Archive for the ‘Committee Newsletters’ Category

ONE MUSICIAN’S STORY / EVENTS

Saturday, June 17th, 2017

6/17/17
I.  ONE MUSICIAN’S STORY
II. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===========================================

I.  ONE MUSICIAN’S STORY

Robert Matsuda is a violinist who has contributed to film
and television scores since 1996, including the feature
film The Horse Whisperer (1998) and the blockbuster
television series Lost (2004–10)

A member of the Union of Professional Musicians, Local 47, in
Los Angeles, Robert recalls the heyday of motion picture
musicians and describes the ways in which producers have moved
much of the work overseas or resorted to licensed pop songs or
computer-generated music.

QUESTION:How did you get your start with orchestral soundtracks?
Your first film was The Horse Whisperer, correct?

I did a film before that in which my friend put together the musicians
for a Pauly Shore movie called Bio-Dome (1996)
.
Interestingly enough, the residuals for Bio-Dome went on, and on,
and on. At the back end, it actually paid better than The Horse
Whisperer. I’m probably still getting checks for Bio-Dome. It was
officially my first movie project.

QUESTION: How did you get your foot in the door?

When I was a teenager studying the violin, I had a teacher, who
was part of the Fox orchestra back in its heyday. You can see
him in the Marilyn Monroe movie How to Marry a Millionaire
(1953)
.
He would tell me about playing for the movies while I was at
my lessons. It sounded like a really great thing! You’d be playing
your instrument, and it would allow you to make what I assumed
would be a comfortable middle-class living. I knew that was what
I wanted to do when I grew up.

Bio-Dome came out in 1996, and I got that job after about ten
years of going around playing for concertmasters and contractors
and trying to get my foot in the door. When people ask, “How
do you get started?” I have to disabuse them of the notion that
there’s a clear-cut way of getting into this kind of work, at least
what’s left of it. And it’s different for everybody, because it’s
not like applying for a job at an insurance company.

I got the Bio-Dome job because I was a friend of the contractor
who got the job because he was a friend of the composer. They
both attended the same high school when they were younger.

QUESTION: That got you started. What kept your career going?

I had a good stretch of work after Bio-Dome, until 2006. I got
my position on The Horse Whisperer through a connection
with the composer’s family. I had been working with volunteers
for about ten years at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
(LACMA), and the word got around that I was a violinist.

One of the volunteers was related to the composer for
The Horse Whisperer and she put in a good word for me.
I owe that job to her. Then, once I was playing for him, I started
getting hired to play on his other films and things expanded
from there. It’s critical for instrumentalists to end up on a
contractor’s list. They are responsible for hiring people to
play in the orchestra.

QUESTION: How do you get on a contractor’s list?

It’s a nebulous process. There are so many ways! You play
for people, like the lead violinist, who is called the concertmaster.

Of course, those people have an inflated sense of their own power.
People have to play for them; they’re the gatekeepers who make
recommendations to the contractor. My entrée was through a family
-work connection. The composer then told the contractor to contact
me. And of course people know each other from school, “Oh, I went
to Juilliard with so and so.” They recommend you to the contractor.
People even say there’s a casting couch.

When composers are young and they’re trying to make it, they need
a reel. They need projects to work on, and they often seek out student
filmmakers at film schools. The composers don’t make much money,
which means they can’t pay the musicians much, if anything at all.

Oftentimes they will ask musicians to volunteer: “I don’t have a lot
of money, but I’ll buy you pizza. Can you help me score the short
film I’m working on?” Musicians will agree to do the work in the
hope that the composer’s profile in the industry will rise and that
they’ll take you along for the ride. But that doesn’t always work.
In fact, a major beef with my colleagues is that they’ll play for
free! Worst of all, when people you play for become more successful,
they tend to forget that you once did them a favor. Of course, I
imagine that if there’s a lot of money on the line and if the young
composer has a choice between working and not working, they’ll
say to the contractor: “Okay, fine, just take care of it. I’m sorry I
have to leave Robert and his friends behind, but, this is my chance.”

So, it’s a complex process. By the way, the same can be said about
contractors. They might use you once—if it is helpful to them—and
never hire you again. So the contractor is a central gatekeeper.

They’re like Saint Peter, they are so powerful. In fact, there are one
or two who are enormously powerful and influential. For a long time
during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, there was one woman named
Sandy DeCrescent who controlled access to 90 percent of the work.

She retired, and one of her assistants, Peter Rotter, took over. Then
he controlled 90 percent of the work. At some point after the transition,
Sandy and Peter got into an argument over some business or personal
matter. Now she’s back in the game, and they’re mortal enemies! I’ve
never seen them. To me, they’re like the Wizards of Oz. I’m not in the
90 percent world. I’m in the 10 percent world. And for a good stretch
of time, 10 percent was pretty good. But now, that amount of work
is so much smaller that it breaks down to almost nothing.

QUESTION: Do contractors tend to hire the same people? Do orchestras
stick together from film to film?

Contractors put together an orchestra for each film. And there are
contractors who attach themselves to certain composers. So this
creates a degree of expectation: if you played on one composer’s
film, you will likely play for all of their films.

Composers like to work with people they know and trust; so do contractors.
But there are no guarantees.

QUESTION: When contractors reach out to people, are they asking for
an audition?

No, they know you already. They know they want you. It’s more of a
conversation about money, time, and availability.

QUESTION: When you were working consistently, how often were
you working?

Before I did The Horse Whisperer, I was working at LACMA, so I
didn’t live on my music work. I would do community orchestras,
weddings, and any kind of live music work that I could get.
Even after The Horse Whisperer I still wasn’t getting
enough work to quit the museum, but by that time I had accumulated
so many sick days, vacation days, and free days that LACMA wanted
me to take days off. That was great because I would get a paid day
off and be able to do a movie.

I met my mentor, Harris Goldman, on The Horse Whisperer.

I was very fortunate to meet him; he had great relationships with
many different composers and orchestrators. Orchestrators are
important because they often write the music for a film based on
the composer’s ideas. Orchestrators possess the technical know-
how to translate those ideas into sheet music. Connections to
composers and orchestrators are helpful—obviously they’re both
powerful, and they can make recommendations to the contractors.

Harris introduced me to Graeme Revell, who has since retired. He
also introduced me to a young composer named Michael Giacchino,
who is huge now. I think I did his first non-video-game project,
which was the TV series Alias (2001–6)
.
Alias led to Lost.

For a while, Lost and Alias were on at the same time, and then he
started doing movies—Pixar movies like
The Incredibles (2004), Ratatouille (2007), and others.

So, right there, I had access to Thomas Newman on some good
films. I was doing Pixar movies and any other movie that Michael
Giacchino was doing, and dur ing a brief period, I was doing both
Alias and Lost.

One week I’d go in and do Alias and the next week I’d do Lost.
And then Alias went off the air, but I still had Lost.

QUESTION: Can you describe a typical day?

For episodic television, it’s a short day. An episode of TV for an
hour-long show like Alias or Lost, which is called a single,
usually requires three hours: typically from ten in the morning
to one in the afternoon, with a ten-minute break at the top of each
hour. For a motion picture, there’s more footage that needs to be
scored, so depending on the nature of the film, it could be one day,
known as a double session. That could mean about six hours with
a lunch break, or it could mean a whole week.

QUESTION: Do studio musicians need a second income?

I would say the most successful people have a regular flow of
studio work across film and television. But they also teach and
play in other orchestras, like the opera or the Los Angeles
Chamber Orchestra. However, they always have studio work
at the core of their career.

QUESTION: How much can you make in a recording session?

If it is a standard budget, a rank-and-file musician can make
about $80 an hour. That’s not bad, and you get money on the
back end as well. There is also low-budget, and now something
called low-low-budget, which pays considerably less.

QUESTION: What is the back end?

Some office in Encino tallies it up, and it’s predicated on things
like video sales, DVD sales, and what happens overseas. They
tally all of the projects that you have worked on and your
percentage of royalties, and then you get a check in the
summertime. You get one check for film and television, and a
smaller check the next month for any kind of phonograph work
you’ve done. (They still say “phonograph” even though it’s an
incredibly outdated term.) It refers to work you’ve done on
commercial music, like albums or singles.

With your check, you get a long itemized statement, and it
behooves you to look at it closely to see if they missed anything.
It happens. But it’s also really interesting to see the different
trends across the film and television you’ve done. Like
I said, I’m still getting money from old projects like Bio-Dome.
It’s maybe $10, but it’s money! Other films have a huge drop off.
For instance, Star Trek (2009) made some good money at first,
and then the next year it went down a little, and then
down, down, down, down very quickly. It was a rapid drop.

Both Lost and Alias made a lot of money in international and
ancillary markets.

QUESTION: Over the course of time, how much money could
you expect in residuals?

It was pretty good money. It wasn’t astronomical like it is with
some movies, but it was always a nice check. I don’t recall
exact amounts, but the back end on those shows could pay your
rent for the month. It’s always surprising what pays well on the
back end. Some projects that you think wouldn’t do well end
up paying you the most.

For example, I have a friend who did a sidelining job on the movie
I Love You, Man (2009). He was playing in a quartet at the
wedding at the end. Sidelining means you appear on camera,
almost as an actor. Usually you’re miming to prerecorded music;
you’re just there as a visual. And nobody wanted to take the job!
You had to go up to Malibu every day and be there really early,
and it just didn’t seem like a terribly good job, but because there
was no other scored music— every other song on the soundtrack
was a pop song—they got this large sum of money! Divided among
the four of them, they got really, really good money on the back end.

Another friend, a bass player, had an appearance on a Chili’s commercial.
He was playing the bass with a jazz singer. When he first heard about
the job, he wasn’t going to audition for it, but we convinced him. I think
when everything wrapped up he probably made $10,000 for that, which
is excellent for essentially one day’s work.

QUESTION: When you look at the itemized list of residuals, what have
been some of your biggest surprises, other than Bio-Dome?

A movie that paid very well was The Incredibles. We knew that it was
going to make some good money because it was very successful. But
it was worth thousands of dollars for me! Everybody was asking about it:
“Did you get your check for that?” Because, you know, not everybody
is in that top echelon of musicians, where they’re working for everyone
all the time.

A lot of the musicians in Los Angeles are just like me, waiting for that
elusive studio call, which has become more and more rare.

QUESTION: What happened? You said you started to notice a change
around 2006 or 2007.

What happened was just an acceleration of trends that were already in
place. Costs all come out of the producers’ pockets. I only make scale,
but other people in the orchestra, say a section leader, get double scale.
And if a contractor hires someone we call a doubler—someone who is
hired to play more than one instrument—scale pay is automatically higher.
Plus, the contractor could be making double or triple scale. So it all starts
to add up before you even calculate the back end, which also increases
depending on your scale pay. I think producers began to say, “This is
an unnecessary expense. Let’s go overseas. Let’s go to London.”

They have nationalized health care so there are no benefit costs for
producers. They don’t pay any residuals. There is no union. The musicians
just get paid their hourly rate for their time in the studio.

George Lucas has all of his films done in London. He has always been
virulently antiunion. On the other hand, Thomas Newman has always
been committed to scoring his films in L.A. He comes from a film
music dynasty, so I think he has a strong sense of loyalty to keeping
business in the city. He is loyal to musicians here. His father was
Alfred Newman, his uncle was Lionel Newman, his cousin is Randy
Newman, and his brother is David Newman.

