YOUTH ORCHESTRA AUDITIONS / EVENTS

July 3rd, 2017

7/2/17
I.  OLYMPIA YOUTH ORCHESTRA AUDITIONS
II. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===========================================

I.  OLYMPIA YOUTH ORCHESTRA AUDITIONS

Dear Friends & Colleagues:

It is very important for students to have a good musical education on
top of academics and sports as extra curricular activity during their
school years. The Olympia Youth Orchestra is a high level orchestra
which only performs original standard repertoire as well as works
by contemporary composers. Easy arrangements are seldom included
in the concert programs.

Please kindly spread the word that the Olympia Youth Orchestra will
be holding its annual auditions from now until the end of August.
Interested students should go on the website at
http://www.olympiaphil.org/wp/ and submit the application form
under “youth orchestra”. Audition requirements are scale and solo
piece of student’s own choice plus some sight reading of orchestral
excerpts from the standard repertoire.

Rehearsals are on Sunday afternoons at CSULA. Annual tuition fee
is $650. There are 4 performances each season, 2 on the campus
of CSULA and 2 at the historic San Gabriel Mission Playhouse. Non-
CSULA students will also have an option of enrolling at CSULA for
transferable college credits of the orchestra class for an additional
charge by the university.

Thank you so much!

Fung Ho

====================================

II. EVENTS

 

DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

———————————————-

7/5/17

GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS

Wednesday,  JULY 5, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS will feature
Mandolinist EVAN MARSHALL.

Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Glendale Noon Concerts
818 -249-5108

Evan  J.  Marshall is  an  internationally  renowned
mandolin  virtuoso,  and  is  widely  regarded  as
he  world’s  premier  solo  performer  on  mandolinin
Duo-Style. By  himself,  he  sounds  like  several
of  the  world’s  finest  mandolinists  performing
together. His  stylistic  signature  is  Classical,
with  strong  influences  from  the  Italian and
American  Folk  traditions.  Country  guitar
legend  Chet  Atkins  called  Evan  “A  true
virtuoso,  one  of  the  few  great  musicians
of  our  time.”
Inspired by Atkins  and  violinist  Jascha  Heifetz,
Evan has  created  a  uniquely  recognizable
approach  to  solo  mandolin  performance  that
combines  bass  lines,  chords,  rhapsodic runs
and  tremolo  melodies.  He  started  Classical
violin  studies  at  age  seven,  and  added  the
mandolin  at age 14.

In  addition  to  solo  performances,  Evan  has
been  a  Featured  Guest  Artist in  Pops  concerts
with  a  number  of Symphony  Orchestras,  including
Houston, Phoenix, Long  Beach, Grand  Rapids, Fort
Worth,  San  Antonio,  Jacksonville, and Pensacola.

Two  of  his  solo  mandolin  recordings  have
been  released  by  Rounder  Records:

————————————————-

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

COMMENT ON MUSICIAN’S STORY/ EVENTS

June 25th, 2017

6/24/17
I.  COMMENT ON ‘ONE MUSICIAN’S STORY’
II. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===========================================

I.  COMMENT ON ROBERT’S STORY

Hello Editor!

One of our now deceased members once said…”one day you’re  a star and
the next day you’re parking the car.”  Except for those who have “gamed
the business” the moral of the story is CYA (Cover Your Ass)!

Is there anybody that can’t follow the dots from Universal to today?  See
a YouTube interview with SD from 1994…Really a NON-musician put
into place by a selected few and made a fortune making the selected
few a fortune…

Sickening!!!

Hope all those who are trying to earn a living realize the gravy train is
over…even IF they get a retail call.  CYA!

Member (asked to go Beck Status)  Why not?

interview – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NLaVv2ZWt4

====================================

II. EVENTS

DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

—————————————————————————–

6/25/17

SAXTRAVAGANZA 2017
The members of Saxtravaganza, a local 12-member all-saxophone
ensemble, would like to invite you to their concert this Sunday
evening. This year’s program will take place at

Hart Hall, located
24151 Newhall Ave. (inside Wm S. Hart Park)
Newhall, CA

This is a free concert. Music begins at 7PM.

This year will mark Saxtravaganza’s 18th annual performance
and is the brainchild of Kathleen Maxwell, a saxophonist and
private woodwind teacher in the Santa Clarita area. The group
will perform a variety of music, including marches, rags, tangos,
jigs, movie themes, and fresh arrangements from group members
and area composers.  

