Archive for December, 2017

SAN ANTONIO SYMPHONY / DEVELOPS / COMMENT / EVENTS

Friday, December 29th, 2017

 

12/29/17

I. SAN ANTONIO SYMPHONY MANAGEMENT GROUP DEAL OFF
II. SAN ANTONIO STORY DEVELOPS
III. COMMENT
IV. EVENTS

HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM THE COMMITTEE!!

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

 

================================

 

I. MANAGEMENT GROUP BACKS OUT OF DEAL TO
TAKE OVER SAN ANTONIO SYMPHONY

 

FROM TEXAS PUBLIC RADIO

A nonprofit organization created to run the San Antonio
Symphony announced Wednesday it will no longer take
over the troubled orchestra due to a potential multimillion
dollar pension obligation.

 

Symphonic Music for San Antonio Chairman Bruce Bugg
Jr. said the musicians’ union — the American Federation of
Musicians — told him of an underfunded pension obligation
of more than $4 million. Now, the management group has
decided to hand back responsibility to the Symphony Society
of San Antonio, which managed the symphony since its creation
in 1939.

“We’ve contributed over $2 million since May of this year just to
keep the symphonic season going,” Bugg said. “Those funds
went to pay the salaries of musicians and other expenses.”

Symphonic Music was created on July 19 with the intent of taking
over the symphony’s business operations Aug. 31. That is, until
an audit uncovered an unexpected cost, Bugg said.

“How we got to where we find ourselves today is we had asked
for the audited financial statements of the Symphony Society
of San Antonio for the period ending Aug. 31, 2016,” he said.

“That audit showed zero mention of any [underfunded] pension
balances.”…

We made it clear from the beginning that we were not in the
position at (Symphonic Music) to assume liabilities. We were
only in a position to move forward.”

Alice Viroslav, chairman of the Symphony Society of San Antonio,
confirmed the shortfall, citing a dip in the stock market and
possible mismanagement of the pension.
“So everyone in the pension is underfunded,” she said. “The
pension is a huge multi-employer plan. And the pension itself
has lost over 40 percent in overall value in the stock market in
2008 and never fully recovered from that.

“And there’s actually an active lawsuit right now against the
pension itself by some AFM musicians because exactly the
issues that we’re talking about. So this has nothing to do with
anything that we did. This has to do with the overall management
of the pension fund.”

Meanwhile, Craig Sorgi, a member of the San Antonio Symphony
and union chairman, sent a news release late Wednesday in
response to Bugg and Symphonic Music’s decision that it will no
longer manage the symphony due to the pension obligation.

“The board members of Symphonic Music for San Antonio are
attempting to excuse their abandonment of the San Antonio
Symphony by using the AFM pension plan as their scapegoat.
This is a false excuse,” the statement read. “… The SMSA board
members spent months proclaiming themselves the saviors of
the San Antonio Symphony. Now, like spoiled children, they have
decided to pick up their marbles and leave because they couldn’t
get their way on everything, including having to deal with a pesky
Union that didn’t think reducing outstandingly skilled musicians’
already-low pay scales was a very good idea.”

———————————–

COMMENTS RELATED TO THE ARTICLE ABOVE:

Something stinks, and it ain’t in Denmark. 1st we have a thinly
disguised attempt by the Tobin Center to get the symphony to
do their bidding and get rid of the pesky conflicts that have been
plaguing them from the get-go, and now we have them dropping
the deal like a hot rock, right after talks with the union fail. Since
they’ve known about the “unfunded liability: for a month — during
the negotiations, mind you — I question the real reason for their
sudden and unconscionable withdrawal from their obligations
which were self-imposed in the first place.

I foresee a long and ugly lawsuit on the horizon. And sadly,
a city without a symphony.

 

————————–

 

WAIT a second…..!
Why did Bruce Bugg and SMSA sit on this information for a
month? They learned of the so-called underfunded pension
on November 21.

Why is it news…One Month Later??

————————–

 

I see one big problem in the above quotes from Bruce
Bugg and Alice Viroslav:
“Unfunded” and “underfunded” are not the same thing.
Is this a deliberate slip of the tongue, or careless wording
by the chairman of SMSA?

 

====================================

 

II. SAN ANTONIO STORY DEVELOPS
Symphony musicians hope for last-minute agreement
By Steve Bennett
December 28, 2017 Updated: December 28, 2017 8:22pm

With the San Antonio Symphony musicians’ contract set to expire Sunday,
an orchestra representative said next week’s Tricentennial celebration
concerts are up in the air.

While hanging onto hope that labor talks will continue, musicians on
Thursday also blasted a nonprofit group that was expected to assume
orchestra management for what they called “a union-busting power play.”

“At this point, we plan to be at rehearsal on Jan. 3,” said symphony
violinist Craig Sorgi, negotiating chairman of the Musicians of the
San Antonio Symphony. “There have been no cancellations, no work
stoppages, and there is still time on the clock to come to an agreement.
It’s not impossible.”

San Antonio supermarket chain H-E-B, the Tobin Endowment
and the Kronkosky Charitable Foundation set up the nonprofit
Symphonic Music for San Antonio and announced plans in
July to take over the symphony’s assets and operations
from the 78-year-old symphony society by Sept. 1.

The group announced Wednesday that it had pulled out of
the deal, citing a $4 million liability related to the musicians’
pension fund, which it said was disclosed recently in a letter
from the American Federation of Musicians & Employers’
Pension Fund.

San Antonio supermarket chain H-E-B, the Tobin Endowment
and the Kronkosky Charitable Foundation set up the nonprofit
Symphonic Music for San Antonio and announced plans in
July to take over the symphony’s assets and operations from
the 78-year-old symphony society by Sept. 1.

The group announced Wednesday that it had pulled out of the
deal, citing a $4 million liability related to the musicians’ pension
fund, which it said was disclosed recently in a letter from the
American Federation of Musicians & Employers’ Pension Fund.

Bruce Bugg, chairman of Symphonic Music for San Antonio,
acknowledged on Thursday that he made a mistake in citing the
number, which was a reference to the multiemployer pension’s
net unfunded vested benefits of $4.5 billion.