Nevertheless, he got the 007 franchise, and that does not leave England,
so now he has to go over there and use their musicians.

Of course London has a lot of incredibly talented musicians. But if you’re
already in the London Symphony Orchestra, you have that work, so film
jobs are just extra cash. Even if you’re not in the London Symphony
Orchestra, or the four or five other orchestras there, there are lots of
opportunities.

From what I understand, Abbey Road and Air Studios are open night
and day, seven days a week. It’s incredibly busy. Freelance musicians
are scoring films or video game soundtracks. Video games are a huge
market now! Some of them have better production values than motion
pictures. I did some of that ten years ago. I started working on Call of
Duty and Medal of Honor. We basically created motion picture
soundtracks, using a big orchestra. But the video game companies have
become even more tightfisted about residuals and in negotiating with
the unions. They’re basically saying, “We don’t need to do this anymore.”

Whatever pugnacious tactics the unions had unfortunately weren’t
enough to prevent studios from going either overseas or out of state
to find musicians who would accept their terms. I think Seattle was
the first city to break away from the national union.

QUESTION: How pugnacious was the union when this trend started?

I think it was mainly verbal. I don’t think there was a lot of punch
behind it, compared to the other [motion picture] unions. The
musicians’ union doesn’t have as much power. When writers
go on strike, you have no content, so things grind to a halt.
But when musicians go on strike, they say, “Well, we’ll just go
out of town.”

QUESTION: Why is it so easy to go out of town? Don’t directors
and producers want to be closer to the action when they’re in
postproduction, to oversee the development of the soundtrack?

You would think, but then you have to consider the money, and
that’s all the producers and studios are worried about right now.
A studio is just a distribution channel owned by a much larger
global entity. And because they’re multinational corporations,
they have to answer to the bottom line.

The executives who run these multinational corporations likely
have no interest in film music or where it is done. They just
have to answer to shareholders. Accountants have much more
power than they used to. Can you save money by going to
London, or the Czech  Republic, or Macedonia, or Seattle?
If so, we’ll do it!

QUESTION: Where do they go? We know about London and
Seattle.

The Czech Republic is very big.

QUESTION: Why the Czech Republic?

It’s an incredibly musical place. Mozart in his time was
more popular in Prague than in his native Austria. The
country has a rich tradition of symphonic music that includes
Antonin Dvořák and other Czech composers. And the cost
of living is lower there, so wages are lower, and producers
don’t have to pay into health care.

They don’t have to pay the back end. You just have to pay
the musicians for their time in the studio.

QUESTION: What other places?

Well, that’s enough to sink the ship. But London is the biggest,
by far. Dreamworks Animation is 100 percent London. Until
the latest Star Wars, George Lucas did his recording in London.

The new one was done here in L.A., but I don’t know why.

QUESTION: Besides the battle over payments, what else is
making jobs disappear? I think our tastes in music have changed.
When you turn on the radio now and listen to Selena Gomez or
Katy Perry, oftentimes you’re not even hearing real instruments.
Those songs are purely electronic productions done by producers.
People don’t expect strings or real instruments backing up the artist.

Recorded music also has good sampling. A very good producer or
somebody with a suitable keyboard can get what passes for a good
string sound, and the samples are getting better and better. People
don’t expect to hear a natural, acoustic-sounding backdrop when
they hear popular music these days. Those jobs used to be important
sources of money when you weren’t doing film or television work.
Now you only expect to see violins or symphonic instruments,
as a visual. If Michael Bublé is doing something on PBS, you may
see actual instruments and musicians like me. Or if they’re doing
a studio session, I might get a call. But when it comes time to do
it live, they don’t want to see me. Directors will probably try
to get a pretty, willowy, young, white, blond woman to put on the
set. Somebody’s getting the work, at least, but it’s not me.

We had no idea this transition has been afoot. It’s startling,
especially when you consider the significant role that music
plays in most Hollywood films.

Oh, there’s no reason to apologize. Musicians are invisible,
so things can happen to the musicians and the general public
doesn’t know. That’s why I’m so eager and willing to go on
record, or talk to people about changes in our business.

I don’t want to be in politics or anything, but I do want to tell
people that musicians do exist, and I want to emphasize that
when you hear music in a motion picture, it’s played by real
people. Sometimes the music is done so incredibly well,
like with Thomas Newman, that it becomes part of the
narrative. The music is essential for propelling the narrative
of the film.

I think the whole transition has been manipulated in very
clever ways, even through union negotiations. Like I said,
unions don’t have a ton of power, so when they capitulate,
they often turn around to frame it as a benefit. They’ll say,
“We have this new agreement with the studios where a
certain amount of work has to be done in town.” On the
surface that sounds great! But the studios still determine
what work stays and what work goes. So they’ll do a bunch
of films Attack of the Killer Tomatoes: Part VIII in L.A., and
take prestige projects elsewhere. There’s a very tangible
difference for musicians between working on a low-budget
feature versus a big-budget prestige project.

QUESTION: In another interview, you were quoted as saying
that access to job opportunities is now extremely political.
Can you elaborate?

We had various watering holes in our business. I had my
watering hole with a few other animals. Other animals
were at different watering holes. I was at the Thomas Newman
–Michael Giacchino watering hole. It turned out to be a good
watering hole to have, but now these other watering holes,
which provided a lot of work, have dried up and those animals
are coming over to my watering hole, and the more politically
and powerfully connected musicians have the ability to push me
aside, if they want.

QUESTION: What kind of scoring work is still done in L.A.?

Luckily for me, two of the composers who still score here are
Thomas Newman and Michael Giacchino, and there is some
pop music that needs strings. If you Google my name you’ll
see some of the sound—not soundtrack but phonograph—work
I’ve done. I’ll do work for artists like Beck. Beck’s father,
David Campbell, is an orchestrator. So, right there, Beck has
an in-house person to do string arranging for his records. But
that type of work is increasingly rare. Today it’s mostly when a
producer wants some strings to make something more romantic.
They call it sweetening. If a popular artist like Katy Perry does a
ballad, that’s good for us because we might get the call for that,
but again, that doesn’t happen all that often. It’s just not the
predominant sound in popular music. They needed strings more
often during the disco era. My god, you listen to a disco album
that was recorded in the mid- to late 1970s and everything has
strings.

A lot of the work that made for a middle-class living was not
particularly prestigious. It was just work, and there was a lot of it.
For instance making commercial jingles for Safeway, and things
like that. Back then they used real musicians for jingles. The only
time you’ll hear an orchestra on television now is when you watch
The Simpsons (1989–ongoing), Family Guy (1999–ongoing), and
maybe one or two other animated things. Animation seems to require
real musicians.

Desperate Housewives (2004–12) used an orchestra when it was on
the air, but since the demise of Aliasand Lost, I don’t think there’s
been a lot of orchestra work for non-animated TV.

It’s just not looking good for musicians. People are taking early
retirement and taking their pensions. All it requires is that the
musician not accept any work for a year, and then he or she can
start getting pension payments. If work does come in
after that, you can take it, but that means we are essentially
bankrupting our pension fund. My royalty check is being taxed
at 1 percent, which then contributes to the retirement fund, which
is currently in the red. Hopefully the union can rebuild the coffers,
but right now we don’t know if there will be any money left when
my peers and I are ready to retire. I just assume I’m going to
somehow continue working when I’m ninety years old.

Let’s hope I’m able to!

QUESTION: What are you doing today?

I’m lucky that a couple of my friends made a financial intervention.
They took me out to lunch and reminded me that I inherited my
parents’ house after they both died in 2011. Since then, I had
been living in their house and slowly going broke.

They said, “You live in a great house. You have a swimming pool,
a view of the city, and you’re in Los Feliz. Fix up the house and rent
it.” Even though I was still grief stricken, I said, “Okay, I’ll do it.”
I got a loan, fixed up the house, and got a realtor. There were a couple
of offers that fell through and then somebody I had heard about and
liked from the entertainment industry came and loved the house. He
was a novelist for many years prior to becoming a showrunner.
One of his stories got made into a TV show and that totally changed
his life. Now he was working on another show, so he decided to
move to L.A., and he rented my house. I’m not out of the woods,
but at least I’m able to pay for an apartment down the hill from
my house and start paying off my debts. I hope he stays there
forever; he’s a great guy.

So the pressure has eased somewhat. Now I view myself more
as a landlord than a musician sometimes. Some musicians say
you have to do things like that, and a couple of players I know
became real estate agents, but that profession is also subject to
the market’s whims. Some older players have also invested in
property, so I have this little thing with the house and hopefully
there’ll be a point where I’m no longer paying off the debt. I’m
getting money from whatever is left from my movie, television,
and phonograph work. I’m sorry I can’t paint a brighter picture.

====================================

II. EVENTS

 

DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

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6/21/17

Info about upcoming programs through AUGUST 2017
at the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts series
(concerts every first & third Wednesday at 12:10-12:40 pm)
are listed at http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you for your support in publicizing the Glendale Noon Concerts!

Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, GNC
818 249 -5108

On Wednesday  June 21, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
violinist Jacqueline Suzuki  and pianist Frank Basile performing
works by Ravel, Mozart and Debussy at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

JUNE 21, 2017 Program:
Violinist JACQUELINE SUZUKI
Pianist FRANK BASILE

MAURICE RAVEL Violin Sonata No.1 in a minor, “Posthumous” 
W.A. MOZART Sonata for piano and violin in e minor, K.304
CLAUDE DEBUSSY La plus que lente for violin and piano

JACQUELINE SUZUKI, violin, is a longtime member of the Long Beach and Santa Barbara Symphonies. A native of San Francisco, she began her earliest chamber music studies on scholarship at the San Francisco Conservatory. She has performance degrees from the Mannes College of Music (BM), where she studied with William Kroll, and the California Institute of the Arts (MFA).
As a Los Angeles freelancer, she has performed with many ensembles and in many genres, from rock, jazz, Latin and Arabic, to playing in the pit for the Bolshoi Ballet and onstage with the Three Tenors. She has recorded with diverse artists: Snoop Dogg, Neil Sedaka, Leonard Cohen, Whitney Houston, Bocelli, Lalo Schifrin, McCoy Tyner, Placido Domingo and many others, and appears on recordings by the Long Beach, Santa Barbara and Pacific Symphonies. She has spent summers at the Peter Britt, Oregon Coast, Carmel Bach and Cabrillo Festivals and has performed in a string quartet “in residence” on a raft trip down the Green River in Utah. Tours have taken her many times to Japan, Taiwan, Mexico, Canada, Europe, the Middle East and throughout the US. She initiated and curates the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts http://glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com and also the Edendale Up Close Concerts: http://edendaleupclose.blogspot.com

Frank Basile is a harpsichordist, pianist, organist, conductor, musical director, accompanist, singer, church musician, composer, arranger, orchestrator, and teacher. His career has brought him to Los Angeles recording studios, the choir lofts of churches throughout the United States and Europe, any number of theaters in Los Angeles, and the stages of Walt Disney Concert Hall and Carnegie Hall. Versatility has been the hallmark of his work, which has included teaching at USC, Loyola Marymount University, Santa Monica College, and Campbell Hall High School. He is a staff accompanist at Santa Monica College and Loyola Marymount University, an adjunct lecturer in Music at LMU, and director of music at St. Bede’s Episcopal Church in Los Angeles. He studied at Yale University, Northwestern University, and the University of Southern California.

