor, the rate would be zero)

Companies want a universal one-size-fits-all rate.

Full work licensing – Is it a buyout? Who gets the benefit?

DOJ was asked by those who want to deflect from having to

pay fair royalties.

Theory of why it came up – Who ran the investigation?

Someone from silicone valley who used to work for Google

as an anti-trust counsel.

 

No longer talking about changing consent, now talking

about FULL WORK LICENSING.

 

Cannot get back to talking about changing consent until

we’re done talking about full work licensing.  After this is

done we’re back to where we started. The full work licensing

has been a very effective delaying tactic.

 

Consent decrees artificially suppress fair royalty fees.

 

We went asking for relieve from consent decree, and the

DOJ went after another angle. (Full Work Licensing)

During Pandora Case –
Big publishers wanted to withdraw part of their works

from the online world only.

ASCAP/BMI wanted to bundle rights.
ASCAP/BMI wanted to replace rate court with an arbitration.

DOJ asked for comments
Amenable to bundling
Amenable to partial work withdrawal
Totally against replacing the rate court.

How is the WFH creator’s relationship with a publisher

different to that of a traditional songwriter.

How would full work licensing affect WFH composers and

songwriters.

Employee and independent contractors, both have rights.
Composers inhabit a third category.

Employees: Collective bargaining – salary, working conditions
Independent contractors: allows ownership, no benefits.
Composers: Considered to be Independent Contractors by NLRB
Work for Hire was created in the 1976 copyright act.
Employer took ownership of the music. Composer sued.
It led to the dissolution of the composers union.

Certificate of authorship – grants ownership to the studio –

composers become in effect an employee without any of

the benefits. Composers are allowed to collect 50% of the
fees collected, representing the “Writer’s Share”.

What we want – Writer’s Share included in statue of the law.

Writer’s share does not appear in any statute. We want it

incorporated into copyright law.

 

We all reach out to local representatives. SCL will come up

with a letter to send.

 

SONA – Songwriters of North America – Sued to give voice to

the songwriter in this fight. Found pro-bono lawyers.

Everyone in Washington needs to see that these actions are

affecting the smallest of the smallest business owners.

 

SONA Suing the DOJ saying it has hurt their property rights.

 

Hard to get congress members to understand what’s at stake

and the subtleties of copy write law.

Meeting Adjourned

 

[EC: If anyone finds this synopsis incomplete or incorrect,

please send in your corrections and we’ll be more than happy

to include it in the next blog.]

=========================

II. WHAT’S LOST WHEN POPS ORCHESTRAS TAP POP CULTURE
New York Times August 24th, 2016
by Brian Wise

Tchaikovsky’s bombastic “1812 Overture” has been a staple of the Boston Pops’ Fourth of July concert since 1974, when the famed Pops conductor Arthur Fiedler added it — complete with cannon blasts and church bells — to lift attendance. It became the traditional lead-in to the fireworks display over the Charles River.
But that changed over the past decade, as CBS began broadcasting the show and the “1812 Overture” was moved earlier in the evening, before the nationally televised portion began. The prime-time pyrotechnics this year instead used hits by Adele, Beyoncé, Justin Bieber and others as a soundtrack. Some traditionalists took to social media to vent their dismay.

“Nice they let the Pops play ONE song at their own concert,” one viewer wrote in a sarcastic tweet, adding, “And #1812Overture relegated to commercial break.”
“For first time in 40 years #BostonPops doesn’t play 1812 Overture, opting instead for crass top-40 dreck. Pathetic sellout,” another wrote on Twitter.
“I agree with a lot of that reaction,” Keith Lockhart, the orchestra’s conductor since 1995, said in an interview. “The network has very specific ideas about the demographic that they want to attract, which may not jibe with our ideas about the demographic that is going to get the most out of this, and have the best relationship with the Boston Pops.”

There is a fundamental challenge facing pops orchestras and series, which tend to have audiences older than classical ones. As music directors and administrators try various approaches to connect with new audiences — adding film screenings with live orchestral accompaniment, video game soundtracks, theatrical circus spectacles and 1990s rock acts — are they abandoning the large repertory that drew many listeners in the first place?