The symphony musicians had pointed out the mistake in a
statement released Thursday.
“The pension fund letter identifies a $4.5 billion number for the
fund’s total net unfunded vested benefits aggregated of all
participating employers nationwide and all participating
employees nationwide,” according to the statement.
“This is not a liability figure of the (Symphony Society
of San Antonio).”

However, Bugg insisted the symphony society was potentially
liable for $8.9 million, which the letter identifies as an
“estimated withdrawal liability,” and that it remains a
deal-breaker.

“I don’t see a path forward working with the symphony
society, given what has been exposed in this letter,” he said.

Musicians countered that the figure was “grossly false.”

“Right now, there is no debt that the symphony society
owes the pension fund,” said symphony bassoonist Brian
Petkovich, secretary-treasurer of the local musicians’ union.
“The annual payment that the symphony society makes
to the fund is $120,000, which is such a small part of the
symphony’s budget (of $7.6 million). That shouldn’t
keep the orchestra from being onstage.”

Alice B. Viroslav, a San Antonio physician recently elected
board chairwoman of the symphony society, also said the
symphony is not in debt to the pension fund.

“The pension penalty is solely related to the shortfall of the
overall pension fund,” she wrote in an email. “The symphony
was and has always been current on all payments to the pension.”

Chicago arts consultant Drew McManus said the pension
fund liabilities did not mean that the symphony society
was “in arrears.”

“Withdrawal liabilities only kick in when you pull out of
the fund,” he said.

A symphony society board meeting to discuss all these matters
is scheduled for Tuesday.

“Really, were in a wait-and-see mode right now for what
the other side is going to do,” Petkovich said.

As far as next week’s and upcoming concerts, he added,
“We’re really up in the air.”

—————————————————-

III. COMMENT
interesting story & comments at
https://www.facebook.com/scoringsessions/ about
Local 47 falsely accusing a company of doing
a non-union session. Thoughts?

 

—————————————————

 

IV. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

 

——————————————-

 

The Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program at the Seattle Film Institute

is now accepting applications for the one-year

Master of Music in Film Composition

One of the Top 4 Film Music Programs in the World!

Recently rated as the #4 school in the world for film scoring education by Music School Central.

“in just one year, the school places students into a pressure cooker of intense learning resulting in a professional demo reel that can be used to obtain future paid commercial opportunities.”

 

Learn from Industry Professionals

All PNWFS faculty are active professional film and game composers, orchestrators, copyists, and engineers, including the program’s creator and lead instructor Dr. Hummie Mann.  Hummie is the two-time Emmy Award winning film composer of “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” and featured in Variety Magazine’s article “Leaders in Learning”.

Our Program Features:
• 9 live recording sessions with professional musicians at Studio X, Seattle’s premiere, world-class studio.
• Opportunities to work with student directors to score actual films from film programs all over the world.
• 
Training in all major software programs used in the industry.
• 
A state-of-the-art workstation assigned to each student fully installed with the latest versions of all software, sample libraries and plug-ins needed to complete the program.

 

Accelerated and Affordable

We are a one-year Master of Music in Film Composition program which not only gives our graduates the opportunity to enter the industry and start their careers a year sooner than other programs but saves them an entire year of living expenses. In addition to our accelerated format we also offer the most affordable tuition out of competing programs. Our students have access to FAFSA financial assistance, loans, and scholarships as well.

 

History of Success

We are very proud to have a high success rate for our graduates who have gone on to work on television shows such as Castle, Empire, and Once Upon a Time; video games such as World of Warcraft, Spate, and Destiny; and films such as The Revenant, Trolls, The Dark Tower, and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Apply now and you could be joining their ranks!

Applications are being accepted for the Fall 2018 school year.
We offer rolling admissions – no deadline to apply.

 

 

(800) 882-4734 | www.pnwfilmmusic.com
——————————————–

UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

Friday, December 22nd, 2017

 

12/22/17

 

I. TRUSTEES ENDORSE ACT FOLLOWING PRESSURE
II. EVENTS

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE COMMITTEE!!

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

 

================================

 

I.TRUSTEES ENDORSE BUTCH LEWIS ACT
Thanks to Pressure from AFM Members

Yesterday evening the AFM-EPF trustees sent out
an email informing plan participants of their decision
to support the Butch Lewis Act. We want to
commend the trustees for finally acting on what
is in the best interest of all plan participants.

MPS first approached the trustees about Senator
Sherrod Brown’s then pension proposal as far
back as July. In October, we asked the trustees
to allow Senator Brown’s actuaries to analyze
the AFM-EPF plan data to show the benefits his
proposal would have on our fund. After meeting
with Senator Brown’s staff on November 2, it still
took another seven weeks for the AFM-EPF
trustees to decide that the Butch Lewis Act
would help our troubled pension fund.

Supporting the Butch Lewis Act is a step in
the right direction for the AFM-EPF trustees.
However, plan participants must continue to
hold the trustees accountable for their actions
both past and present. In 2014 when our
trustees helped write and pass MPRA (the
law that allows trustees to cut existing
benefits) they were actively engaged in
Washington D.C. lobbying on behalf of
the legislation and spent money to support
its passage. We must demand that in the
coming weeks our AFM-EPF trustees
publicly show that same level of support
for the Butch Lewis Act.

Recently, MPS joined with many important
unions and multi-employer pension plans to
oppose the efforts of the NCCMP and others
to undermine the Butch Lewis Act with
“composite plan” legislation. (See the coalition
statement here) The composite plan proposal
was part of the original MPRA proposal in
2014, but didn’t make it into the final law.
NCCMP has been pursuing it ever since.
In the last few weeks, they have dramatically
ramped up their efforts. Moving forward,
MPS will again reach out to the AFM-EPF
trustees in hopes of working together to find
new ways in which we can support the Butch
Lewis Act. First, we will ask the trustees to
join MPS and sign on to the coalition statement
disavowing the composite proposal because
it is not in the interests of the plan participants
of AFM-EPF.

MPS wants to thank all the AFM members
across the country who are actively engaged
in the fight to protect our pension. Whether
it was talking to a colleague at intermission
or calling Ray Hair’s office it was your hard
work, your organizing, your phone calls, and
your emails that created the pressure which
led our trustees to finally act. For many years,
our trustees pursued and supported MPRA.
Now, because of your efforts, our trustees
are forced to seriously consider new
legislative solutions in Washington D.C., like
the Butch Lewis Act, that don’t start with
cuts to benefits.