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6/24/17

Song of the Angels Flute Orchestra
Saturday, June 24th at 4 p.m. at
La Crescenta Presbyterian church.
http://www.lcpc.net/
with guest arranger conductor Shaul Ben-Meir
and guest soloists
David Shostac and
Gary Woodward

Concert is free!
Donations are encouraged.

Shaul will be conducting his arrangements of:
Faure Pavane
DeFalla Suite,
Mendelssohn Ruy Blas Overature,
Night on Bald Mountain
and
Radetsky March.

David Shostac and Gary Woodward will be
bringing their musical flute colors to perform
Saint Saens –  Benedictus
and
Bach Violin Double (1st movement).

We will also be opening the concert with
John Williams Fantasy Medley and
Basin Street blues arranged and conducted
by our own esteemed
Charles Fernandez….

Whew – This concert will be awesome!!!

——————————-

6/25/17

Dear Doctor Wu Fans,

We will be appearing at the Santa Monica Summer SOULstice Festival
on Sunday, June 25th 2017 from 4:30 to 6:30 PM, where we will play
two sets of your favorite Steely Dan tunes.  Please bring your friends
along and enjoy a great time with us!

Edgemar Courtyard
2440 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405
4:30 – 6:30 PM

We hope to see you there!

The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

ANOTHER NON-MEETING / SUBMISSION / COMMENT / BASS CAMP / EVENTS

Saturday, April 29th, 2017

4/29/17
I. ANOTHER NON-MEETING LAST MONDAY

II. MEMBER SUBMISSION
III. MEMBER COMMENT
IV. NORTH TEXAS DOUBLE BASS CAMP
V. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

============================================

I. ANOTHER NON-MEETING LAST MONDAY

It’s very telling that there were hundreds there Monday night for the
Lifetime Achievement Awards, but by the time they set up for
the meeting they couldn’t even make quorum. Only 43 stayed.

See the minutes below….

Many introductions – politicians – All Recording musician oriented.
When President Acosta explained what the awards were he mentioned recording musicians first, then orchestral and

copying folks..

Lots of shout outs to RMA friendly folks.

The five honored were:
Gene Cipriano – presented by Dan Higgins
Vincent DeRosa – presented by Annie Bosler
Louise DeTullio – presented by Gayle Levant
Carol Kaye – presented by Chuck Berghofer
and

Dick Nash presented by Alan Kaplan

Each presenter was presented by Rick Baptist.
And each recipient was given a trophy and
certificate from the city.

As you can tell, all the honorees were primarily
recording musicians. Were there no long term
LA Phil musicians they could have honored? The
local of course, knows where they think their
bread is buttered. All are certainly far more than
deserving, but how about someone who is not
an RMA Member.

—————

Didn’t get to actual meeting till 8:15

While the room was packed for the awards (hundreds),
how telling that no quorum was reached for
the meeting. Only 43 stayed.

Called the roll…

Seems a majority of those in attendance were
“Interested parties” In other words, those who
make money working for the union on the board
or in committees.

50 Year Pins given out:
John Scalo(SP?)
Rusty Higgins

Officer reports given –
President – Showed presentation.
Update on building transition – McCormick is
contractor. McCormick construction management.

PHASE I
Offices
Rehearsal rooms

PHASE II
Multipurpose room and main exterior

NEGOTIATIONS
LA Phil
LA Opera  Ratified
New West
Metro Community Orch Ratified
Greek
Tanikawa CBA Ratified
Musica Angelica
San Bernadino Sym in progress

Pasa Sym ongoing.
LA Jewish Sym
Perf Arts Center of LA “Dance at the Music Center”
Riverside Phil in progress
LA Master Chorale
Pasadena Playhouse

Grants and some other giving drying up, could be
a problem for smaller orchestras

TRENDS
2016 – 12,663 contracts (79 Million dollars in Wages) –
Slightly larger than last year.

Preached union vs. non-union.
Local wants to have rank and file help.  – Hopefully
the rank and file will help the union as much as the
union has helped the rank and file.

MAY DAY – May 1st – international workers day.
Worker  from the union spoke.
Some are working toward a ‘right to work’ situation.
May 1st there will be a March.
Wants members to come out on Monday to march.
MacArthur Park through Pershing Square to City Hall.
[EC: The irony was stifling. Our union has done more
to grow nonunion work than any other entity.]
Many talked in support to the March.

Back to the Pres.
Initiatives – Getting into the building
Discussion – SP562 – single payer health care.
If we can get it passed, it will reduce the problem
of health care in contracts.

Member spoke on SP562. Please help make calls!
Call your state senator to support this bill.

Planning  (5 year plan) will be presented in July.
Want to try to recapture members who’ve left.

VP REPORT
Will be honoring Lalo Schifrin
Concert Oct 7th at the Alex Theater.
Who’s paying for it? Music Fund of Los Angeles
(From the Local), Musicians at Play and Varese
Saraband.

Lots of nego… gives the Pres. praise.

In New York – Nego Live TV. Contract has been
around since 1954. Academy Awards Show –
Got musicians listed on the crawl.
Maybe the Golden Globes, Tonys etc. in the future.

LACC – Herb Alpert School – will be on career
technical advisory board.

SECRETARY REPORT –
2016 –
revenue  – $4,624,000+
cost – $4,543,000+
income $81,827 dollars

Membership drive is on right now.

DIRECTORY COMING OUT – Make sure they have
your most recent info.

We’re part of the Actor’s Fund and can call on
their services. If you know anyone have challenges,
please let them know that the Actor’s Fund is
there to help.

One thing to vote on, but no quorum, so it
was voted on by the board members.

Called Exec. Board Meeting. – no meeting quorum,
did have a board quorum.

Discussed the resolution:

[EC: In short the resolution was this. Currently the
Officers automatically get a COLA (Cost of Living
Increase) every year, though recently they have
foregone them because of the Local’s finances

This resolution would change it so they would only
get a COLA if the Local was in the green enough to
pay for the COLA’s cost TIMES 5.

In other words, if the cola would cost the Local, say
$5,000, the Local would have to make a profit of at least
$25,000 in profit (5 times the cost of the COLA.]

Salary Revue Board spoke in favor.
But wanted to amend it.
Originally, wanted to include board and committees
in COLA (cost of living increase calc. Legislative
committee said they should not do that. Should be
only for the titled officers, a formula to be used to
decide if they get a COLA (Cost of Living Adjustment).
If it shows that the local has been in positive territory
they get the cola, if not they don’t.

Election Board was given as an example – they make
a lot in election years, not much in others.

Remove Article V, Section VI

Much Discussion.

Who does the calculation?
Board member: Couldn’t do it last time because
of the quorum.

Member: Can the officers vote on it? Yes
Can send it to the membership by mail.

Board Member: Board member must recuse themselves
if they have a fiduciary interest.
Parliamentarian: No they don’t.

Motion to accept change was moved and seconded.
Board voted to accept the change.

Explanation:
Committee member: This is an attempt to MODERATE
the salaries by making the cola only be used if the
Local makes enough of a profit to offset the COLA.
(Times 5)

Committee member: Creates a minimum that must be
reached for the COLA to be used. Is a simple floor.

Legislative committee position: Formula was inconsistent
before.

Member asked: There are three months between meetings.
Why couldn’t this have been worked out in those three
months so we don’t have to sit through the minutiae in
a meeting?

Answer: Once the resolution is in print, it can only be
changed in a membership meeting.

Question called: Must vote on amendment first
Amendment restricted it to the titled officers… Passed by board
Now onto the resolution as amended – Passed

Meeting adjourned at 9:45PM

============================================

II. MEMBER SUBMISSION

Member: I believe the reason his title “Music Contractor” is why
he’s not an agent as he characterizes his job.

Also interesting point, at the end of article “embrace all
job opportunities not just the highest paying ones ” and
“We need to modernize without CANNIBALIZING”

Member comment:
I believe it is too late to prevent “CANNIBALIZING” He teamed
up with the other one who eat most everything.

The Man Behind Hollywood’s Top Musicians

FORBES – Apr 27, 2017 @ 07:00 AM

The world’s most famous film music composers are
as well respected as any other mainstream artists
today, and a number of them are even household
names. But the vehicle by which we come to know
and love these composers’ work is via a community
of world-class musicians who bring life to the musical
notes these composers have crafted on paper (or
more likely on a computer). These cellists, trombonists,
percussionists, vocalists, pianists and many more
have recorded the most famous and memorable
scores in history. But how do Hollywood’s top
composers secure the best musicians for their
projects?

Enter Peter Rotter and his company Encompass Music Partners.
Rotter is a music contractor and coordinator, which is
essentially a middleman, who’s been connecting the
harmonious dots since 1987. Having served as a music
consultant to Hollywood film score giants (John Williams,
Hans Zimmer, James Horner, James Newton Howard,
Alan Silvestri, Alexandre Desplat, Henry Jackman and
Brian Tyler, to name a few), it’s safe to say that he
works on more films than anyone else in the entire
music industry. Rotter says, “The fun part of my job
is being a musical casting agent. I basically become
part of the music, and provide the paint colors to the
composer’s canvas.” For example, for Hans Zimmer’s
score for Man of Steel, Rotter contracted ten of the
most renowned drummers on the earth, including
Pharrell Williams and Sheila E (known for performing
with Prince). Rotter also works with Grammy-nominated
Randy Kerber, who is one of the most respected pianists
in Hollywood history. In addition to performing on the
La La Land soundtrack, which Rotter worked on, Kerber
can be heard performing on John Williams’ iconic Harry
Potter theme, as well as songs for Michael Jackson.

Perhaps most unique and exciting to the film music
industry of late is Hans Zimmer’s live show, which
was trending on YouTube after his debut performance
at Coachella. Rotter is responsible for contracting
Zimmer’s string players and choral singers for every
West Coast performance, and the group is now on
tour across the globe.

Today Rotter works with over 60 composers who
specialize in scores across all mediums, including
film, television, video games, commercials, trailers,
records and various forms of new media. He says
that he has worked on over 1,000 film scores and
hundreds of episodes for television. The musicians
that he works with have spent as much or more
time studying as lawyers and doctors. They work
tirelessly to learn and maintain the craft of playing
their instruments. This dedication and hard work
translate into legendary performances that continue
to leave marks on the history of music.

The future of Rotter’s business is at the mercy of
the musician/performer unions and how they adapt
to the new age of content distribution. As more
content is created on new media, the landscape of
performance residuals and player union fees is still
being determined. This leaves challenges for
multiple sectors within the music industry:
performing artists, licensing, performing rights
organizations, film composers and music contractors.
Rotter’s philosophy is that “we need to modernize
without cannibalizing,” referring to the unions’
necessity to adjust to new business models. He
explains that to do this we have to embrace all job
opportunities, not just the highest-paying ones.
Meeting a project’s creative needs should be the
top priority, and introducing a range of budget
tiers will make the industry explode again. Rotter
concludes, “I want to create a legacy that builds
a bridge for the future of the music business.”

Jordan Passman is the Founder & CEO of
SCORE A SCORE, an LA-based company
focused on simplifying custom music and licensing.

=================================

III. MEMBER COMMENT

Local 47 AFM:

I was just visiting the Local 47 website and noticed the heading
of Musicians of Hollywood. There is far more to the jurisdiction
of Local 47 than just Hollywood (and by extension, Recording
Musicians.