What is disappearing, some say, are the light classics that once were staples of mainstream classical concerts that, around the middle of the last century, migrated to pops: Rossini overtures, Liszt’s “Hungarian Rhapsodies,” Respighi’s “Fountains of Rome,” Bach transcriptions and other colorful showpieces.
“If you’re going to do a Mahler symphony as the centerpiece of a concert,” said John Mauceri, the founding director of the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, “you don’t have any room for von Suppé or Offenbach.”

The average age of a Boston Pops subscriber is 55 — compared with 48 for subscribers to its parent ensemble, the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The Pops has been turning more and more to headliners with multigenerational appeal, such as the comedian and singer Seth MacFarlane and contestants from “Dancing With the Stars.” Last week, the St. Louis Symphony followed orchestras in Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio, by booking the rapper Nelly. The National Symphony Orchestra has drawn much attention for performances with Kendrick Lamar and Nas: far from fluffy Strauss waltzes.

“There’s kind of a lost repertoire,” Mr. Lockhart said. “As pops orchestras have begun to chase an increasingly nonclassical audience, that material is woefully underrepresented in a lot of places. It’s even represented less here than it was when I first started,” he said, referring to the Boston Pops.

These changes have decades-old roots. In 2004, Henry Fogel, then president of the League of American Orchestras, wrote an article for the league’s Symphony magazine documenting the fading of once-popular works like Smetana’s tone poem “The Moldau” and Chabrier’s flamenco-tinged “España.” Comparing classical subscription programs of six major American orchestras from the early 1920s through 2001, he showed how light classics had nearly disappeared by 1960.

“The development of pops as a separate thing actually hurt orchestras,” Mr. Fogel said in a telephone interview. “It tended to remove some of the music whose principal reason for existence is pure entertainment.” He placed some of the blame on music critics, who often dismissed tuneful pieces like Enescu’s Romanian Rhapsodies, and on conductors, who were afraid of being branded as mere entertainers.

Some orchestras devoted to pops, including the New York Pops and Cincinnati Pops, continue to mix light classics with American songbook standards and film music. But others, like the Philly Pops, have abruptly changed course. When Michael Krajewski became that ensemble’s music director in 2013, he jettisoned light classics for pop- and rock-themed programs, which this season will include tributes to the Beatles and 1970s arena bands. Sarah Maiellano, a spokeswoman for the Philly Pops, credited this overhaul with a 64 percent increase in subscriptions since 2014. Concerts at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia sold at 96 percent capacity last season.

A similar tactic has been used at the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, which has a history of championing contemporary American music. Last year, its pops series sold at 85 percent capacity, compared with 73 percent for its classical series; orchestra officials partly credit the higher pops sales to headliners such as the country band Alabama.

“Pops is a way to bring in money, but we also look at it as a way to bring in new audiences,” said Larry Tucker, the orchestra’s vice president for artistic administration, who has a lead role in overseeing concert programming. (Research from the League of American Orchestras shows that audiences seldom cross over from pops to classical concerts, but pops concerts, which involve fewer rehearsals, are known to subsidize classical series.)

The New York Philharmonic is one of several major orchestras without a pops series, though its Summertime Classics concerts, which ran from 2004 to 2014, harkened back to the Fiedler model of pops repertory. The series was discontinued not because of poor ticket sales but because of touring obligations, said Edward Yim, the Philharmonic’s vice president for artistic planning, who works with the music director Alan Gilbert to plan concerts. “It would be nice to see some of that repertoire sprinkled throughout our main subscription series,” he added. “Not every subscription concert, week in and week out, should be so deadly serious.”

The Philharmonic has drawn large audiences by showing films with live accompaniment; popular performances in May of Charlie Chaplin’s “City Lights” and Disney’s “Fantasia: Live in Concert” were added after the season had already begun. The orchestra has started to spin off touring editions of films from its Art of the Score series, renting the production elements to other orchestras.
The pilot installment, “On the Waterfront,” featuring a score by Leonard Bernstein, had its premiere in New York last September and will be presented this season by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the San Francisco Symphony. A similar distribution strategy is planned for a restored version of Woody Allen’s “Manhattan,” its soundtrack dotted with brassy Gershwin melodies that will be conducted by Mr. Gilbert on Sept. 16 and 17 at David Geffen Hall.