Saxtravaganza boasts some of this area’s finest saxophone
students, hobbyists, teachers and professional players who
come together for one week each year, to share their music.
Invite your friends and family to the 18th annual SAXTRAVAGANZA.

For more information about the group, you may contact
Kathleen Maxwell at: (661) 291-1729 or
visit their website at: http://www.saxtravaganza.com/   
or

http://calendar.santa-clarita.com/event/saxtravaganza_2017

Hope to see you this Sunday.
Kathleen Maxwell

———————————————

6/25/17

Dear Doctor Wu Fans,

We will be appearing at the Santa Monica Summer SOULstice Festival
on Sunday, June 25th 2017 from 4:30 to 6:30 PM, where we will play
two sets of your favorite Steely Dan tunes.  Please bring your friends
along and enjoy a great time with us!

Edgemar Courtyard
2440 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405
4:30 – 6:30 PM

We hope to see you there!

The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

————————————————-

7/5/17

GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS

Wednesday,  JULY 5, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS will feature
Mandolinist EVAN MARSHALL.

Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Glendale Noon Concerts
818 -249-5108

Evan  J.  Marshall is  an  internationally  renowned
mandolin  virtuoso,  and  is  widely  regarded  as
he  world’s  premier  solo  performer  on  mandolinin
Duo-Style. By  himself,  he  sounds  like  several
of  the  world’s  finest  mandolinists  performing
together. His  stylistic  signature  is  Classical,
with  strong  influences  from  the  Italian and
American  Folk  traditions.  Country  guitar
legend  Chet  Atkins  called  Evan  “A  true
virtuoso,  one  of  the  few  great  musicians
of  our  time.”
Inspired by Atkins  and  violinist  Jascha  Heifetz,
Evan has  created  a  uniquely  recognizable
approach  to  solo  mandolin  performance  that
combines  bass  lines,  chords,  rhapsodic runs
and  tremolo  melodies.  He  started  Classical
violin  studies  at  age  seven,  and  added  the
mandolin  at age 14.

In  addition  to  solo  performances,  Evan  has
been  a  Featured  Guest  Artist in  Pops  concerts
with  a  number  of Symphony  Orchestras,  including
Houston, Phoenix, Long  Beach, Grand  Rapids, Fort
Worth,  San  Antonio,  Jacksonville, and Pensacola.

Two  of  his  solo  mandolin  recordings  have
been  released  by  Rounder  Records:

————————————————-

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

ONE MUSICIAN’S STORY / EVENTS

June 17th, 2017

6/17/17
I.  ONE MUSICIAN’S STORY
II. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===========================================

I.  ONE MUSICIAN’S STORY

Robert Matsuda is a violinist who has contributed to film
and television scores since 1996, including the feature
film The Horse Whisperer (1998) and the blockbuster
television series Lost (2004–10)

A member of the Union of Professional Musicians, Local 47, in
Los Angeles, Robert recalls the heyday of motion picture
musicians and describes the ways in which producers have moved
much of the work overseas or resorted to licensed pop songs or
computer-generated music.

QUESTION:How did you get your start with orchestral soundtracks?
Your first film was The Horse Whisperer, correct?

I did a film before that in which my friend put together the musicians
for a Pauly Shore movie called Bio-Dome (1996)
.
Interestingly enough, the residuals for Bio-Dome went on, and on,
and on. At the back end, it actually paid better than The Horse
Whisperer. I’m probably still getting checks for Bio-Dome. It was
officially my first movie project.

QUESTION: How did you get your foot in the door?

When I was a teenager studying the violin, I had a teacher, who
was part of the Fox orchestra back in its heyday. You can see
him in the Marilyn Monroe movie How to Marry a Millionaire
(1953)
.
He would tell me about playing for the movies while I was at
my lessons. It sounded like a really great thing! You’d be playing
your instrument, and it would allow you to make what I assumed
would be a comfortable middle-class living. I knew that was what
I wanted to do when I grew up.

Bio-Dome came out in 1996, and I got that job after about ten
years of going around playing for concertmasters and contractors
and trying to get my foot in the door. When people ask, “How
do you get started?” I have to disabuse them of the notion that
there’s a clear-cut way of getting into this kind of work, at least
what’s left of it. And it’s different for everybody, because it’s
not like applying for a job at an insurance company.