For example, orchestral musicians in the Local’s jurisdiction also
have a standing in the world community but you wouldn’t know
looking at the Local 47 Website. No mention of the LA Phil,
LA Chamber Orchestra or LA Opera Orchestra. The LA Phil is
one of the five premiere orchestras of the world. It’s possible
that the LA Phil is producing more dues than the recording
musicians considering the loss of work. Yet they still solely
kiss the RMA Ring.

=================================

IV. NORTH TEXAS DOUBLE BASS CAMP

Early registration deadline is May 2nd for the North Texas
Double Bass Camps. We are filling up so SIGN UP NOW
before the price increases!

Click on the links below to sign up through our new
registration process.

The Bradetich Master Classes: June 20th-24th
For advanced high school and college-aged classical
students. The students receive 5 days of intense
musical training in all areas of bass playing –
orchestral, solo, and technique. Students also
participate in bass ensembles to enhance their
chamber music training.
https://app.getacceptd.com/bradetich

The Beginner and Intermediate Bass Camps:
June 22nd-24th  For any age level. This is a
fun camp, where students get to work closely
with superb bass teachers. Students focus on
advancing their technical facility and work in
a small group setting for lots of personal
attention.
https://app.getacceptd.com/bradetich

LICK HERE  for Camp Flyer

CLICK HERE to DONATE NOW to our bass
camp scholarship program.  If you have
questions or are interested in the camps,
please do not hesitate to e-mail or call
me direct. We are looking forward to seeing
all of you back at bass camp in June 🙂

Tammy Jo Leonard
Double Bass Camp Coordinator
tammy@bradetichfoundation.org
949-285-7522

North Texas Double Bass Camps at UNT

=================================

V. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

——————————————

4/30/17

FREE CONCERT for the Public

THE PHIL NORMAN TENTET
AT THE
Ascension Lutheron Church
Sunday April 30th @ 5pm
1600 E. Hillcrest Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA. 91362

No Reservations Needed

Remembering the classic sounds
& variations of 12 jazz legends
to include:

The George Shearing Quintet
The Dave Brubeck Quartet
The Modern Jazz Quartet
The Cal Tjader Quintet
the Ahmad Jamal Trio
Miles, Dizzy and more

——————————————

5/1/17 DEADLINE

NORTH/SOUTH CONSONANCE
2017 Call for Scores

All composers are eligible for consideration
Solo, chamber ensembles and chamber orchestra works
up to 18 performers will be considered

Vocalists, percussion and/or electronics are acceptable

One work will be selected for recording on the North/South
label

$30 (US Dlls) non-refundable fee per composition
submitted required

Online Submissions at
http://www.northsouthmusic.org/Score-Submissions

Complete submission guidelines at
http://www.northsouthmusic.org/Call-For-Scores

——————————————

5/3/17

Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts series
(concerts every first & third Wednesday at 12:10-12:40 pm)
are listed at http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you for your support in publicizing the Glendale
Noon Concerts!

Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, GNC
818 249 -5108

On Wednesday  May 3, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
pianist Charles Fierro performing Debussy Preludes
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

PROGRAM:
MAY 3, 2017
CHARLES FIERRO Piano Recital
DEBUSSY: SELECTED PRELUDES
The Dancers of Delphi
Sails
The Girl with the Flaxen Hair
What the West Wind Saw
The Engulfed Cathdral
The Interrupted Serenade
The Hills of Anacapri
Minstrels

————————————–

5/5/17

DOCTOR WU PERFORMANCE

We’ll be doing one set starting promptly at 8:00 PM at the Saint
Francis de Sales Festival on Friday, May 5th:

Saint Francis de Sales School
13368 Valleyheart Drive
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

The Doctor Wu Band line up for this show will be:

Tony Egan: Lead Vocals
Leigh DeMarche: Vocals
Jodi Fodor: Vocals
Gil Ayan: Guitar
Steve Bias: Bass and Vocals
Jeff Dellisanti: Saxophones
Mark Harrison: Keyboards
Paul Salvo: Trumpet
Frank Villafranca: Saxophones
Jack Cook: Drums

Admission is free and we look forward to seeing you there!
The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

LETTER FROM CHARLES FERNANDEZ / 802-2008 / LETTER / COMMENT / EVENTS

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

2/3/17
I.  LETTER FROM CHARLES FERNANDEZ

II. FROM THE 802 ARCHIVES – 2008

III. MEMBER LETTER

IV. COMMENTS

V. EVENTS
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===================================

I. A LETTER FROM CHARLES FERNANDEZ

Colleagues,

No doubt some will give each other high-5’s that the local is using
all it’s resources to financially damage a single member who has tried
to make the local more responsive, accountable and transparent for the
rank and file against it’s will.

Here is a letter I have submitted to the Overture. In anticipation of
there refusal to publish it, I share it here.

If you would like to respond, please either respond directly to me,
tronec@charlesfernandez.com or through the responsible47.com site.
Pro or con is of course welcome, and all comments will be published
unless you request it not to be, your name will of course not be included.

As of this date, they still are not giving up on these bogus charges. Perhaps
if enough members call them out they will do the right thing.

I thank you in advance,

Here is the Letter:

To the Editor,

My name is Charles Fernandez. I’ve been a Local 47 member and Emmy/Annie nominated composer/orchestrator/conductor/bassoonist since 1983. I am being targeted for conducting on an educational demo for an English music university. They brought students to Los Angeles to record with Los Angeles musicians. I arranged a connection with a contractor and left it to them. I was at the session to help students in whatever way they needed as an employee of the company. A couple of them needed me to conduct.

Though I am being charged with conducting, conducting is NOT a union craft. The word “conducting’ does not appear in the local’s bylaws. The charges are baseless.

Two former employees informed me that they were told to include a conductor on a contract only IF they wanted to be. We all know why. If they had to enforce a non-existent rule about conducting they’d have to charge a former RMA President who has worked in London countless times. In fact, he’d have a stack of fines a foot high.

Members of the executive board, trial board, all committees, orchestrators, “a” list members and copyists work non-union. They have no choice. My targeting is selective enforcement and designed to hurt me financially.

The lawyer fees I have had to pay are above $10,000 at this point. The letters first came from Gordon Grayson, but now the letters are coming from Louis Levy’s Law Firm.

That means the Local is paying the hourly fees of a professional law firm out of member’s money to target, not a company, nor a studio, nor an orchestra, nor a band, but to target a single member.

A union member who actually played on the session was told they would be charged UNLESS they signed a letter stating they saw me specifically conduct. That is targeting.

While one of the duties of the AFM is to protect members from warrantless harassment and targeting, the AFM has slow walked the process as much as the Local. I cannot get a fair hearing at the local OR the national.

This is the type of conduct our local engages in if you dare speak up. They should be ashamed and are doing nothing but guaranteeing a counter suit for damages.

If you find this as unacceptable as I do, please contact the Local.

Thank you.

Charles Fernandez
Local 47 member since 1983

=========================================

II.  FROM LOCAL 802 ARCHIVE

{EC: Colleagues, Considering how bad things have gotten, this
letter from an 802 member from 2008 should let you how
bad it’s was even 9 yeas ago….)

Archive: Volume CVIII No. 10 October, 2008
Readers Speak Out!
The Musicians’ Voice: Recording at a Crossroads
The Musicians’ Voice is an open forum for discussion about the state of union affairs. The letters published here do not necessarily express the views of Local

802. Letters must be 300 words or less.

RE: RECORDING AT A CROSSROADS

To the Editor:
I’d like to ask my fellow musicians a few questions. How many union film sessions have you done in the last year? Of those sessions, how many do you realistically think will pay any back end? One more question: Who is recording all the low-budget, indie, made-for-cable and foreign film sessions? The bulk of that work, when it actually uses live musicians, is recorded nonunion.

We need to stop living in the good old days when every film was made in Hollywood and every session was with a major studio. Today’s films are made all over the world and even in home studios. Many production companies are put-together operations that don’t have full-time accountants to track secondary markets year after year.

There is a lot of work out there that we don’t have, and we will not get it unless we change the way we do business. I enjoy getting my special payments checks and I would push to strengthen those markets that are still healthy enough to support them. But we have our heads in the sand if we think that all of today’s markets are the same and that one contract fits all.

I am totally pro union. But we must be realistic and not repeat mistakes
made by other unions in the past.

Globalization is a reality. Do you have any idea how little European orchestras
charge for recording? These are orchestras with world-class musicians.

I strongly disagree with those who think that digging in our heels is
the answer. The strength of our union will be in its ability to adapt
with changing technology and its many markets, not with stubbornly
holding on to old practices that don’t work anymore.

==========================

III. MEMBER LETTER from Dr. Len Bergantino

Dear Local 47 Members,

I spoke with Don Vappie a few weeks ago about the selling of Local
47 buildings and properties. Don in my view is the best tenor banjo
player alive today. Wanton Marsalis calls him from New York to play
at the Lincoln Center for Dixieland Jazz.

As tradition  would have it, Don’s father played in the New Orleans
Local with Wynton’s father as did their grandfathers!

Don is aware of the special nature of Local 47. I visited the New Orleans
Local. Don had the following to say:

They sold he New Orleans Local Building which was on Esplanade Street
for One Million Dollars. Everybody was pissed. I hear they sold three
other Locals (he rattled off 3 cities which I do not recall, although I think
Chicago was one of them.)

Don and I both lamented about the tradition of Los Angeles and New
Orleans Locals having g the finest musicians in the world go through
their doors. From Louis Armstrong to my second trumpet teacher’s son,
the great lead trumpet player Conrad Gozzo whose picture was on the
wall of Local 47 doing the 16 years I was a member.

Sincerely,

Dr. Len Bergantino

===========================

IV. MEMBER COMMENT

The union only controls half of the pension fund fiduciaries.
It seem that the only recourse we have to this terrible
performance is to put pressure on them to resign and ask
Ray Hair to replace them with members who have knowledge
of capital markets.

We don’t have any control over the employer appointed
members, other than pressure as employees.
(more…)

PENSION / PRIVACY / FIRST WEDNESDAY / COMMENTS / EVENTS

Friday, January 27th, 2017

12/27/16

I.  MEMBER COMMENT – PENSION
II. MEMBER COMMENT – PRIVACY?
III. ASMAC ‘FIRST WEDNESDAYS’ – DYNAMIC MUSIC PARTNERS
IV. MEMBER COMMENTS

V. EVENTS
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician
===================================

I.  MEMBER COMMENT – PENSION

You’ve probably received the info from the pension fund bemoaning
its ongoing “critical status”. Having been in that status since 2009,
apparently the “fiduciaries” see nothing on the horizon to alter
that status. I think you know that we have a stock market knocking
on the door 20K. So this makes one wonder just what have our
vaunted fiduciaries been doing?

I think we all realize the ever decreasing numbers of membership
across the Federation, more people coming on to collect benefits
than there are existing members to fund, etc. Yet shouldn’t there
be some kind of investment plan that could mitigate against the
negatives, especially in light of markets trending upward over
‘a period of years? We’re all for caution and prudent management…
but good grief!

My question is: Do we, as the rank and file in the Federation,
have any ability/recourse to call the “fiduciaries” (those in
charge of investments) on the carpet for failing to perform?
Curious if you might have any information on this. It seems
ludicrous that the Fund will be in critical status “ad infinitum”.

Any thoughts and info would be welcome.