Since MPS was founded, it has been our
mission to bring together AFM musicians
across the country in search of more
information about the state of our pension
and, ultimately, to demand more
transparency and accountability from
the AFM-EPF Trustees. With your input
and participation, we have become a
national force working towards a
sustainable long-term plan for a secure
pension.

The coming weeks will show plan
participants just how serious the
AFM-EPF trustees are in supporting
the Butch Lewis Act.

====================================

II. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

 

——————————————-

 

The Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program at the Seattle Film Institute

is now accepting applications for the one-year

Master of Music in Film Composition

One of the Top 4 Film Music Programs in the World!

Recently rated as the #4 school in the world for film scoring education by Music School Central.

“in just one year, the school places students into a pressure cooker of intense learning resulting in a professional demo reel that can be used to obtain future paid commercial opportunities.”

 

Learn from Industry Professionals

All PNWFS faculty are active professional film and game composers, orchestrators, copyists, and engineers, including the program’s creator and lead instructor Dr. Hummie Mann.  Hummie is the two-time Emmy Award winning film composer of “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” and featured in Variety Magazine’s article “Leaders in Learning”.

Our Program Features:
• 9 live recording sessions with professional musicians at Studio X, Seattle’s premiere, world-class studio.
• Opportunities to work with student directors to score actual films from film programs all over the world.
• 
Training in all major software programs used in the industry.
• 
A state-of-the-art workstation assigned to each student fully installed with the latest versions of all software, sample libraries and plug-ins needed to complete the program.

 

Accelerated and Affordable

We are a one-year Master of Music in Film Composition program which not only gives our graduates the opportunity to enter the industry and start their careers a year sooner than other programs but saves them an entire year of living expenses. In addition to our accelerated format we also offer the most affordable tuition out of competing programs. Our students have access to FAFSA financial assistance, loans, and scholarships as well.

History of Success

We are very proud to have a high success rate for our graduates who have gone on to work on television shows such as Castle, Empire, and Once Upon a Time; video games such as World of Warcraft, Spate, and Destiny; and films such as The Revenant, Trolls, The Dark Tower, and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Apply now and you could be joining their ranks!

Applications are being accepted for the Fall 2018 school year.
We offer rolling admissions – no deadline to apply.

 

 

(800) 882-4734 | www.pnwfilmmusic.com
——————————————–

UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

WORST RETURNS / SPENDING / AFM BLATHER / COMMENTS / EVENTS

Saturday, December 16th, 2017

 

12/16/17

I. AFM RETURNS WORST IN CLASS
II. AFM SPENDING MORE PENSION DOLLARS
III. AFM’S LATEST ON THE SUBJECT
IV. COMMENTS
V. EVENTS

HAPPY THANKSGIVING FROM THE COMMITTEE!

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

 

================================

 

I. AFM RETURNS WORST IN CLASS

How the AFM-EPF’s Investment Fees
Actually Measure Up

When the trustees recently made a major statement about
how low the AFM-EPF’s investment fees are, we checked it out.

EXPENSES
As we know all too well, the trustees spin the facts,
especially when assessing their own performance.
Everything they say must be checked thoroughly.
So, when the trustees recently made a major statement
about how low the AFM-EPF’s investment fees are,
we checked it out. And not surprisingly, we found
their statement failed to tell the whole story.

In their December 9 email, they point out that
their investment fees compare favorably with
averages contained in a broad industry study
performed by Greenwich Associates. Since
the Greenwich Associates study is only
available to high paying subscribers (and
that does not include MPS), we thought we
would simply compare the AFM-EPF
investment expenses to the peer group in
the entertainment industry.[1] In any event,
we think the peer comparison provides a
more accurate measurement than a broad,
ill-defined industry study.

We took the industry standard measurement,
which is the ratio of investment fees[2] to
assets under management. It turns out
that AFM-EPF investment fees are 84.3%
higher than the mean[3] for the entertainment
industry peer group:

AFTRA: 0.36 Investment/Assets (%)
DG: 0.25 Investment/Assets (%)
IATSE: 0.024 Investment/Assets (%)
PW: 0.21 Investment/Assets (%)
SAG: 0.78 Investment/Assets (%)
(MEAN): 0.25 Investment/Assets (%)

AFM: 0.615 Investment/Assets (%)

 

We also looked at how AFM-EPF compares
with our sister fund in Canada, The Musicians
Pension Fund, which is affiliated with the
AFM. The investment fees of the AFM-EPF are
78% higher than our Canadian sister fund.

MUSICIANS PENSION FUND OF CANADA:
0.27 Investment Fees/Assets (%)
AFM: 0.615 Investment Fees/Assets (%)

 

To get one more relevant comparison, we
looked at the investment fees for an index
fund like Vanguard. The investment fees
of the AFM-EPF are 175% higher than
Vanguard’s:

VANGUARD: 0.04 Investment Fees/Assets (%)
AFM: 0.615: Investment Fees/Assets (%)

We need to remember that all these investment
fees paid out by AFM-EPF produced worse
performance than any of the funds cited
above. To take one example, the 10-year
annual average return earned by the Vanguard
passive index was 6.83%. [4] The 10-year
annual average return at AFM-EPF was 3.2%.
Overpaying for investment fees has a corrosive
effect on investment returns, especially over
long time horizons. Here’s a good explanation
of this phenomenon from Vanguard:

“Investment costs might not seem like a
big deal but they add up, compounding
along with your investment returns. In
other words, you don’t just lose the tiny
amount of fees you pay, you also lose
all the growth that money might have
had for years into the future. Imagine
you have $100,000 invested. If the
account earns 6% a year for the next 2
5 years and had no costs or fees, you
end up with about $430,000. If on
the other hand you pay 2% a year in
costs, after 25 years you’d only have
about $260,000. That’s right: the 2%
you paid every year would wipe out
almost 40 percent of your final account
value. 2% doesn’t sound so small
anymore does it?”[5]

Our trustees refuse to acknowledge that
the AFM-EPF has an expense problem.
As we have previously pointed out (see
prior post here), the AFM-EPF has
multiple layers of investment managers.
First, they have two investment consultants
who are taking substantial fees for their
overall management of the fund. These
two firms choose no less than 25 outside
investment managers, each of whom take
a cut of the assets under management.
Then under these 25 managers, there
are often sub-managers who take a further
cut. On top of all that expense, AFM-EPF
pension plan has a full staff of over 70
people, headed by an executive who
earns $425,000 per year. Given the layers
of consultants, outside managers, sub-
managers, and the full in-house staff, it
is no wonder that the AFM-EPF pays by
far the most expensive investment fees
in the relevant peer group, and has returns
that are worst in class.