I got the Bio-Dome job because I was a friend of the contractor
who got the job because he was a friend of the composer. They
both attended the same high school when they were younger.

QUESTION: That got you started. What kept your career going?

I had a good stretch of work after Bio-Dome, until 2006. I got
my position on The Horse Whisperer through a connection
with the composer’s family. I had been working with volunteers
for about ten years at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
(LACMA), and the word got around that I was a violinist.

One of the volunteers was related to the composer for
The Horse Whisperer and she put in a good word for me.
I owe that job to her. Then, once I was playing for him, I started
getting hired to play on his other films and things expanded
from there. It’s critical for instrumentalists to end up on a
contractor’s list. They are responsible for hiring people to
play in the orchestra.

QUESTION: How do you get on a contractor’s list?

It’s a nebulous process. There are so many ways! You play
for people, like the lead violinist, who is called the concertmaster.

Of course, those people have an inflated sense of their own power.
People have to play for them; they’re the gatekeepers who make
recommendations to the contractor. My entrée was through a family
-work connection. The composer then told the contractor to contact
me. And of course people know each other from school, “Oh, I went
to Juilliard with so and so.” They recommend you to the contractor.
People even say there’s a casting couch.

When composers are young and they’re trying to make it, they need
a reel. They need projects to work on, and they often seek out student
filmmakers at film schools. The composers don’t make much money,
which means they can’t pay the musicians much, if anything at all.

Oftentimes they will ask musicians to volunteer: “I don’t have a lot
of money, but I’ll buy you pizza. Can you help me score the short
film I’m working on?” Musicians will agree to do the work in the
hope that the composer’s profile in the industry will rise and that
they’ll take you along for the ride. But that doesn’t always work.
In fact, a major beef with my colleagues is that they’ll play for
free! Worst of all, when people you play for become more successful,
they tend to forget that you once did them a favor. Of course, I
imagine that if there’s a lot of money on the line and if the young
composer has a choice between working and not working, they’ll
say to the contractor: “Okay, fine, just take care of it. I’m sorry I
have to leave Robert and his friends behind, but, this is my chance.”

So, it’s a complex process. By the way, the same can be said about
contractors. They might use you once—if it is helpful to them—and
never hire you again. So the contractor is a central gatekeeper.

They’re like Saint Peter, they are so powerful. In fact, there are one
or two who are enormously powerful and influential. For a long time
during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, there was one woman named
Sandy DeCrescent who controlled access to 90 percent of the work.

She retired, and one of her assistants, Peter Rotter, took over. Then
he controlled 90 percent of the work. At some point after the transition,
Sandy and Peter got into an argument over some business or personal
matter. Now she’s back in the game, and they’re mortal enemies! I’ve
never seen them. To me, they’re like the Wizards of Oz. I’m not in the
90 percent world. I’m in the 10 percent world. And for a good stretch
of time, 10 percent was pretty good. But now, that amount of work
is so much smaller that it breaks down to almost nothing.

QUESTION: Do contractors tend to hire the same people? Do orchestras
stick together from film to film?

Contractors put together an orchestra for each film. And there are
contractors who attach themselves to certain composers. So this
creates a degree of expectation: if you played on one composer’s
film, you will likely play for all of their films.

Composers like to work with people they know and trust; so do contractors.
But there are no guarantees.

QUESTION: When contractors reach out to people, are they asking for
an audition?

No, they know you already. They know they want you. It’s more of a
conversation about money, time, and availability.

QUESTION: When you were working consistently, how often were
you working?

Before I did The Horse Whisperer, I was working at LACMA, so I
didn’t live on my music work. I would do community orchestras,
weddings, and any kind of live music work that I could get.
Even after The Horse Whisperer I still wasn’t getting
enough work to quit the museum, but by that time I had accumulated
so many sick days, vacation days, and free days that LACMA wanted
me to take days off. That was great because I would get a paid day
off and be able to do a movie.

I met my mentor, Harris Goldman, on The Horse Whisperer.

I was very fortunate to meet him; he had great relationships with
many different composers and orchestrators. Orchestrators are
important because they often write the music for a film based on
the composer’s ideas. Orchestrators possess the technical know-
how to translate those ideas into sheet music. Connections to
composers and orchestrators are helpful—obviously they’re both
powerful, and they can make recommendations to the contractors.