——————————

I see others are outraged. So frustrating the attitude we get.
Is there not some other form of recourse, like through some
oversight group, rather than just letters to union officials?
There should be some watchdog org. that monitors what
comes down to fiscal malfeasance.
=====================================

II. MEMBER COMMENT – PRIVACY?

At the “inaugural” meeting of 2017, the membership was informed
of some statistics on the number of persons accessing the Overture
On-Line.  X amount of “hits” in the USA and from X number
of countries abroad.

I sent a colleague the following:

My dues statement came and included my Membership #
and “web ID”.  It occurred to me that the local has the ability
to track who is reading the Overture and who is not.

This was the response:

We’ve known for a long time that as long as Marc Sazer
is the webmaster/info guru, that he has carte blanche
access to members’ vital personal data. Who reads the
overture online is minor to me compared with the power
to see the work history, income, employers, etc. of
members. The webmaster can also see the members’
online website viewing history. What someone views
– be it CBAs, wage scales, meeting minutes – tells a
great deal about the viewer. And when that info is in
the hands of someone who controls work… it doesn’t
take a genius.

Name Withheld

Sent from my iPad
====================================

III. ASMAC ‘FIRST WEDNESDAYS’ – DYNAMIC MUSIC PARTNERS

February 1, 2017
7pm Check-in • 7:30pm Program

ASMAC presents:
———-
Dynamic Music Partners

Kristopher Carter, Lolita Ritmanis
and Michael McCuistion

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED
Emmy Award-winning composers Kristopher Carter,
Lolita Ritmanis and Michael McCuistion collectively
known as Dynamic Music Partners, will be the featured
guests at February’s event. The team will demonstrate
and discuss their work in animation music along with
the history of Dynamic Music Partners and their
remarkable collaboration. They will also discuss the
landscape of acquiring projects, how the business
is evolving as well as sharing the experience and
knowledge they have gained over the years.

The team is currently scoring the hit animated series
Marvel’s Avengers Assemble. Michael, Lolita and
Kristopher have created hundreds of hours of music
for a variety of different genres, including TV series,
independent films, video games and live performance
events. They have collectively earned twenty-eight
Emmy Award nominations and nine Annie Award
nominations as composers for Batman: The Brave
And The Bold, Justice League, Teen Titans, Batman
Beyond, The Zeta Project and The New Batman
Superman Adventures.

They each received the Emmy Award in Music Direction
and Composition for their music for Batman Beyond.
Their score to the feature film “Yesterday Was A Lie”
won a Gold Medal at the Park City Film Music Festival.

Additionally, original concert works and suites of their
scores have been performed in festivals and special
events — from New York’s Lincoln Center to The
Hollywood Bowl their music has received critical acclaim.
This remarkable and very contemporary trio of composers
and performers is an example of creative collaboration,
business savvy, and artistic expression of the highest,
most original level.

For more information on their credits, please visit IMDb links:
Lolita Ritmanis http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0728667/
Kristopher Carter http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0141766/
Michael McCuistion http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0567090/

Join us for a very informative and entertaining evening!

Check-In: 7 pm – Program: 7:30 pm

$10 Admission
SCL Members – $5
FREE for ASMAC & Local 47 members

Musicians Union Local 47
817 Vine Street
Hollywood, CA 90038

For more information on ASMAC and upcoming events:
(818) 994-4661 www.asmac.org

==========================

IV. MEMBER COMMENTS

time to drain the RMA swamp

————————————

Hello Editor,

Well, now that Local 47 has gone from …”barely making
the bills” to “money in the bank”…sure why not spend
some of that money to “record our re-transplant” to Burbank?

However, can you see the proposed “music award ceremony”
changing to the “Professional Musician’s of Burbank”?

President Acosta was asked about this at the onset of the
referendum to sell Vine Street.  He said, “then we will
have to change our name”…Really?

Sent from my iPad

==========================
V. EVENTS

———————————–
DEAN AND RICHARD


DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.
—————————————–

1/28/17

MALIBU FRIENDS OF MUSIC at MAHMA
KAIROS MUSICAL SOIREES

A MOZART BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION!
Saturday ~ January 28th
7:30 in the evening.

For Reservations Click Here:
www.malibufriendsofmusic.org

Featuring the:
MALIBU COAST STRING TRIO
Maria Newman, violinist
Scott Hosfeld, violist
Paula Hochhalter, cellist

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Divertimento for String Trio in Eb
KV 563

Ludwig van Beethoven:
String Trio in G Major
Opus 9, No. 1

…and a few surprises…

Performed in the beautiful MUSIC ROOM at the
Montgomery Arts House
For Music & Architecture
Eric Lloyd Wright, architect

Donation $25.00 per Guest
18 and under admitted donation-free

Artists, dates, times, and programming
subject to change without  prior notice

To make a reservation
please visit our website at
www.malibufriendsofmusic.org

Or call the
MAHMA Reservation Line:
(310) 589-0295

Join us at MAHMA
February 11, 2017 and
February 14, 2017
for our romantic
Valentine’s Events:
Champagne & Chocolate

——————————————

1/28/17

Art in Society Presents: IdyTalks – Audrey Carver
Thursday – January 26, 2017
5:30pm
Creekstone Inn, 54950 Pine Crest Ave, Idyllwild, CA 92549, USA

——————————————

2/1/17

On Wednesday FEBRUARY 1, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
oboist Catherine Del Russo
violinist Kirstin Fife
and
cellist Christopher Ahn performing works by
Quantz, Haydn and Fife
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,

610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.

For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

Oboist Catherine Del Russo received her Bachelor of Music Degree and Performance Certificate at the Eastman School of Music where she studied with Robert Sprenkle, and her Masters of Music Degree from Ohio University where she studied with John Mack in Cleveland. Since then, Del Russo has performed around the world, beginning with the Eastman Wind Ensemble to the Far East as Principal Oboe. After that, she performed with the Buffalo Philharmonic, Filharmonic de Caracas and Orquesta Municipal in Caracas, Venezuela. Del Russo has played with many orchestras since moving to Los Angeles, including the Santa Barbara Symphony, Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra, Long Beach Symphony, the Los Angeles Mozart Orchestra, and the Honolulu Symphony. Currently, she is Principal Oboe of Orchestra Santa Monica, Downey Symphony, and Symphony in the Glen, and is Solo English horn for the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Asia America Symphony. Del Russo has enjoyed playing on many films, commercials and television shows. She has been a promoter of chamber music and new music in Los Angeles. Her oboe, viola and piano trio won the Consortium of Southern California Chamber Music Presenters. Del Russo is Professor of Oboe at Westmont College and is on the Applied Music
faculty at Occidental College.

Violinist Kirstin Fife has made many recordings for motion pictures, television, and phonograph, including her own solo recordings, “Czechmate” and “Pieces of My Heart”. Both of these are available at Amazon and iTunes. She is a graduate of the music schools at USC and Yale University. Also a composer, Kirstin is working on several projects, including a 22 piece song cycle for piano and violin.
Website: http://www.pottsandfife.com/welcome.html

A native of Los Angeles, Christopher Ahn has appeared in solo and chamber music performances across the U.S. as well as abroad in Europe, Australia, South Korea, South Africa, Canada and Central America. Recent solo performances include recitals at the Brand Library and Art Center, UCLA, California State University, Dominguez Hills, and Santa Monica College, and concerto performances with orchestras in Los Angeles and Melbourne, Australia. He has also performed chamber music on the Chapman University, Dilijan, L’Ermitage Foundation, Music Guild, and Trinity Lutheran concert series, and has performed numerous times for live radio broadcasts on the Sundays Live recital series at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Chris has enjoyed frequent collaborations in recent years with the Lineage Dance Company, most recently presenting a performance of the Bach Cello Suites with dance choreography on the Brand Library and Art Center Dance performance series. He has also worked closely with several Los Angeles based composers, performing new works for solo cello and chamber ensemble on several local series such as the Blackbird Music Project in Orange County, the contemporary music collective ‘Synchromy,’ and Classical Revolution LA.
Chris pursued his studies at UCLA, the Cleveland Institute of Music, and the University of Michigan, where his principal teachers included Antonio Lysy, Richard Aaron, Stephen Geber, and Colin Carr. He has also studied with Hans Jorgen Jensen, Andrew Shulman, Peter Rejto, John Walz, and Jenny Goss. Chris currently resides in Los Angeles, where he enjoys a broad spectrum of performance and teaching opportunities.
——————————————

2/16/17

THE ORCHESTRE SURREAL
February 16th 8:00
El Portal Theater

The Orchestre surreal will be performing and filming
our up coming concert at the historic
El Portal Theater in North Hollywood.
This is a special event.
If you are receiving this email then you are on our special list.
We want to recognize your loyalty and connection
with the Orchestre and offer you 1/2 price tickets.

For 1/2 price tix
Use the Code Word
ELVIS.
Here is the link
https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pr/961811/prm/ELVIS

——————————————

3/18/16
SFV SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Mar. 18, 2017 –
Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center
Tuttle: By Steam or By Dream Overture
Inaugural Performance
Prokofiev: Symphony #1 in D major (Classical)
Ben-Haim: Pastorale Variée for
Clarinet, Harp and Strings
Geoff Nudell, clarinetist
Beethoven: Romance for Violin and Orchestra
Ruth Bruegger, violinist
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Other concerts in the series

May 13, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Saint-Saens: Bacchanale from “Samson and Delilah”
Tchaikovsky: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in C major
Egizi: Orchestral Suite 
“In Memoria di Mio Padre”
Inaugural Performance

Programs subject to change

——————————————

3/26/17

LOS ANGELES SYMPHONIC WINDS
Subscription Concert 3 – Calabasas High School
Stars of the Los Angeles Symphonic Winds
Revel in the artistry of some of the LA Winds’ most
acclaimed performers.
-Geoff Nudell and Parker Gaims (now a member of the US Marine Corps Band) play Felix Mendelssohn’s virtuosic Two Concert Pieces. Also on the program will be two works by the LA Winds’ resident composer,
– Charles Fernandez

• Sunday March 26, 2017

• 2:30 p.m.  Performing Arts Education Centers.

• Calabasas High School

——————————————
You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

FLASHBACK: JUNE 7th, 2007 / EVENTS

Friday, January 6th, 2017

1/6/17

I. FLASHBACK: JUNE 7th, 2007

II. EVENTS

 
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

 
===================================

 
I. FLASHBACK: JUNE 7th, 2007

This article was from The Film Music Magazine
on the subject of the RMA San Francisco voting
to disband.

How much work have we lost since then?
How much work has been taken or prevented rom
going to other locals (like Colorado) since then?

————————————-

In the latest episode of the internal struggles occurring
within the American Federation of Musicians (AFM) labor
union, the San Francisco chapter of the Recording Musicians
Association has dissolved just days before a critical national
meeting of AFM leaders.

The Recording Musicians Associations is a “player conference”
within the American Federation of Musicians that focuses
on recording musicians.

In a letter sent by the RMA SF chapter to the RMA International
office in Los Angeles, the RMA SF board cited major conflicts
with the RMA International in the areas of film, television and
video game scoring, stating, “Our motion picture and videogame
recording industry is in crisis.”

The RMA SF dissolution letter stated, “Especially with regard
to motion picture, television and videogame recording work,
RMA International seems to exclusively serve the interests
of a small group of musicians in its Los Angeles Chapter.