===================================

II. AFM-EPF Trustees Find New Ways to Spend Your
Pension Dollars
DC Pollster Hired to Run Focus Groups

Participants in the AFM-EPF Pension Plan have recently
begun receiving e-mails from Geoff Garen, President of
the well-known Washington DC polling and political
strategy firm Hart Associates. They are offering $100
to musicians to participate in focus groups: “We believe
the insights you possess and the experiences you have
had would be extremely valuable to the Fund as it seeks
to better understand the perspective of plan participants
and to provide them with helpful and timely information
about the fund.”

So, who is Geoff Garen, and why is he being paid with
our hard earned and scarce pension dollars?

Geoff Garen is a pollster and political strategist who
has worked on the campaigns of many Democratic
politicians, including Hillary Clinton, Chuck Schumer,
Dick Durbin, Mark Warner and Diane Feinstein. He is
the man behind the now much-ridiculed attempt to
re-brand the Democratic Party: the so-called “Better
Deal” economic agenda, which was rolled out in July
2017. Widely seen as a poll-driven and focus group-
driven set of talking points, “The better deal is
covered not as an ongoing messaging effort but
as one event in July that quickly lost voters’
attention,” said the Washington Post. “It quickly
disappeared.”

We are sure Geoff Garen is very good at what
he does, which is furthering the careers of image-
conscious politicians. The problem is that the
AFM-EPF trustees are not politicians. They
are supposed to be guardians and fiduciaries
of our pension, not supporting their own
self-interests.

When they hire a political consultant, it is not
because they want to understand us better or
to communicate with us better. It is because
they want to limit the reputational damage
that they have suffered from their miserable
stewardship of our pension fund. But the
trustees have a problem: their failures are just
too obvious at this point and no political
strategist will be able to fix that. Other pension
funds in the entertainment industry are
operating at healthy levels and with expenses
well within their means. Our own sister fund
in Canada is doing fine. Our pension plan
stands alone for its remarkably abysmal
performance. No amount of spinning or
messaging is going to be able to change that.

As our pension plan approaches critical and
declining status, trustees should be making
extraordinary efforts to cut down on expenses.
Instead, our trustees are burning through our
hard-earned pension dollars more than ever
before. They are hiring layers upon layers of
expensive investment managers, consultants,
law firms and now pollsters. In a year when
AFM-EPF narrowly staved off being in critical
and declining status, every dollar is precious.
The trustees are spending our hard-earned
pension dollars to rehabilitate their image,
and that is an outrage.

You don’t need a pollster to know that.

*We’ve received multiple emails asking
whether plan participants should take part
in these focus groups. Our response is you
should absolutely. Ask the tough questions,
tell Geoff Garen what actions you would
like the trustees to take and let the data
they collect communicate how you feel
about the current leadership of the AFM-EPF.

================================================

III. AFM’S LATEST ON THE SUBJECT
(Why is our money being spent on this?)

Our Commitment: Timely, Transparent Communications
and Listening to Participants

The American Federation of Musicians and Employers’
Pension Fund (“the Fund”) and its Trustees are
committed to n this/ensuring that all participants
have access to timely and accurate information
about the Fund and its financial status. We want
to hear your questions and concerns, as well as
your communications preferences.

To this end, the Fund recently engaged the firm of
Hart Research Associates to assist us in this effort.
Hart is a well-respected firm that has deep experience
assisting unions, including those in the entertainment
industry, in listening to the needs and concerns of
members. Hart will conduct several telephone focus
groups to help us gain insights into our participants’
knowledge, views and questions about their pension
benefits and the financial status of the Fund.

This is part of our ongoing commitment to transparency.
We will use the insights gained from this process to
identify and answer the most pressing questions on
the minds of our participants—and help keep you
well-informed as we explore actions we can take
to protect your benefits.

We recognize that participants rely on different
sources of information, so we will be utilizing a
number of tools to listen to and inform participants
of important news regarding your pension benefits.
Soon, you will receive an invitation to participate
in a webinar that the Fund will host in January 2018
that will include a question-and-answer session
with the Trustee Co-Chairs, Fund Staff and Plan Advisors.

We believe that, while there are costs involved, it
is a necessary, appropriate and responsible use of
Fund resources to enhance and increase our
communications with participants at this time,
particularly given the ongoing barrage of
misinformation being put forth by individuals with
their own political agenda.

You can find additional information on our website at
www.afm-epf.org.

================================================
IV. COMMENTS

the afm/pension plan folks are SO full of shit !!

the mps (info@musiciansforpensionsecurity.com)
is So right on. thank you, Committee, for
shining the light on this dichotomy !

and come on everyone, please check out
Musicians for Pension Security, and let’s
help them put a stop to the AFM’s plan
to cut our pensions A LOT !!!

———–

Re: Strike Vote by Pasadena Symphony

CONTAGIOUS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

What comes around goes around.

Now they get a taste of what those
who came before them.

Letting it go for almost three years
since 2015 ?

The symphony thought the pops would
bring in more money from a different
subscriber group. I guess maybe it hasn’t.

 

====================================

V. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————

12/17/17

ASMAC/LAJS Holiday party @ Catalina’s in Hollywood

Dec 17 @ 11:30 am – 3:00 pm

Bill Cunliffe Trio with special guest Denise Donatelli

———————————–
12/20/17
GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS
Pianist HAROUT SENEKEREMIAN
performs works by
Haydn, Tchaikovsky, and Stravinsky.