Harris introduced me to Graeme Revell, who has since retired. He
also introduced me to a young composer named Michael Giacchino,
who is huge now. I think I did his first non-video-game project,
which was the TV series Alias (2001–6)
.
Alias led to Lost.

For a while, Lost and Alias were on at the same time, and then he
started doing movies—Pixar movies like
The Incredibles (2004), Ratatouille (2007), and others.

So, right there, I had access to Thomas Newman on some good
films. I was doing Pixar movies and any other movie that Michael
Giacchino was doing, and dur ing a brief period, I was doing both
Alias and Lost.

One week I’d go in and do Alias and the next week I’d do Lost.
And then Alias went off the air, but I still had Lost.

QUESTION: Can you describe a typical day?

For episodic television, it’s a short day. An episode of TV for an
hour-long show like Alias or Lost, which is called a single,
usually requires three hours: typically from ten in the morning
to one in the afternoon, with a ten-minute break at the top of each
hour. For a motion picture, there’s more footage that needs to be
scored, so depending on the nature of the film, it could be one day,
known as a double session. That could mean about six hours with
a lunch break, or it could mean a whole week.

QUESTION: Do studio musicians need a second income?

I would say the most successful people have a regular flow of
studio work across film and television. But they also teach and
play in other orchestras, like the opera or the Los Angeles
Chamber Orchestra. However, they always have studio work
at the core of their career.

QUESTION: How much can you make in a recording session?

If it is a standard budget, a rank-and-file musician can make
about $80 an hour. That’s not bad, and you get money on the
back end as well. There is also low-budget, and now something
called low-low-budget, which pays considerably less.

QUESTION: What is the back end?

Some office in Encino tallies it up, and it’s predicated on things
like video sales, DVD sales, and what happens overseas. They
tally all of the projects that you have worked on and your
percentage of royalties, and then you get a check in the
summertime. You get one check for film and television, and a
smaller check the next month for any kind of phonograph work
you’ve done. (They still say “phonograph” even though it’s an
incredibly outdated term.) It refers to work you’ve done on
commercial music, like albums or singles.

With your check, you get a long itemized statement, and it
behooves you to look at it closely to see if they missed anything.
It happens. But it’s also really interesting to see the different
trends across the film and television you’ve done. Like
I said, I’m still getting money from old projects like Bio-Dome.
It’s maybe $10, but it’s money! Other films have a huge drop off.
For instance, Star Trek (2009) made some good money at first,
and then the next year it went down a little, and then
down, down, down, down very quickly. It was a rapid drop.

Both Lost and Alias made a lot of money in international and
ancillary markets.

QUESTION: Over the course of time, how much money could
you expect in residuals?

It was pretty good money. It wasn’t astronomical like it is with
some movies, but it was always a nice check. I don’t recall
exact amounts, but the back end on those shows could pay your
rent for the month. It’s always surprising what pays well on the
back end. Some projects that you think wouldn’t do well end
up paying you the most.

For example, I have a friend who did a sidelining job on the movie
I Love You, Man (2009). He was playing in a quartet at the
wedding at the end. Sidelining means you appear on camera,
almost as an actor. Usually you’re miming to prerecorded music;
you’re just there as a visual. And nobody wanted to take the job!
You had to go up to Malibu every day and be there really early,
and it just didn’t seem like a terribly good job, but because there
was no other scored music— every other song on the soundtrack
was a pop song—they got this large sum of money! Divided among
the four of them, they got really, really good money on the back end.

Another friend, a bass player, had an appearance on a Chili’s commercial.
He was playing the bass with a jazz singer. When he first heard about
the job, he wasn’t going to audition for it, but we convinced him. I think
when everything wrapped up he probably made $10,000 for that, which
is excellent for essentially one day’s work.

QUESTION: When you look at the itemized list of residuals, what have
been some of your biggest surprises, other than Bio-Dome?

A movie that paid very well was The Incredibles. We knew that it was
going to make some good money because it was very successful. But
it was worth thousands of dollars for me! Everybody was asking about it:
“Did you get your check for that?” Because, you know, not everybody
is in that top echelon of musicians, where they’re working for everyone
all the time.

A lot of the musicians in Los Angeles are just like me, waiting for that
elusive studio call, which has become more and more rare.

QUESTION: What happened? You said you started to notice a change
around 2006 or 2007.