In turn, RMALA appears to be dedicated to keeping this
work away from RMA musicians in other chapters, and,
in fact, other musicians within their own Local.”
To read the entire RMA SF
dissolution letter, click here.

(Then) RMA International President Phil Ayling sent Film
Music Magazine a detailed response to the RMA
SF letter, and said that AFM (San Francisco) Local President
David Schoenbrun “inappropriately made proposals
to the AFM on the [RMA] Chapter’s behalf and would use
the weight of his office to back-in local approval afterwards,”
Ayling cited what he sees as larger issues with the AFM
and recording musicians, saying, “The closure of RMASF is
all about AFM leadership failure in representing recording
musicians.”

Ayling’s statement continued, “RMA has long been
supportive of commercial recording in San Francisco.
In response to reports of non-union records and jingles,
we worked vigorously with local musicians to confront
that. Neither the [San Francisco] Local President David
Schoenbrun, nor AFM President Tom Lee has made
substantive efforts to organize that employment.”

San Francisco AFM Local 6 President David Schoenbrun,
in a statement to Film Music Magazine today responding
to Ayling’s statement, said that it is every AFM Local’s
right per AFM bylaws to submit proposals on any and
all agreements to the AFM, and that proposals submitted
by AFM Local 6 were approved by the RMA SF Board.

Schoenbrun emphasized that proposals were submitted
by Local 6 because proposals submitted through the
RMA SF must be vetted by the RMA International,
and according to Schoenbrun, “any attempts by RMA SF
musicians to add their input and opinions to RMA
proposals were met with rejection by the RMA International.”

Schoenbrun continued, “The RMA SF letter speaks for itself.
The RMA SF believes that the actions of the RMA International
worked to the detriment of San Francisco recording musicians,
and that is the sole reason the RMA SF membership voted
to dissolve the chapter.

My response to Phil’s accusations that I intimidated
members is, ‘methinks he doth protest too much…’”

FILM MUSIC MAGAZINE
=====================================

 
II. EVENTS

———————————–
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

———————————————

1/7/16

EDENDALE UP CLOSE CONCERT SERIES

Violinist ANNELLE GREGORY & Cellist GEORGY GUSEV
DUO RECITAL
at the
Edendale Branch Library
in ECHO PARK
2011 W. Sunset Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90026
info (213) 207-3000
FREE ADMISSION
Concert in the Community Room
Free parking in the library lot (enter lot from Alvarado).

Saturday, JANUARY 7, 2017
Time: Noon to 1 pm.

http://annelleviolin.com/

PROGRAM:
R. Gliere: 8 Morceaux for violin & cello
M. Ravel: Sonata for violin & cello
G. Handel/J. Halvorsen: Passacaglia for violin & cello

The Edendale Library Friends Society will provide
refreshments following the concert.

Future concerts in this free series at the Edendale Branch Library:
(all concerts are on Saturdays at Noon-1pm)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

MARCH 11, 2017
Maksim Velichkin Solo Cello Recital

JUNE 10. 2017
Fiato Quartet
http://www.fiatoquartet.com

Updated info will be posted at
http://www.edendaleupclose.blogspot.com/

EDENDALE BRANCH LIBRARY Website (with map):
http://www.lapl.org/branches/edendale

This concert is made possible by a grant
from THE HENNINGS-FISCHER FOUNDATION.

Kewa Civic Concerts http://kewaconcerts.blogspot.com/
Kewa Civic Concerts  is a project of the Pasadena Arts
Council’s EMERGE Program. The Pasadena Arts Council
is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Donations to
Kewa Civic Concerts are tax deductible to the full extent
of the law under Federal ID 95-2540759.”

Donation info here:

Kewa Civic Concerts

MORE FREE CONCERTS:
http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com

——————————–

1/15/16

Dear All:

CAL STATE LA / OLYMPIA YOUTH ORCHESTRA

Sunday,  January 15, 2017 at 3PM.
San Gabriel Mission Playhouse
320 S Mission Drive
San Gabriel, CA 91776.

This will be the first public performance of the orchestra
this season, The orchestra is made up of talented young
musicians who gain admittance to perform in the orchestra
through annual competitive auditions, and student of Cal
State University, Los Angeles. The featured soloists this
concert will be John Carpenter, pianist; and Chunyi Zhou,
violinist.

Works will include:
Leonora Overture No.2 by Beethoven
Symphony No.8 by Dvorak
Symphony Espagnole by Lalo
Totentanz by Liszt.

We will also be honoring Dr. Nikolaos Koutouratsas,
the late president of the Hennings-Fischer Foundation
which has given the orchestra so much help these
past years with this concert.

Please come witness the talents of these young musicians
as well as  support classical music in the community. You
do not need a ticket to  get in but if you do need a ticket
with the address sent to you, please feel free to reply and
tickets will be sent to the mailing address you specify.

Looking forward to seeing you there.

Sincerely,
Fung Ho

—————————————–
1/21/16
SFV SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Jan. 21, 2017 –
Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills
Schumann: Manfred Overture
Mendelssohn: Symphony #3 in A minor (Scottish)
Belling: Music Madly Makes the World Go Round
Inaugural Performance
Cary Belling, violinist
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Other concerts in the series
Mar. 18, 2017 –
Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center
Tuttle: By Steam or By Dream Overture
Inaugural Performance
Prokofiev: Symphony #1 in D major (Classical)
Ben-Haim: Pastorale Variée for
Clarinet, Harp and Strings
Geoff Nudell, clarinetist
Beethoven: Romance for Violin and Orchestra
Ruth Bruegger, violinist

May 13, 2017 – Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center

Saint-Saens: Bacchanale from “Samson and Delilah”
Tchaikovsky: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in C major
Egizi: Orchestral Suite 
“In Memoria di Mio Padre”
Inaugural Performance

Programs subject to change
——————————————
You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

WE’RE BACK! / CRITICAL STATUS / EVENTS

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

8/26/16

I. WE’RE BACK!

II. THIRD TIME NOT THE CHARM

III. CRITICAL STATUS FOR AFM PENSION

IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

==================================

 

I. WE’RE BACK!

 

Again and again we’ve had our blog attacked by very

predictable sources, but each time we come back stronger.

This time is no different. We plan on again sending out a

post once a week, and should soon have the mailing in place.

 

========================================

 

III. CRITICAL STATUS FOR AFM PENSION

In the last blog we mentioned that the pension was in critical status.

In case you’ve not yet gotten the info from the federation here is what
it says in part.

The ANNUAL FUND NOTICE is for the Plan Year ended March 31 2016.
Parts of this notice reflect the finances of the Plan as of March 31, 2015,
rather than March 31, 2016.

The plan’s funded percentage was 81.6% as of April 1, 2015
The Plan’s funded percentage as of April, 2016 will not be known
until the actuarial valuation for the most recent plan year, ending
March 31, 2017, is complete, but is estimated to be 76%

Funding percentage for the last available years:
April 1, 2013 – 86.9
April 1, 2014 – 85.7
April 1 2015 – 81.6

——–

NOTICE OF CRITICAL STATUS:
The Plan is considered to be in critical status because it
has funding or liquidity problems, or both. More specifically,
the Plan’s actuary has determined that the Plan is in critical
status because:

(i) the Plan was in critical status last year and, over the next
nine years, it is projected to have an accumulated funding
deficiency for the Plan year ending March 31, 2019 and

(ii) the sum of the Plan’s normal cost and interest for the year,
the present value of vested benefits of inactive participants
is greater than the present value of vested benefits of active
participants and over the next four years, the Plan is projected
to have an accumulated funding deficiency in the Plan year
noted above.
[EC: In other words: There are fewer putting in than taking out.
Membership, dues and work are all down.

HOW MANY?
The total number of participants and beneficiaries covered by
the Plan on the valuation date was 49,947 total.
of which
20,884 were current employees
13,555 were retired and receiving benefits
15,508 were retired or no longer working for an employer and
have a right to future benefits.

[20,884 active / 29,063 retired]

FUND REHAB
This is the fifth year the Plan has been in critical status. The law permits
pension plans to reduce, or even eliminate, benefits called “Adjustable
benefits” as part of a rehabilitation plan. On April 30, 2010, you were
notified that the Board had adopted a rehab plan (the “Rehabilitation
Plan”) that reduced or eliminated adjustable benefits. As of June 1, 2010
the Plan is not permitted to pay lump sum benefits (or any other payment
in excess of of the monthly amount paid under a single like annuity while
it is in critical status. If the Board decides further cuts are needed, you
will receive a mailing explaining the reductions.

Under current law, any reduction of adjustable benefits will not reduce
the level of a participant’s basic benefit payable at normal retirement, and
the reductions apply only to participants and beneficiaries whose benefit
commencement date is on or after June 1, 2010.

The board has not made any additional reductions since the adoption of
the Rehab plan.

WHAT CAN BE REDUCED
-Post-retirement death benefits/guarantees
-Early retirement benefit or retirement-type subsidy
-Benefit payment options other than a qualified joint-and-survivor annuity (QJSA)
-Post normal retirement age subsidy.

CRITICAL AND DECLINING STATUS
A plan is generally is in “endangered” status of its funded percentage is
less than 80 percent. A plan is in CRITICAL status if the funding
percentage is less than 65 percent. (other factors may apply)

The sponsor of a plan in critical and declining status may apply for
approval to amend the plan to reduce current and future payment
obligations to participants and beneficiaries.

A COUPLE OF CLEAR EXAMPLES
A) If a participant with 10 years of credited service has an accrued
monthly benefit of $600, the accrual rate for purposes of determining
the PBGC guarantee would be determined by:
1) Dividing the monthly benefit by the participant’s years of service
($600/10), which equals $60.
2) The guaranteed amount for a $60 monthly accrual rate is equal to
the sum of $11 plus $24.75 (.75 x $33), or $35.75

Thus, the participant’s guaranteed monthly benefit would be $357.50
($35.75 x 10)

B) If the participant in Example I has an accrued monthly benefit of $200,
the accrual rate would be $20 (or 200/10). The guaranteed amount for a
$20 monthly accrual rate is equal to the sum of $11 plus $6.75 (.75 x
$9), or $17.75.

Thus, the participant’s guaranteed monthly benefit would be $177.75
(17.75 x 10)

It is estimated that the fund will continue to be self sufficient for
another 20 years.

For more info contact the fund office at 1 (800) 833-8065 (extension
1311) or email them through the “Contact Us” link on the fund’s web site
(www.afm-epf.org).

You can receive a complete copy of the plan as well if you wish. See the
notice you should have received.

(more…)

RMA LETTER / COMMITTEE RESPONSE /EVENTS

Friday, August 26th, 2016

8/26/16

I. A LETTER FROM THE RMA
II. FROM THE COMMITTEE
III. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

==================================

I. A LETTER FROM THE RMA

The RMA wants you do join…

Dear Musicians,
 
For generations, musicians of every type, players, copyists, orchestrators
and conductors have been drawn to Los Angeles because of our diverse
and dynamic recording industry. More than anyplace else in the world,
Los Angeles has been the direct beneficiary of this incredible pool of talent. 

We are the Recording Musicians Association of Los Angeles. We provide
leadership, research, outreach and resources for the Sound Recording,
Live TV/ Videotape, Commercials and Motion Picture and TV negotiations.
We represent you in legislative efforts to protect employment. We have
been in the forefront of building bridges to protect our intellectual
property rights. And we are your voice with the American Federation of
Musicians. Your generous support ensures that we have the ability to
represent ALL of our members.