Concert at 12 noon.

http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you!
Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Glendale Noon Concerts
818-249-5108

————————————-

12/21/17

John and Gerald Clayton
Father/Son concert at
BACCHUS KITCHEN

December 21, 2017
6pm
John & Gerald Clayton performing at
Bacchus Kitchen
626.594.6377
1384 E. Washington Blvd, Pasadena 91104
http://www.bacchuskitchen.com

—————————————-

1/17/17

CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth Orchestra

You are cordially invited to attend the admission FREE concert
given by the CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth
Orchestra on Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 3PM at the San
Gabriel Mission Playhouse, 320 S Mission Drive, San Gabriel, CA 91776.

This concert will feature the 2017 ASTA-LA Competition
Grand Prize winner, 15 year old cellist Jessica Lee as soloist
in the 4th movement of the Elgar cello concerto. The
repertoire will also include Suppe Poet & Peasant Overture,
Sibelius Karelia Suite and Schubert Unfinished Symphony.

Young musicians age 12 through college in the orchestra
gain admittance to the orchestra through our annual
competitive audition. This is the first concert of this 2017-2018
concert season of the orchestra.

Please come give these young musicians the support they deserve.

Looking forward to seeing all of you there.

Sincerely,
Fung Ho
Music Director & Conductor
CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth Orchestra

 

——————————————-

 

The Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program at the Seattle Film Institute

is now accepting applications for the one-year

Master of Music in Film Composition

One of the Top 4 Film Music Programs in the World!

Recently rated as the #4 school in the world for film scoring education by Music School Central.

“in just one year, the school places students into a pressure cooker of intense learning resulting in a professional demo reel that can be used to obtain future paid commercial opportunities.”

 

Learn from Industry Professionals

All PNWFS faculty are active professional film and game composers, orchestrators, copyists, and engineers, including the program’s creator and lead instructor Dr. Hummie Mann.  Hummie is the two-time Emmy Award winning film composer of “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” and featured in Variety Magazine’s article “Leaders in Learning”.

Our Program Features:
• 9 live recording sessions with professional musicians at Studio X, Seattle’s premiere, world-class studio.
• Opportunities to work with student directors to score actual films from film programs all over the world.
• 
Training in all major software programs used in the industry.
• 
A state-of-the-art workstation assigned to each student fully installed with the latest versions of all software, sample libraries and plug-ins needed to complete the program.

 

Accelerated and Affordable

We are a one-year Master of Music in Film Composition program which not only gives our graduates the opportunity to enter the industry and start their careers a year sooner than other programs but saves them an entire year of living expenses. In addition to our accelerated format we also offer the most affordable tuition out of competing programs. Our students have access to FAFSA financial assistance, loans, and scholarships as well.

 

History of Success

We are very proud to have a high success rate for our graduates who have gone on to work on television shows such as Castle, Empire, and Once Upon a Time; video games such as World of Warcraft, Spate, and Destiny; and films such as The Revenant, Trolls, The Dark Tower, and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Apply now and you could be joining their ranks!

Applications are being accepted for the Fall 2018 school year.
We offer rolling admissions – no deadline to apply.

 

 

(800) 882-4734 | www.pnwfilmmusic.com
——————————————–

UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

MPS ANSWERS AFM / CLOSED DOORS / WHAT THE AFM SAYS / EVENTS

Monday, December 11th, 2017

 

12/11/17

I. MUSICIANS FOR PENSION SECURITY ANSWER AFM COMPLAINTS
II. TRUSTEES BEHIND CLOSED DOORS
III. WHAT THE AFM/PENSION PLAN SENT OUT
IV. EVENTS

HAPPY THANKSGIVING FROM THE COMMITTEE!

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

 

================================

 

I. MUSICIANS FOR PENSION SECURITY ANSWER AFM COMPLAINTS

When our trustees sent out a letter one year ago in
December of 2016 disclosing for the first time that it
was quite possible that we could be facing cuts to our
existing benefits as soon as spring 2017 there was a
lot of confusion, unanswered questions, and shock.
In the months following, when many AFM members
looked to our elected leaders and trustees for help,
information and a plan. It became clear that our
elected leaders were not going to help and that we
would have to deal with the pension crisis ourselves.
A group of concerned musicians organized to
address the ongoing pension crisis and founded
Musicians for Pension Security. Our mission
statement from the beginning has been clear and
simple: We have come together in search of
more information about the state of our pension
and, ultimately, to demand more transparency and
accountability from the AFM-EPF Trustees. With
input and participation from plan participants across
the country, we will be able to speak with one
unified voice working towards a sustainable
long-term plan for a secure pension.

On 12/9/2017, participants of the AFM-EPF
pension plan received an email (read it here)
from our trustees who say they want to “set
the record straight” and accusing “individuals
who have attacked Fund Trustees” with
information “not supported by data and ignoring
facts that don’t serve their agendas.”

If this is directed at MPS, then we will set the
record straight about our organization. We are
not a few “individuals.” MPS is now a national
organization that reaches into every major
local in this country. It took us only five days
to crowdfund $15,000 to hire a highly respected
actuarial firm, Bolton Partners. We have organized
thousands of plan participants through our website
www.musiciansforpensionsecurity.com and the
MPS Facebook page. Our national conference
calls are regularly attended by scores of engaged
participants across the country. Policymakers in
Washington D.C. like Senator Sherrod Brown and
Senator Lamar Alexander (Chairman of the Senate
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee)
regularly deal with MPS as a serious and impactful
interest group representing the concerns of pension
plan participants. Our grassroots organizing capability
was recently shown when we spearheaded an
extremely successful call to action where thousands of
AFM members called and emailed AFM President Ray
Hair urging him to support The Butch Lewis Act. MPS
Executive Director, Adam Krauthamer, recently received
an award from the Pension Rights Center in Washington
DC in recognition of his services to the AFM-EPF plan
participants. He received this award alongside several
other highly respected pension activists and journalists.

Far from “promoting our own selfish interests,”
as the trustees put it, MPS volunteers are doing
the thousands of hours of work it takes to try and
help our friends and colleagues around the country
stay informed in the face of this pension crisis, while
at the same time seeking solutions. We all do this
while holding down demanding careers as professional
musicians. It is unclear how trying to protect
our fellow members can be deemed selfish.