What happened was just an acceleration of trends that were already in
place. Costs all come out of the producers’ pockets. I only make scale,
but other people in the orchestra, say a section leader, get double scale.
And if a contractor hires someone we call a doubler—someone who is
hired to play more than one instrument—scale pay is automatically higher.
Plus, the contractor could be making double or triple scale. So it all starts
to add up before you even calculate the back end, which also increases
depending on your scale pay. I think producers began to say, “This is
an unnecessary expense. Let’s go overseas. Let’s go to London.”

They have nationalized health care so there are no benefit costs for
producers. They don’t pay any residuals. There is no union. The musicians
just get paid their hourly rate for their time in the studio.

George Lucas has all of his films done in London. He has always been
virulently antiunion. On the other hand, Thomas Newman has always
been committed to scoring his films in L.A. He comes from a film
music dynasty, so I think he has a strong sense of loyalty to keeping
business in the city. He is loyal to musicians here. His father was
Alfred Newman, his uncle was Lionel Newman, his cousin is Randy
Newman, and his brother is David Newman.

Nevertheless, he got the 007 franchise, and that does not leave England,
so now he has to go over there and use their musicians.

Of course London has a lot of incredibly talented musicians. But if you’re
already in the London Symphony Orchestra, you have that work, so film
jobs are just extra cash. Even if you’re not in the London Symphony
Orchestra, or the four or five other orchestras there, there are lots of
opportunities.

From what I understand, Abbey Road and Air Studios are open night
and day, seven days a week. It’s incredibly busy. Freelance musicians
are scoring films or video game soundtracks. Video games are a huge
market now! Some of them have better production values than motion
pictures. I did some of that ten years ago. I started working on Call of
Duty and Medal of Honor. We basically created motion picture
soundtracks, using a big orchestra. But the video game companies have
become even more tightfisted about residuals and in negotiating with
the unions. They’re basically saying, “We don’t need to do this anymore.”

Whatever pugnacious tactics the unions had unfortunately weren’t
enough to prevent studios from going either overseas or out of state
to find musicians who would accept their terms. I think Seattle was
the first city to break away from the national union.

QUESTION: How pugnacious was the union when this trend started?

I think it was mainly verbal. I don’t think there was a lot of punch
behind it, compared to the other [motion picture] unions. The
musicians’ union doesn’t have as much power. When writers
go on strike, you have no content, so things grind to a halt.
But when musicians go on strike, they say, “Well, we’ll just go
out of town.”

QUESTION: Why is it so easy to go out of town? Don’t directors
and producers want to be closer to the action when they’re in
postproduction, to oversee the development of the soundtrack?

You would think, but then you have to consider the money, and
that’s all the producers and studios are worried about right now.
A studio is just a distribution channel owned by a much larger
global entity. And because they’re multinational corporations,
they have to answer to the bottom line.

The executives who run these multinational corporations likely
have no interest in film music or where it is done. They just
have to answer to shareholders. Accountants have much more
power than they used to. Can you save money by going to
London, or the Czech  Republic, or Macedonia, or Seattle?
If so, we’ll do it!

QUESTION: Where do they go? We know about London and
Seattle.

The Czech Republic is very big.

QUESTION: Why the Czech Republic?

It’s an incredibly musical place. Mozart in his time was
more popular in Prague than in his native Austria. The
country has a rich tradition of symphonic music that includes
Antonin Dvořák and other Czech composers. And the cost
of living is lower there, so wages are lower, and producers
don’t have to pay into health care.

They don’t have to pay the back end. You just have to pay
the musicians for their time in the studio.

QUESTION: What other places?

Well, that’s enough to sink the ship. But London is the biggest,
by far. Dreamworks Animation is 100 percent London. Until
the latest Star Wars, George Lucas did his recording in London.

The new one was done here in L.A., but I don’t know why.

QUESTION: Besides the battle over payments, what else is
making jobs disappear? I think our tastes in music have changed.
When you turn on the radio now and listen to Selena Gomez or
Katy Perry, oftentimes you’re not even hearing real instruments.
Those songs are purely electronic productions done by producers.
People don’t expect strings or real instruments backing up the artist.