This year, we are proud to report several crucial developments in
our business….

RMA played a key role in helping build a new relationship with Sony
Playstation, leading to a groundbreaking live stream with full
orchestra and live gameplay at E3

RMA continues to be at the table in major media negotiations –
SRLA with major record labels, and Videotape with the TV
Networks, and Film/Television with the AMPTP

RMALA is front and center with the Alliance of Women Composers,
Beyond the Red Carpet, Made in Hollywood TV, Made in Hollywood
Film, and more

Plus, the new AFM went to bat for RMA – unanimous defeat for
the anti-RMA Resolution 4 at the AFM Convention.

We are currently kicking off our annual membership drive. Soon,
current RMALA members will be receiving a membership renewal
packet in the mail.  Your donation will help us to continue to
protect and advocate for recording musicians as well as update
our website and app.  You’ll be able to update your information
and get instructions for downloading the directory app to your
mobile device. You can also renew anytime by going to rmala.org 
and clicking the Join/Renew tab or by calling our office at 
(323) 462-4762 to pay with a credit card over the phone. 

If you are not a current RMALA member but do any recording
work at all in Los Angeles, we strongly encourage you to join us.
Your voice and participation are crucial in our constant battle
for a vibrant and healthy recording industry. If you have any
questions or want to find out more about RMALA please call
our office at (323) 462-4762 or go to our website, rmala.org 
and click on the contact tab for the emails of our board members. 

Kind Regards,

====================================

II. FROM THE COMMITTEE

The above comes from the group more responsible than any other
(Along with the acquiescent, spineless AFM and Local 47) for the
staggering loss of work in Los Angeles and Federation wide. There
isn’t even enough work for the few elites left, but they still try to
play the other musicians as fools.

And what does “front and center” mean, does it mean that they
made sure they were the ones to play it? Ten years ago they’d
not consider doing live gigs, now they take all they can find,
since the recording work is a shadow of it’s former self.

AS TO PROPOSITION 4

As to the Proposition 4: It was most certainly anti-RMA, but
it was also pro rank and file AFM Member (Pro-everyone else).
The ones who might get to work on union recording contracts
if there were a buyout.

In the explanation of the resolution printed some time ago,
it was made clear that no one expected the big budget
movies to go buyout, and as long as there were studio
signatories, that is.

What losses have been caused by the spineless AFM and
complicit Local 47 administrations past and present?

Ask any musician and you’ll find out. It was the AFM’s lack
of forethought that lead directly to Seattle, to Nashville,
to Vancouver among others, not including all the fi-core
and non-union orchestras that have been formed.
These locales and countless others in the federation don’t
care about staying loyal to an organization that works only
to protect a minute monopoly in Los Angeles, while everyone
has bills to pay.

What is it that gets the IEB and AFM to totally ignore the
needs of the other 99.8% of members for the pocketbooks of
a few recording musicians as to recording options?

Imagine for a moment:

There is a well paid buyout option for every project other than
big budget films.

Imagine the dues, pension and health and welfare that could
have been collected by the AFM over the last decade if there
had been even a few officers with the cajones to confront the
recording leadership on behalf of the rank and file.

There have, however, been none. None that lasted in any case.
At local 47, whenever anyone made their way onto the Local 47
board who was not “in the club”, their removal was arranged
the very next election.

Anyone who in the past has stood up to the club have found
themselves marginalized, their careers affected as much as
they could be. Bogus charges filed against folks who dared
speak up for the multitude of members too cowed to speak
for themselves. They do nothing, keep their heads down,
imagining that if they stay silent some work might
come their way, which we all know never will – it isn’t there.

Imagine the monies brought in by those recording jobs that
could have eliminated the selling of the Local 47 building
in Hollywood.

Revenues and membership at Local 47 are down, income for
the AFM has been reduced. The lack of revenue has put our
Pension plan into critical condition. The loss of recording
revenue has been a huge burden on the federation, yet
the IEB and the Officers do nothing to turn the situation
around. Nada. Zip.

In the end analysis the question must be asked.
Who is the IEB putting first? The future of the AFM
or the desires and demands of the RMA. And why.

There is no doubt about the RMA leadership. They most
certainly put the needs and desires of their little cadre first,
ahead of the AFM rank and file certainly.

We keep losing members because the AFM has
become a dunsel for most. All they guarantee at
this point is that you have to look over you shoulder
when you do finally get some work, because if it’s
not the RMA doing it it’s not supposed to exist.

If there were any forward thinking leaders among
the recording musicians they’d have seen the damage
done by their organization’s actions and practices
and realized something needs to change if a healthy
recording community is to ever return. Unfortunately,
for a very, very few highly placed long standing RMA
leaders, nothing matters except the size of their
july check, regardless of the damage done to the
Local, the Federation or the tens of thousands of
their fellow AFM Members.

It makes one hope that there really is karma
out there. We’re not holding our breath though.

THE COMMITTEE
(more…)

I. EVENTS

Saturday, August 13th, 2016

8/13/16

I. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

========================

I. EVENTS

DEAN AND RICHARD

DEAN AND RICHARD are now at Culver City Elks the first
Friday of every month.
7:30pm-10;30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584

NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way they
should be.

We are in the back room called the Trailside Room.

Come on down. Guaranteed to swing.

——————————–

8/17/16

“CONCERTS AT THE BOWL”

The Corbin Bowl and
San Fernando Valley Symphony Orchestra
Present
Concerts at the “Bowl” in the “Corbin Lounge”
Wednesday Evenings at 7:30 pm

August 17
The Blues Bandits
Play and sing the “Blues,” featuring 
David Reo, guitar and vocals;
Jimi Dee, guitar and vocals;
Larry Muradian, bass
and
Chuck Burkinshaw, drums

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Other Concerts in the series.

August 24
The Symphomaniax
Perform music from baroque to contemporary by
Bach, Domine, Vivaldi and others, as well as a
selection of “pop” classics, featuring 
James Domine, guitar; 
Ruth Bruegger, violin;
Glenn Grab, ‘cello
and
Larry Muradian, bass
       
August 31

The Screaming Clams – Part II
Rock ‘n’ Roll with music of the ’60s and early ’70s, featuring
Jimi Dee, lead quitar and vocals;
Joel Domine, keys and guitar;
Larry Muradian, bass;
Nick Scarmack, drummer
and
Rebecca Ray, vocalist extraordinaire

“Lounge” at the Corbin Bowl 
19616 Ventura Boulevard, Tarzana

Free Admission/ONE Drink Minimum
Persons under 21 years of age not admitted

—————————————-

8/17/16

On Wednesday August 17, 2016 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
clarinetist Virginia Figueiredo and pianist Lorenzo Sanchez
performing works by Arturo Marquez and Paquito D’Rivera
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

Attached are bios &
color photo jpegs (with instruments) of:
VIRGINIA FIGUEIREDO –  clarinet
LORENZO SANCHEZ – piano

—————————————-

8/20/16

THE PHIL NORMAN TENTET 
One of the best bands today playing in the
tradition of
cool West Coast Jazz

Saturday, August 20th
7:30pm

McCormick & Schmick’s Pilsner Room
2000 Main Street
Irvine, CA. 92614
Resevations call 949-756-0505

Click here to visit Herb Alpert’s Vibrato Grill Jazz

Don’t miss their performance of 
“THEN & NOW”
Remembering the classic sounds & variations of 
12 jazz legends to include:

The George Shearing Quintet
The Dave Brubeck Quartet
The Modern Jazz Quartet
The Cal Tjader Quintet
the Ahmad Jamal Trio
Miles, Dizzy and more

——————————————-

9/10/16

SFV Symphony Orchestra
 
Who:    The San Fernando Valley Symphony Orchestra directed by Maestro James Domine
What:   Announces its five-concert 2016-2017 Concert Season
Where: Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center &Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills
When:  Sept. 10, 2016, Nov.19, 2016, Jan. 21,2017, Mar. 18, 2017 & May 13, 2017.
Why:    Continuing a decades-long tradition of performing great music close to home.
 
Contact: Roberta Hoffman, publicist (ladybirdysue@aol.com)
www.sfvsymphony.com
 
Program information:
 
Sept. 10, 2016 – Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills
Strauss: An der Schönen Blauen Donau
Beethoven: Symphony #7 in A major
Dvorak: Cello Concerto
Daniel Grab, violoncellist
Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen
Bronte Vlashi, violinist 

================================

You can read all previous offerings at:http://www.responsible47.com

UNTIL NEXT TIME,
THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

 

I. EVENTS

Saturday, August 6th, 2016

8/6/16

I. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

========================

I. EVENTS

DEAN AND RICHARD

DEAN AND RICHARD are now at Culver City Elks the first
Friday of every month.
7:30pm-10;30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584

NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way they
should be.

We are in the back room called the Trailside Room.

Come on down. Guaranteed to swing.

——————————-

8/10/16
THIS WEDNESDAY, August 10 from  8:45pm-11:30pm
The BBB is bringing it again
to Joe’s Great American Bar & Grill  in Burbank!

NO COVER CHARGE!!
No reservations necessary!!
21 and older
4311 W. Magnolia Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91505

——————————–

8/10/16

“CONCERTS AT THE BOWL”

The Corbin Bowl and
San Fernando Valley Symphony Orchestra
Present
Concerts at the “Bowl” in the “Corbin Lounge”
Wednesday Evenings at 7:30 pm

August 10
The Screaming Clams
Rock ‘n’ Roll with music of the ’60s and early ’70s,
featuring
Jimi Dee, lead quitar and vocals;
Joel Domine, keys and guitar;
Larry Muradian, bass;
Nick Scarmack, drummer
and
Rebecca Ray, vocalist extraordinaire

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Other Concerts in the series.