MPS does not have armies of advisors, consultants,
lawyers and Washington D.C. pollsters controlling our
actions and messaging like the AFM-EPF does.
Through rigorous analysis of the facts, and help from
our legal counsel, actuary and the Pension Rights
Center, we have been able to debunk much of the spin
and misdirection put forth by the trustees. For nine
months we have published numerous pieces with clear
explanations disproving many of the things our trustees
have said and written about regarding our pension fund.
All articles are painstakingly fact-checked and
can be found here.

The trustees’ latest email blast is yet another example
of their spin and misdirection. Let’s take each item in
order:

The Butch Lewis Act

The Butch Lewis Act provides low-cost government
loans to plans like AFM-EPF and would guarantee a
100% pension payout for everyone in the plan. It is
a no-brainer for our trustees to support. (The AFM
supports it, but critically the AFM-EPF trustees do not.)
They state AFM-EPF actuaries are analyzing it but
they have had this legislation in their hands for over a
month. The actuaries have software and could produce
any necessary analysis inside of one day. Our trustees
continue to support the NCCMP and refuse to disassociate
themselves from NCCMP’s active opposition to the Butch
Lewis Act. (See the previous post here). The trustees’
refusal to endorse the Butch Lewis Act does not support
the long-term interest of the fund. It is damaging the
interests of plan participants.

“Streamlined” Investment Management

Our trustees claim that adding another investment manager to
oversee the day-to-day decisions of the investment portfolio will
“streamline” the investment strategy. However, they still keep a
bloated staff of 70 plus people, including Maureen Kilkelly, who
earns by far the most of any executive director of any pension
plan we are aware of in the peer group. They will also keep
investment consultant group Meketa on board despite their
industry worst investment performance for our fund but, we
are told, for a reduced fee. It is unclear why one more dollar
would be spent on them based on their performance. (See
our previous article on fund expenses here.)

Investment Expenses

The trustees do not even attempt to defend their overall
expenses of $25 million per year. Instead, they take one
sub-category, investment management fees, and try to
show they compare favorably. They claim that they pay
their investment managers less than other union pension
funds do. Whether it is true or not, it is like saying if my
electricity bill is less than yours, that means my total
household expenses are less than yours are.

Administrative expenses

The trustees make the same specious argument they made
in the Roadshow in March 2017: they compare absolute
administrative expenses of much larger funds, like the
Screen Actors Guild to ours. That is not the standard measure
of efficiency in the investment business. The industry standard
way to compare is to look at the ratio of expenses to assets
under management. On this basis, AFM-EPF has by far the
highest expenses of any peer pension plan. The trustees try
to make themselves look better by cherry picking their data:
stripping out expenses they don’t like (depreciation, professional
fees, PBGC premiums). Of course, if you can customize your
comparison you’re much more likely to get the results you want.
See our previous article on this topic here.

In closing, we would like to say that we will continue to raise
our voices until the AFM-EPF trustees and fund administrators
accept their responsibility and work to fully protect the pension
benefits of all fund participants. We encourage all AFM members
to do the same.

 

================================================

II. Trustees Tout Expense Cuts
But Behind Closed Doors it’s Another Story

Recently posted in the Frequently Asked Questions section of the
AFM-EPF website is a highly important new disclosure that the
trustees have hired Cambridge Associates as an “Outside Chief
Investment Officer” (OCIO). This is an important development
because it puts in perspective just how out of touch the AFM-EPF
trustees are in December 2017. They are not replacing Meketa,
our fund investment consultant since 2010, but they are adding
another layer of management and expense heaped on top of
what is already the bloated administration of our pension fund.
It is no wonder that the expenses of the AFM-EPF are by far
the highest in our industry. Our trustees spent over $250 million
over the last 10 years, with an investment return that is dead
last in the business. (The 3 and 5-year returns are also at the
bottom of the peer group. See our previous article about
these numbers here.)

Now with the addition of an Outside Chief Investment Officer,
Cambridge Associates, expenses at the AFM-EPF will be
even higher. The layers of expenses at the AFM-EPF are
truly staggering. First, we have Cambridge Associates (OCIO),
then Meketa our fund consultant, both of which are taking
substantial fees for their overall management of the fund.
These two firms then choose over 25 investment managers,
who each take a cut of the assets under management.
Then there are often sub-managers who take a further
cut. For example, in the private equity and alternative investment
sector (in which AFM-EPF is heavily invested), most of the
funds we invest in are a “fund of funds.” These funds are
nothing more than general contractors who sub-contract
out the actual investing to other funds.

On top of all that expense, AFM-EPF office has a staff of
over 70 reporting to Maureen Kilkelly, who is earning
$425,000 per year and her deputy, Will Luebking, who
earns $280,000 per year. Cambridge Associates has
been hired by AFM-EPF as its “Outside Chief Investment
Officer (OCIO)”. If our trustees have outsourced the role
of chief investment officer, then what are all the high-
priced managers on staff at the AFM-EPF doing?

Finally, we must ask why, after turning in the worst
investment performance in our peer group over the
past decade, is Meketa still serving as investment
advisor and why is Meketa collecting a handsome
fee for doing the same work that Cambridge
Associates is doing? MPS has learned that in early
2016, the trustees hired Gallagher Fiduciary Advisors,
LLC, to select a new investment advisor. In October
2016, Gallagher recommended that Meketa not be
considered for this role. The trustees overruled that
recommendation and made the decision to hire
Cambridge and keep Meketa as well.

In December of 2016 when our trustees disclosed
for the first time that we might be facing cuts to existing
benefits as soon as spring of 2017, they sent to plan
participants an offensive letter stating What Participants
Can Do:

“Given our financial status, we are faced with the reality
of the one-dollar benefit multiplier as the basis for any
benefits earned in the future. This means that while
the AFM-EPF pension you receive will still be important,
for many the benefit will be a modest one. A modest
pension emphasizes the importance of having a
comprehensive retirement strategy that includes a
personal savings component to supplement the AFM-EPF
pension and Social Security benefits.”