Recorded music also has good sampling. A very good producer or
somebody with a suitable keyboard can get what passes for a good
string sound, and the samples are getting better and better. People
don’t expect to hear a natural, acoustic-sounding backdrop when
they hear popular music these days. Those jobs used to be important
sources of money when you weren’t doing film or television work.
Now you only expect to see violins or symphonic instruments,
as a visual. If Michael Bublé is doing something on PBS, you may
see actual instruments and musicians like me. Or if they’re doing
a studio session, I might get a call. But when it comes time to do
it live, they don’t want to see me. Directors will probably try
to get a pretty, willowy, young, white, blond woman to put on the
set. Somebody’s getting the work, at least, but it’s not me.

We had no idea this transition has been afoot. It’s startling,
especially when you consider the significant role that music
plays in most Hollywood films.

Oh, there’s no reason to apologize. Musicians are invisible,
so things can happen to the musicians and the general public
doesn’t know. That’s why I’m so eager and willing to go on
record, or talk to people about changes in our business.

I don’t want to be in politics or anything, but I do want to tell
people that musicians do exist, and I want to emphasize that
when you hear music in a motion picture, it’s played by real
people. Sometimes the music is done so incredibly well,
like with Thomas Newman, that it becomes part of the
narrative. The music is essential for propelling the narrative
of the film.

I think the whole transition has been manipulated in very
clever ways, even through union negotiations. Like I said,
unions don’t have a ton of power, so when they capitulate,
they often turn around to frame it as a benefit. They’ll say,
“We have this new agreement with the studios where a
certain amount of work has to be done in town.” On the
surface that sounds great! But the studios still determine
what work stays and what work goes. So they’ll do a bunch
of films Attack of the Killer Tomatoes: Part VIII in L.A., and
take prestige projects elsewhere. There’s a very tangible
difference for musicians between working on a low-budget
feature versus a big-budget prestige project.

QUESTION: In another interview, you were quoted as saying
that access to job opportunities is now extremely political.
Can you elaborate?

We had various watering holes in our business. I had my
watering hole with a few other animals. Other animals
were at different watering holes. I was at the Thomas Newman
–Michael Giacchino watering hole. It turned out to be a good
watering hole to have, but now these other watering holes,
which provided a lot of work, have dried up and those animals
are coming over to my watering hole, and the more politically
and powerfully connected musicians have the ability to push me
aside, if they want.

QUESTION: What kind of scoring work is still done in L.A.?

Luckily for me, two of the composers who still score here are
Thomas Newman and Michael Giacchino, and there is some
pop music that needs strings. If you Google my name you’ll
see some of the sound—not soundtrack but phonograph—work
I’ve done. I’ll do work for artists like Beck. Beck’s father,
David Campbell, is an orchestrator. So, right there, Beck has
an in-house person to do string arranging for his records. But
that type of work is increasingly rare. Today it’s mostly when a
producer wants some strings to make something more romantic.
They call it sweetening. If a popular artist like Katy Perry does a
ballad, that’s good for us because we might get the call for that,
but again, that doesn’t happen all that often. It’s just not the
predominant sound in popular music. They needed strings more
often during the disco era. My god, you listen to a disco album
that was recorded in the mid- to late 1970s and everything has
strings.

A lot of the work that made for a middle-class living was not
particularly prestigious. It was just work, and there was a lot of it.
For instance making commercial jingles for Safeway, and things
like that. Back then they used real musicians for jingles. The only
time you’ll hear an orchestra on television now is when you watch
The Simpsons (1989–ongoing), Family Guy (1999–ongoing), and
maybe one or two other animated things. Animation seems to require
real musicians.

Desperate Housewives (2004–12) used an orchestra when it was on
the air, but since the demise of Aliasand Lost, I don’t think there’s
been a lot of orchestra work for non-animated TV.

It’s just not looking good for musicians. People are taking early
retirement and taking their pensions. All it requires is that the
musician not accept any work for a year, and then he or she can
start getting pension payments. If work does come in
after that, you can take it, but that means we are essentially
bankrupting our pension fund. My royalty check is being taxed
at 1 percent, which then contributes to the retirement fund, which
is currently in the red. Hopefully the union can rebuild the coffers,
but right now we don’t know if there will be any money left when
my peers and I are ready to retire. I just assume I’m going to
somehow continue working when I’m ninety years old.

Let’s hope I’m able to!

QUESTION: What are you doing today?

I’m lucky that a couple of my friends made a financial intervention.
They took me out to lunch and reminded me that I inherited my
parents’ house after they both died in 2011. Since then, I had
been living in their house and slowly going broke.