As these film programs multiply (current favorites of concert presenters include “Home Alone” and “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” according to the online directory Movies in Concert), conductors and artistic administrators say they struggle to find room for the traditional light orchestral numbers. But Steven Reineke, the National Symphony’s principal pops conductor, doesn’t plan to abandon those older pops staples. “To play those types of pieces as preludes or interspersed throughout the programming,” he said, “I don’t see them disappearing.”

(more…)

EXECUTIVE SESSION / EVENTS

Saturday, October 1st, 2016

10/1/16
I. WHAT IS EXECUTIVE SESSION?

II. EVENTS

 

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician

…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician
===========================================

 

I. WHAT IS EXECUTIVE SESSION?

No information has been forthcoming from the board concerning
the building sale. Last we heard, the building had fallen out of escrow
not once, but twice.

A member who attends the board meetings has found that the building
has only been discussed in executive session. When asked about the
building or the status of the sale, the standard answer now is “We cannot
discuss anything that happens in executive session”.

So the question arises, is the board using executive session as

an excuse to keep the membership that cares in the dark?

Perhaps the use of executive session for the building discussion

is legit,….

“An executive session is a term for any block within an otherwise open meeting (often of a board of directors) in which minutes are taken separately, outsiders are not present, and the contents of the discussion are treated as confidential (see in camera).[7]

In a deliberative assembly, an executive session has come to mean that the proceedings are secret and members could be punished for violating the secrecy.[8] The business that is conducted in executive session could include legal issues, formation of contracts, disciplinary
hearings, or personnel issues.”

So can the local choose to discuss the building only in executive session? Certainly. Is it of such a sensitive nature that it MUST be discussed in executive session and the membership be kept in the

dark? Not in all cases.

However, since the membership has shown again and again that

they simply don’t care, or don’t care enough to speak of it in public

for fear of some imaginary blacklisting, (The work is gone for

most, what’s to blacklist?)

 

Perhaps it doesn’t really matter.

 

=========================

 

II. EVENTS

DEAN AND RICHARD

DEAN AND RICHARD

are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of

every month.

7:30pm-10;30pm,

11160 Washington Pl. 
Culver City, 90232

310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584

NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.

Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at Viva Cantina
 7:30-10:00.

900 Riverside Drive, Burbank.

 

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl. 
Come hear your favorite charts played the way they 
should be. 

We are in the

back room called the Trailside Room.

Come on down. Guaranteed to swing.

—————————————

10/2/16

DON’T MISS THE
THE PHIL NORMAN TENTET
PERFORMANCE OF
“THEN & NOW”

Sunday, October 2nd
7:30 pm (doors open @ 6:00 pm)
Catalina Jazz Club
6725 Sunset Boulevard
Hollywood, California 90028
Reservations call 323-466-2210

Click this link to make a reservation online: Catalina Bar & Grill

Remembering the classic sounds & variations of
12 jazz legends to include:

The George Shearing Quintet
The Dave Brubeck Quartet
The Modern Jazz Quartet
The Cal Tjader Quintet
the Ahmad Jamal Trio
Miles, Dizzy and more

————————————

10/5/16

FREE ADMISSION GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS

On Wednesday October 5, 2016 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
Violinist Elbert Tsai and
Pianist Jennie Jung

in a program, “The Performer as Composer as Transcriber,”
featuring works by Mozart, Kreisler and Mason Bates
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

Elbert Tsai leads a multifaceted career as virtuoso violinist,

sought-after pedagogue, and orchestral musician. As a soloist,

one of his musical missions is to revive the art of the virtuoso

violin recital, which celebrates the short showpieces and gems

of the instrument’s 450-year musical history. Since 2007, he

has performed with the San Francisco Ballet orchestra and

San Francisco Symphony, touring with the symphony domestically

and to Europe and Asia.