In December of 2017, as our trustees still seem to be
embracing a plan to cut our existing benefits in the
near future, MPS has a message for “What Trustees
Can Do” on behalf of plan participants: Stop wasting
our money. Stop making poor management decisions
and stop saying publicly you are going to cut down on
expenses at the AFM-EPF while behind closed doors
the opposite is true. Start being accountable to plan
participants for your actions both past and present.

 

================================

 

III. WHAT THE AFM/PENSION PLAN SENT OUT

Recently, participants have received emails from
individuals who have attacked Fund Trustees and
have misrepresented information about the Fund—
either by cherry-picking or presenting things without
any factual context—while making judgments not
supported by data and ignoring facts that don’t serve
their agendas.

We recognize that the financial status of our Fund
and the security of our participants’ pension benefits
is a concern shared by all. We have heard from you
that these third-party communications are causing
both confusion and distress among Fund participants.

Today, we want to set the record straight on some
important issues. We also call upon those who do
not support the long-term interests of the Fund, and
who are promoting their own selfish interests, to
cease making false and misleading attacks, and to
redirect themselves toward responsible, productive
efforts to protect the pension benefits of their fellow
Fund participants.

We are committed to ensuring that all participants
have access to timely and accurate information
about the Fund and its financial status. You can find
additional information on our website at www.afm-epf.org.

AFM-EPF Actuaries Analyzing Federal Legislation
to Assist Troubled Multiemployer Pension Funds

On November 16, we informed you of the Butch Lewis
Act, which was introduced by U.S. Senator Sherrod
Brown to address the severe challenges being faced
by multiemployer pension funds across the nation.
Congressional Democrats have stated their intent to
include this legislation in the omnibus spending bill that
must be passed by a now-extended deadline of
December 22.

When this legislation was first introduced, the AFM-
EPF Trustees, immediately and not due to any
prompting, directed our actuaries to determine if
the bill would, if enacted, provide the Fund with
the financial support required to avoid insolvency.
This analysis is currently underway.

If it is determined that the Butch Lewis Act helps
protect our participants’ pension benefits, then the
Trustees would support it, as we would any legislative
proposal that provides relief to the AFM-EPF.

OCIO Approach Streamlines Investment Strategy,
Expected to Generate Increased Returns

The Fund’s Trustees recognize the need for both
expert advice and the ability to respond quickly to
often rapidly-changing conditions in the financial
markets. As detailed in our recently updated FAQs,
we recently made the decision to streamline our
investment structure and process by shifting to an
OCIO (Outsourced Chief Investment Officer) model.
The respected firm of Cambridge Associates, LLC
has been engaged to oversee day-to-day decisions
for the Fund’s investment portfolio, acting within
parameters established by the Fund’s Investment
Committee and Board of Trustees.

Meketa Investment Group will no longer serve in
the role of Investment Advisor and will instead,
under a reduced fee structure, adopt the role of
Independent Monitoring Fiduciary for the OCIO.

We expect that, over the long term, this approach
will allow us to be more responsive to new and
changing market dynamics, and will lead to higher
investment returns after fees.

AFM-EPF Investment Expenses are Lower
Than Those of Other Union Pension Funds

The Trustees closely monitor investment fees and
make every reasonable effort to keep them to a
minimum. According to Greenwich Associates’
most recent survey of union pension funds (2016),
AFM-EPF’s active investment manager fees are
lower than the average in every asset class. Trustees
have also reduced investment fees by moving
assets into passive index funds where it makes
sense to do so.

AFM-EPF Administrative Expenses Closely
Monitored, Comparable with Other Entertainment
Industry Funds

Despite the false claims made by others, the data
proves that AFM-EPF’s administrative expenses
are actually in line with other large pension plans
in the entertainment industry. The chart below shows
that we fall right in the middle of our peers. Since
each plan has its own fiscal year end, for this analysis
we used the fiscal year (shown in parentheses in the
table) that contained as much of calendar year
2015 as possible.

It’s important to remember that our Plan was the only
stand-alone pension plan in this group. All other
entities administered a health fund, and, in most
cases, other ancillary funds among which general
administrative expenses, including staff salaries,
are shared. When comparing administrative expenses,
we adjusted the Form 5500 numbers to account for
that. We also removed PBGC premiums, depreciation
and professional fees to make this more of an “apples
to apples” comparison. Any comparison that doesn’t
account for these critical factors is totally inaccurate
and misleading.

Being in the middle of our peers is an accomplishment
because we run a far more complicated Plan than many
of our peers – we have thousands more collective
bargaining agreements and interact with thousands
more employers than most. When you compare our
Plan’s administrative expenses to six other similar
entertainment industry plans, we have the lowest
expenses per number of collective bargaining agreements,
the second lowest per number of employers and the
third lowest per number of participants.

====================================

IV. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

 

————————————

12/17/17

ASMAC/LAJS Holiday party @ Catalina’s in Hollywood

Dec 17 @ 11:30 am – 3:00 pm

Bill Cunliffe Trio with special guest Denise Donatelli
——————————————–

UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

LANDMARK? / MPS HONOERED / AFM TIES TO NCCMP / EVENTS

Friday, December 1st, 2017

 

12/1/17

I. OLD UNION BUILDING A LANDMARK?
II. MUSICIANS FOR PENSION SECURITY HONORED
III. AFM-EPF Trustees Ties to NCCMP — that’s a problem.
IV. EVENTS

HAPPY THANKSGIVING FROM THE COMMITTEE!

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

 

================================

 

 

I. Hollywood’s 1950s musicians union building
could become a city landmark

The “foremost entertainers and studio musicians”
of the 1950s were members of the union
by Bianca Barragan Nov 20, 2017, 1:33pm PST

A two-story commercial building built in the ’50s
for a musicians union may be added to the city’s
roster of historic-cultural landmarks. The Cultural
Heritage Commission voted Thursday to consider
the Musician’s Union Hall on Vine Street near
Waring Avenue as a potential monument.

The historians at Esotouric noted that while this
is the first step on the road to landmark status,
it’s something to be excited about. The property
owners, Lincoln Property Company, are not
contesting the designation, and a representative
from the office of Los Angeles City Council
member Mitch O’Farrell spoke in favor of the
landmarking.