They said, “You live in a great house. You have a swimming pool,
a view of the city, and you’re in Los Feliz. Fix up the house and rent
it.” Even though I was still grief stricken, I said, “Okay, I’ll do it.”
I got a loan, fixed up the house, and got a realtor. There were a couple
of offers that fell through and then somebody I had heard about and
liked from the entertainment industry came and loved the house. He
was a novelist for many years prior to becoming a showrunner.
One of his stories got made into a TV show and that totally changed
his life. Now he was working on another show, so he decided to
move to L.A., and he rented my house. I’m not out of the woods,
but at least I’m able to pay for an apartment down the hill from
my house and start paying off my debts. I hope he stays there
forever; he’s a great guy.

So the pressure has eased somewhat. Now I view myself more
as a landlord than a musician sometimes. Some musicians say
you have to do things like that, and a couple of players I know
became real estate agents, but that profession is also subject to
the market’s whims. Some older players have also invested in
property, so I have this little thing with the house and hopefully
there’ll be a point where I’m no longer paying off the debt. I’m
getting money from whatever is left from my movie, television,
and phonograph work. I’m sorry I can’t paint a brighter picture.

====================================

II. EVENTS

 

DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

—————————————————————————–

6/21/17

Info about upcoming programs through AUGUST 2017
at the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts series
(concerts every first & third Wednesday at 12:10-12:40 pm)
are listed at http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you for your support in publicizing the Glendale Noon Concerts!

Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, GNC
818 249 -5108

On Wednesday  June 21, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
violinist Jacqueline Suzuki  and pianist Frank Basile performing
works by Ravel, Mozart and Debussy at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

JUNE 21, 2017 Program:
Violinist JACQUELINE SUZUKI
Pianist FRANK BASILE

MAURICE RAVEL Violin Sonata No.1 in a minor, “Posthumous” 
W.A. MOZART Sonata for piano and violin in e minor, K.304
CLAUDE DEBUSSY La plus que lente for violin and piano

JACQUELINE SUZUKI, violin, is a longtime member of the Long Beach and Santa Barbara Symphonies. A native of San Francisco, she began her earliest chamber music studies on scholarship at the San Francisco Conservatory. She has performance degrees from the Mannes College of Music (BM), where she studied with William Kroll, and the California Institute of the Arts (MFA).
As a Los Angeles freelancer, she has performed with many ensembles and in many genres, from rock, jazz, Latin and Arabic, to playing in the pit for the Bolshoi Ballet and onstage with the Three Tenors. She has recorded with diverse artists: Snoop Dogg, Neil Sedaka, Leonard Cohen, Whitney Houston, Bocelli, Lalo Schifrin, McCoy Tyner, Placido Domingo and many others, and appears on recordings by the Long Beach, Santa Barbara and Pacific Symphonies. She has spent summers at the Peter Britt, Oregon Coast, Carmel Bach and Cabrillo Festivals and has performed in a string quartet “in residence” on a raft trip down the Green River in Utah. Tours have taken her many times to Japan, Taiwan, Mexico, Canada, Europe, the Middle East and throughout the US. She initiated and curates the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts http://glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com and also the Edendale Up Close Concerts: http://edendaleupclose.blogspot.com

Frank Basile is a harpsichordist, pianist, organist, conductor, musical director, accompanist, singer, church musician, composer, arranger, orchestrator, and teacher. His career has brought him to Los Angeles recording studios, the choir lofts of churches throughout the United States and Europe, any number of theaters in Los Angeles, and the stages of Walt Disney Concert Hall and Carnegie Hall. Versatility has been the hallmark of his work, which has included teaching at USC, Loyola Marymount University, Santa Monica College, and Campbell Hall High School. He is a staff accompanist at Santa Monica College and Loyola Marymount University, an adjunct lecturer in Music at LMU, and director of music at St. Bede’s Episcopal Church in Los Angeles. He studied at Yale University, Northwestern University, and the University of Southern California.

——————————————————-

6/24/17

Song of the Angels Flute Orchestra
Saturday, June 24th at 4 p.m. at
La Crescenta Presbyterian church.
http://www.lcpc.net/
with guest arranger conductor Shaul Ben-Meir
and guest soloists
David Shostac and
Gary Woodward

Concert is free!
Donations are encouraged.