 

Elbert has taught violin and chamber music at Center Stage Strings,

the Luzerne Music Center, San Francisco Conservatory of Music,

SFCM Pre-College Division, and the Crowden School. He holds

degrees from University of Southern California, Rice University,

and Oberlin College.

Jennie Jung made her debut with the Pittsburgh Symphony

Orchestra at the age of eleven and has since been active as both

a soloist and collaborator in North America. Dr. Jung has

performed with the Republic of Tatarstan Symphony, Korean Philharmonic, Taejon Symphony, Korean-Canadian, University

of Toronto, Hart House, and Cathedral Bluffs Symphony Orchestras. She has attended festivals including the Taubman Institute of Piano,

the Banff Centre for the Arts, and the Music Academy of the West, Santa Barbara. As a collaborative pianist, Dr. Jung has performed

in North America, Asia, Africa, and Europe, and has been on staff

at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria, Aspen Summer Music

Festival, Gregor Piatigorsky Seminar for Cellists, and the Banff

Centre for the Arts. Dr. Jung has participated in master classes

and studied with artists such as Dalton Baldwin, Anne Epperson,

Peter Frankl, Margo Garrett, Martin Katz, Anton Kuerti, Robert MacDonald, Karl Ulrich-Schnabel, and Arie Vardi.
Dr. Jung is a member of the Jung Trio with her sisters Ellen (violin)

and Julie (cello). The Jung Trio was the Grand Prize winner at the

2002 Yellow Springs Chamber Music Competition and was awarded

the Bronze Medal at the 2002 Fischoff Chamber Music Competition.

The Trio has attended numerous festivals and workshops, including

the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival, Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, the Orford Arts Centre Festival, and the Banff Centre for

the Arts. Past performances include recitals in Korea, Los Angeles,

New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Toronto, and a concert tour of Kenya and Mauritius as representatives of the Korean Kumho

Cultural Foundation. The Jung Trio has performed Beethoven’s

Triple Concerto with orchestras in Russia, Korea, Toronto, and

Los Angeles. Their recording of Dvořák’s Piano Trio in F Minor

was recently released by the Groovenote Label on LP and SACD.

 

In 2009, the Trio made its European debut in Berlin, Germany,

and at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. In October, 2009, the

Trio presented its second benefit concert for the Susan G. Komen

for the Cure, and in March, 2010, organized Promise for Haiti, a

concert raising funds for Promise Child and its Haiti mission.
Dr. Jung has received degrees from the University of Toronto, Yale University, and The Juilliard School. She maintains a private piano studio and is on faculty at the Claremont Graduate University,

Pomona College, and the Colburn Community School of Performing Arts.

——————————–

10/19/16

San Fernando Valley Symphony Orchestra 
 
Nov. 19, 2016 –

Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

 

Bizet: Carmen Suite #1
Bizet: Symphony in C major

Fernandez: Oboe Concerto
, Francisco Castillo, oboist

Sibelius: Violin Concerto in D minor, 1st mvt.

Thompson Wang, violinist

Contact: Roberta Hoffman, publicist (ladybirdysue@aol.com)
www.sfvsymphony.com
 
Program information:

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Other concerts in the series

 

Jan. 21, 2017 – Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills

Schumann: Manfred Overture

Mendelssohn: Symphony #3 in A minor (Scottish)

Belling: Music Madly Makes the World Go Round

Inaugural Performance

Cary Belling, violinist

 

Mar. 18, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Tuttle: By Steam or By Dream Overture

Inaugural Performance

Prokofiev: Symphony #1 in D major (Classical)

Ben-Haim: Pastorale Variée for Clarinet, Harp and Strings

Geoff Nudell, clarinetist

Beethoven: Romance for Violin and Orchestra

Domine: Frankenstein Fantasy
 – Ruth Bruegger, violinist

 

May 13, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Saint-Saens: Bacchanale from “Samson and Delilah”

Tchaikovsky: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in C major

Egizi: Orchestral Suite “In Memoria di Mio Padre”

Inaugural Performance

Programs subject to change
———————————–

You can read all previous offerings at:

http://www.responsible47.com

 

UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47