August 17
The Blues Bandits
Play and sing the “Blues,” featuring 
David Reo, guitar and vocals;
Jimi Dee, guitar and vocals;
Larry Muradian, bass
and
Chuck Burkinshaw, drums

August 24
The Symphomaniax
Perform music from baroque to contemporary by
Bach, Domine, Vivaldi and others, as well as a
selection of “pop” classics, featuring 
James Domine, guitar; 
Ruth Bruegger, violin;
Glenn Grab, ‘cello
and
Larry Muradian, bass
       
August 31

The Screaming Clams – Part II
Rock ‘n’ Roll with music of the ’60s and early ’70s, featuring
Jimi Dee, lead quitar and vocals;
Joel Domine, keys and guitar;
Larry Muradian, bass;
Nick Scarmack, drummer
and
Rebecca Ray, vocalist extraordinaire

“Lounge” at the Corbin Bowl 
19616 Ventura Boulevard, Tarzana

Free Admission/ONE Drink Minimum
Persons under 21 years of age not admitted

—————————————-

8/11/16

MALIBU COAST MUSIC FESTIVAL

RESERVE YOUR SEATS!  
AUGUST 11 AT 7:30 PM 
MAHMA Great Room
MALIBU COAST MUSIC FESTIVAL
2016 PREVIEW CONCERT

Featuring Festival Artists from
Across the Nation and the World
Performing Exceptional Works of
Antonio Vivaldi, Andre Caplet
W.A. Mozart, Peteris Vasks
and Maria Newman

MCMF 2016 Festival Artists:
Franziska Brech, flutist
Hal Ott, flutist
David C. Neely, violinist
Maria Newman, violinist and composer
Clark Potter, violist
Scott Hosfeld, violist
Noah Rogoff, cellist
James Margetts, pianist

MASTERS OF CEREMONIES:
Isabella Thatcher
Martha Thatcher 

Thursday, August 11th, 2016 at 7:30 pm
This Concert Event will take place in the
MAHMA Great Room
 
 
For more information on the
Malibu Friends of Music
please visit: www.malibufriendsofmusic.org 

—————————————–

8/17/16

On Wednesday August 17, 2016 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
clarinetist Virginia Figueiredo and pianist Lorenzo Sanchez
performing works by Arturo Marquez and Paquito D’Rivera
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

Attached are bios &
color photo jpegs (with instruments) of:
VIRGINIA FIGUEIREDO –  clarinet
LORENZO SANCHEZ – piano

—————————————-

8/20/16

THE PHIL NORMAN TENTET 
One of the best bands today playing in the
tradition of
cool West Coast Jazz

Saturday, August 20th
7:30pm

McCormick & Schmick’s Pilsner Room
2000 Main Street
Irvine, CA. 92614
Resevations call 949-756-0505

Click here to visit Herb Alpert’s Vibrato Grill Jazz

Don’t miss their performance of 
“THEN & NOW”
Remembering the classic sounds & variations of 
12 jazz legends to include:

The George Shearing Quintet
The Dave Brubeck Quartet
The Modern Jazz Quartet
The Cal Tjader Quintet
the Ahmad Jamal Trio
Miles, Dizzy and more

——————————————-

9/10/16

SFV Symphony Orchestra
 
Who:    The San Fernando Valley Symphony Orchestra directed by Maestro James Domine
What:   Announces its five-concert 2016-2017 Concert Season
Where: Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center &Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills
When:  Sept. 10, 2016, Nov.19, 2016, Jan. 21,2017, Mar. 18, 2017 & May 13, 2017.
Why:    Continuing a decades-long tradition of performing great music close to home.
 
Contact: Roberta Hoffman, publicist (ladybirdysue@aol.com)
www.sfvsymphony.com
 
Program information:
 
Sept. 10, 2016 – Tutor Family Center at Chaminade West Hills
Strauss: An der Schönen Blauen Donau
Beethoven: Symphony #7 in A major
Dvorak: Cello Concerto
Daniel Grab, violoncellist
Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen
Bronte Vlashi, violinist 

================================

You can read all previous offerings at:http://www.responsible47.com

UNTIL NEXT TIME,
THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

 

MEETING / POLLINATION REACTION / COMMENTS / EVENTS

Saturday, July 30th, 2016

7/31/16

I. MEETING RECAP – 7/25/16
II. COMMENTS ON “POLLINATION”
III. COMMENTS
IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

=================================

I. MEETING RECAP – 7/25/16
Quorum was not achieved for the meeting on Monday so
there was no official meeting.

Board will decide on the new trial board member themselves
at their meeting on Tuesday.

Moment of silence for all those killed by attacks over the
last few weeks.

Bonnie Janofsky takes minutes since Gary Lasley is on his
way to ROPA. Substitute Parliamentarian standing in.

50 Year Pins: Jay Rosen presented.

OFFICER REPORTS:
President
Negotiations with 21 employers

GRIEVANCES
2016 10 grievances – 6 withdrawn, 2 settled and one is
in arbitration.

EMPLOYMENT
Processed over 5253 Contracts totaling over 38 million

NEGOTIATIONS
Pasadena Master CHorale
Pasadena Symphony
MET
Desert Symphony
Greek
Amoe Symphony and others

Other various events attended:
Screenings
Jacaranda is finally a signatory
Magic Castle charged
John Williams LIFETIME achievement award
Labor Unity – health achievement
State Federation of Labor convention.
Working toward union solidarity
Workshops have been taking place.
Big Sir Jingle Mixer

ORGANIZING
Eric Cruz from the Realtor’s Office who took care of the
sale of the building now is working for us.

New Organizer speaks. Wants to get members more
involved, and figure out how to do that….

BUILDING
Are in escrow on our building. 2 previous escrows fell through.

Alameda building is gone. The place used to sell everyone
on the sale of our building.
We walked away when the seller and the deal got weird.

New Option
Winona Near the Airport – 2 story with elevator – Lot with
150 spots.
Potential problems being investigated
Vapor encroachment – not unusual, but concerning and
must be investigated for effect on the membership. Will
cost thousands to mitigate the problem.
Question: Noise issue? Don’t think so. No commercial
airlines flying over that site.

General sale price is $25,250,000.00

LEGISLATURE
Withdrawn support for the bill AB1199
May re-introduce new bill in 2017

HEALTH CREW
Mergible Plans being discussed
AFM Updates – Best ever according to Acosta – elected to IEB.
Now says he has a real voice.

ELECTRONIC VERIFICATION –
used to do surveys with membership to vote on their contracts
securely. passed.

Parity resolution passed
Still in negotiations with Sound Recording Companies.

OTHER ISSUES
Ca Phil having problems – Canceled all but Disney Hall.

Riverside Philharmonic – They’re having challenges as well.
Could not guarantee wages. Cut performances and made payroll

Star Trek Settlement – Touring group – was at Pantages, didn’t co-operate. Have now settled.

EXHIBIT
Honor Local 767 – the Black Musicians Union. Raising funds.
Find it on the Local website.

—————-

VP REPORT
Glad Acosta is on the IEB starting August 1st.

June 1st – 4th – live TV negotiation in New York – 1st round.
New Media and Music Prep, Clip use. Will meet again end
of September.
Sept 19th – New York – Pamplet B nego
October 17th – Golf Tournament – Brookside Country Club.
Theme will be Broadway.
Thanks to Merisol and Diane Lauerman for their efforts.

Blessed to be the voice for out musicians. It’s exciting.
Everyday’s a learning experience.

Marc Sazar spoke on Video Contract – Right of new media.
Fox and ABC have now started streaming old TV content
immediately. TV like recording and everything else is going
to streaming.

FINANCIAL REPORT
2015 rev 4,319,365 – up from last year
Expenses 4350738 down from last year
Net loss 32,382 in 2015
Loss down a lot from 2014.

2016
1st Quarter – 1,641,218
Clerical 3% raise.

December 13th is the next election at Local 47.
Since no quorum.

Board will decide the trial board position tomorrow.

END OF MEETING NOTES

================================

II. RESPONSES TO “POLLINATION”

How much of OUR dollars has the current administration SPENT
to tell US HOW & WHAT they want US to vote their way?!?
I am sure that the monies the current administration has spent
to persuade us HOW to vote, and how to THINK their way would
have repaired OUR fine old Union building.

It seems that the MORE our union leaders need money to pay,
among other things, their high, fine salaries, the MORE we
NEED to SELL the building.

So what happens when they spend all that money? Do they
have an answer to the DIMINISHING REVENUES coming in
the form of Work and Yearly dues?

Do Mssrs. Acosta, Baptist, and our Secretary/Treasurer have
any answers, MAGIC OR REASONABLE, to revive the work that
has disappeared from Hollywood’s Sound Stages? Do you wonder
at why Rick Baptist stopped playing the trumpet for fun & profit,
and ran for Union office? He is a very intelligent person, and saw
what has happened to our sources of income as many studio
players have found out, the hard way.

I was both lucky, and fortunate, to have worked in the business
from my first record date with Val Alexander in 1959, till thirty
or so years later, when President Bernie Fleischer hired me soon
after as a recording rep. I wanted to keep playing, but I realized
it was time and I had to move on.

Some time later, Max Herman asked me to run of V.P., and I
accepted, thankfully & gladly. As long as you get called to
work, and make a living at playing, music prep, writing,
producing, contracting, or whatever you do in the music
business, it’s usually fun, and great, and we all want to keep
doing it, right? I did it as long as the phone rang!

I was a member of the recording fraternity for many years,
and as a UNION OFFICER I saw the loss of work happening.
I learned first hand, what many producers, and industry
movers & shakers wanted to get rid of; Secondary payments!

You may not like it, but that’s the truth. If you don’t believe,
ask the people that knowŠ people who work with industry,
such as Jay Cooper.

My own first hand encounter of this was when I contacted
the talented composer, Michael Kamen, who is no longer
with us, to ask why he was scoring “Die Hard With a
Vengeance” in Seattle. He told me how much he loved
recording here in Los Angeles, but it because of the producers.Š
My secretary spent most of the week plowing through all the
A.D.’s Secretaries, Special Assistants, etc., till I got Andy
Vagna on the phone. I told him that I’d heard that his company
trucked all the necessary equipment to Seattle, installed it in
a church or chapel that was supposed to have acoustics as
good as Fox or MGM, but blew out every fuse, circuit breaker, etc.,
in the place. Then, after it had all been repaired, the SeattleOrch.
which is no longer affiliated with the Union, packed up one day,
in mid session, according to the story I’d been told, because
they were contracted to do a concert, and had to go.
I asked Mr. Vagna, “Why not do it here?’

He replied, “Cost!” I said, “If your gross was less than 30 mil
the first weekend, I’ll come over and personally Simoniz your
Bentley.” He said, “The back end!” He told him what the back
end would beŠ only so & so much dollars, and he responded
very emphatically, “It’s so many thousand I can’t put in my
pocket!!Š F—- You!” I said, Well, I’d like to talk to you, see
if there’s a way to do thisŠ
” There’s NOT!” and banged the phone down.

I realize that this is a business, and if you are working every
day, and on or in the top 200 or so, Life is Good, and I’m glad
for you. If you’re not, perhaps it’s a fact of Life; and matter
of dollars, and some producers’ sense of business!

The late Lew Wasserman, the former head of Universal Studios,
who was largely responsible for building that Show Biz Empire,
told our former president, Max Herman when we went on strike
for secondary use payments on TV show, “Listen, Max! You and
the musicians are going down the wrong road! We’ll give you
higher scales,more money but we WILL NEVER give you secondary
payments when we resell our TV shows!” Max knew we wouldn’t
want to hear that, and kept quiet about it. But many years later,
Max confided what Mr. Wasserman had told him.

When my fellow musicians were about to lose their homes,
etc., Max stopped me on the stairs to the Credit Union, and
said, “BIll, what can we do to help you members during
this strike?” I responded, “Why don’t you officers forgo your
salaries, and put them into a Relief Fund for the members
who are losing their homes, and so on, as long as we’re on
strike?!?”

Max kind of spluttered, but finally told me, “The By-Laws
don’t allow that!”

I replied,

“THEN CHANGE THE BYLAWS!”

——————————-

LA is getting roughly one third (maybe 40 movies) of all t
he possible theatrical 120 ish releases be it large budget
studio pictures to small budget inde movie shorts – for
various reasons but mostly producers do not want to
work for an organization that has so many flaws and
is ANTI relationship sometimes – not all the time – there
are wins every day with AFM jobs coming back to LA
and also AFM losses every day going out of LA – there is
a global market now and frankly many of the other global
recording locations are providing something better whether
it’s lower cost or “good enough” quality – at the end of the
day – are we in LA doing all we can to remain a location
for recordings? – my opinion is not to offer an answer
but to pose up this question once again – “are we happy in
LA only getting one third of the recording work we used to get?”

I am not…….

================================

III. COMMENTS

Who will run to replace the “bobble heads” on the Board?

(more…)