Completed in 1950, the Musicians Union of
Hollywood was one of the final commissions
of architect Gordon B. Kaufmann before his
death in 1949. Kaufmann was the architect
behind the Greystone Mansion in Beverly
Hills, a 1930s-era section of the Los Angeles
Times’s Times Mirror Square complex in
Downtown, and Hollywood hotspots the
Earl Carroll Theater and the Palladium.

With its boxy form; concrete, steel, and
glass construction; and its bands of metal
framed windows, the union hall is considered
an excellent example of Corporate International
architectural style, says the planning
department’s report on the structure.

Until July of this year, the structure “served
as a clubhouse and organization headquarters
for the Musicians Union Local 47, now known
as the American Federation of Musicians
Local 47,” the report says.

Both the building and its interiors have been
altered over the years, but many vintage
features remain, including a 1950s-era sign
next to the building’s marquee that features
an eighth note festooned with a “47” ribbon
and the words “Professional Musicians”,
“Local 47”, and “American Federation of
Musicians, AFL-CIO.”

The “foremost entertainers and studio musicians
of the era” were members of the Local 47,
including the famed Wrecking Crew, a group
of studio musicians who were the go-to
players for such big names as The Beach
Boys, Phil Spector, Frank Sinatra, Elvis,
The Byrds, and Simon and Garfunkel.

Read the article here:
https://preview.tinyurl.com/yc5q8ajn

[Colleagues, There was one commenter named
DISGUSTED who obviously was an interested
party, even knowing the numbers of the union
members who voted to sell. {Sensing recording
musician or local leadership.} Totally trashed the
whole idea of it’s consideration as a historical
monument.]

 

================================

 

II. Musicians for Pension Security Honored in Washington DC

The Pension Rights Center honored seven activists
and financial columnist Michelle Singletary at an
event held on November 7th, 2017 at the Carnegie
Institution in Washington, D.C. One of the activists
honored was Adam Krauthamer who is currently
the Executive Director of Musicians for Pension Security.

The Center honored retiree and worker activists
for their work to stop pension cuts and to work
toward a solution to solve underfunding in
multiemployer plans and protect retirees’
benefits. In speaking about the activists,
Karen Friedman, the Center’s Executive
Vice President, called them, “supermen
and superwomen and some of the most
inspirational people I’ve ever met. They truly
represent democracy-in-action.” Friedman
went on to say that, “Many of these individuals,
shy at first, have become fearless warriors,
first-rate financial analysts and lobbyists. They
have created an unstoppable movement and
have inspired legislation.  I am convinced their
efforts will help stop pension cuts and save
multiemployer plans.” Read more about the event here.

================================

III. AFM-EPF Trustees Have Deep Ties to NCCMP
—and that’s a problem.

National Coordinating Committee for Multiemployer Plans
(NCCMP) is a trade association of multi-employer plans
in Washington DC. In 2014, they were instrumental in
formulating and passing MPRA, which is the law that
would allow cuts to our hard-earned pension benefits.

Our pension fund, the AFM-EPF, has deep connections
to the NCCMP going back many years. The AFM-EPF
is a dues-paying member of NCCMP and our AFM
trustees attend their conferences every year. Two of
our trustees, Christopher Brockmeyer and Bill Moriarity,
serve on NCCMP’s Board of Directors and Steering
Committee. Both have given lectures at those
conferences. Brockmeyer, the AFM-EPF’s trustee
co-chair, served on the NCCMP working group
which formulated the MPRA proposal.

MPRA has been a public policy disaster as many in
Congress on both sides of the aisle have openly
acknowledged. (Read the articles linked below.)
Even with bipartisan support to replace MPRA with
a much better alternative, the NCCMP is currently
fighting to preserve it and subvert current efforts to
replace it.

The alternative they are trying to block was recently
introduced by Senator Sherrod Brown and is called
the Butch Lewis Act, which would provide low-cost
government loans to troubled pension plans. The
proposed law would guarantee that all plan participants
receive 100% of their promised pension benefit.
This is a very worthy piece of legislation that
deserves our support and that of our trustees.

Unfortunately, NCCMP is circulating their own
proposal under which federal loans would not
be available to plans like the AFM-EPF plan.
Instead, the AFM-EPF plan would be forced to
stay under the current MPRA law and undergo
cuts to accrued benefits.

It would be a gross dereliction of duty for our
trustees to not actively support a legislative
proposal that preserves 100% of our hard-earned
pension benefits. That is what the Butch Lewis
Act does. We demand that the trustees reject
NCCMP’s attempt to undermine the Butch
Lewis Act.

ARTICLES ABOUT MPRA

Restoring pension accountability by giving
workers and retirees a seat at the table:
Rob Portman (Opinion)

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y9rkmaon

———————–

Portman Introduces Bill to Protect Pensions for 48,000 Ohioans

https://preview.tinyurl.com/y7jmdaxw

———————–

That awful congressional plan to allow pension cuts heads for enactment

https://preview.tinyurl.com/ybv2zt75

———————–

MORE ABOUT NCCMP:

Home Page

NCCMP Team

 

===========================

 

IV. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

12/6/17

PRESS RELEASE/ Wed DECEMBER 6, 2017 at
12:10-12:40 pm at the Free Admission

GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS/ Cellist DEREK
STEIN performs solo works by Hindemith, Prokofiev,
Nicholas Deyoe, P.D.Q. Bach, and Penderecki.

The DEC 6 Press Release & a color photo jpeg
cellist DEREK STEIN are attached.
http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you!
Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Glendale Noon Concerts
818 -249-5108

————————————

 

12/6/17

First WEDNESDAYS: Joe Kraemer
Dec 6 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Joe Kraemer will be discussing his compositional
process, from spotting, through thematic development,
composition, mocking-up, recording, and finally
mixing.  He will be including clips of his work
from JACK REACHER and MISSION
IMPOSSIBLE, including behind-the-scenes
footage and alternate cues, as well as examples
of sketches and conductor’s scores.

————————————

12/17/17

ASMAC/LAJS Holiday party @ Catalina’s in Hollywood

Dec 17 @ 11:30 am – 3:00 pm

Bill Cunliffe Trio with special guest Denise Donatelli
——————————————–

UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47