Shaul will be conducting his arrangements of:
Faure Pavane
DeFalla Suite,
Mendelssohn Ruy Blas Overature,
Night on Bald Mountain
and
Radetsky March.

David Shostac and Gary Woodward will be
bringing their musical flute colors to perform
Saint Saens –  Benedictus
and
Bach Violin Double (1st movement).

We will also be opening the concert with
John Williams Fantasy Medley and
Basin Street blues arranged and conducted
by our own esteemed
Charles Fernandez….

Whew – This concert will be awesome!!!

——————————-

6/25/17

Dear Doctor Wu Fans,

We will be appearing at the Santa Monica Summer SOULstice Festival
on Sunday, June 25th 2017 from 4:30 to 6:30 PM, where we will play
two sets of your favorite Steely Dan tunes.  Please bring your friends
along and enjoy a great time with us!

Edgemar Courtyard
2440 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405
4:30 – 6:30 PM

We hope to see you there!

The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

I. PLAN PARTICIPANTS / COMMENT / SANTA BARBARA WORKSHOP / EVENTS

June 5th, 2017

6/5/17
I. AFM-EPF PLAN PARTICIPANTS
II. MEMBER COMMENT
III. FROM KIM RICHMOND
IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===========================================

I. OPEN LETTER TO AFM-EPF PLAN PARTICIPANTS:
Response to 5/19 Funding Status Update from the AFM-EPF

Dear Plan Participants,

By now, many of you received an email from the AFM-EPF stating that our
pension fund earned better-than-expected returns in 2016, and we will
not be entering critical and declining status for the next fiscal year
(read that email here). Avoiding critical and declining status means that
our trustees will not be able to file an application to the U.S. Treasury to
cut our hard-earned pension benefits. Under the law, the cuts could be
up to 70% of accrued benefits (use this calculating tool to see the
maximum reduction you could face).

We are not out of the woods, however, and far from it. Our fund

could very well enter critical and declining status this time next year.
In the meantime, it is important that we participants become as
informed as possible as to the inherent problems and solutions.
Musicians for Pension Security (MPS) is requesting that the AFM-EPF
trustees make decisions with input from the participants, and not
be selective about what information they share. They must find a
long-term solution that does not cut accrued benefits without
the fully informed consent of the workers affected, and they must
proceed with complete transparency.

We are aware that certain AFM-EPF Trustees actively support MPRA,
the law that gives them the right to cut our benefits. This law is
controversial as it was passed by Congress in the middle of the
night in 2014 without any debate or hearings. Numerous Senators
and Congressmen on both sides of the aisle, including Bernie Sanders
(D-VT) and Rob Portman (R-OH), believe that MPRA is an unsound
law that hurts workers. They want it repealed, or very substantially
revised. Policy alternatives exist and have been introduced by members
of Congress. These alternative proposals recognize that cutting
accrued benefits without the consent of the workers, particularly
workers who are retiring soon, is morally unacceptable.

We are also aware that our crisis follows a decade of bad investment
management by the trustees. The ten-year investment return for
the fund has been a measly 3.2% net of investment fees, which falls
far short of the trustees own investment goal of 7.5%. To make up
for the poor performance, the trustees are taking more risks with
our investment portfolio. Currently, approximately 32% of Plan
assets are allocated to private equity and alternative investments.
That is $600 million in notoriously risky, illiquid and opaque ventures.
MPS has formally requested the trustees disclose more precise
information regarding the fees and net returns of our private equity
investments. Participants must judge the true performance and arrive
at an informed decision to our prospects going forward.

Many plan participants are unprepared for pension cuts and
face dramatic hardships if they are made. Cutting benefits
without the consent of the workers is not in the interest of the
majority of plan participants. It is something we as a united
majority cannot accept. We as Membership must band together,
speak up and hold our leaders accountable.

In order to stay informed and work with the AFM-EPF, Musicians
for ‘Pension Security has sent a formal request for more plan
information to our Fund Administrator. A copy of that information
request can be found here.

Sincerely,
Members of Musicians for Pension Security

===================================

II. MEMBER COMMENT

Hi there!

Just wanted to alert you to a book that is coming out from University of
California Press that has an chapter-length interview with me regarding
film scoring in Hollywood.  The publisher is sending me a copy, so I don’t
know how it ultimately turned out.  But I did speak VERY candidly about
my story . . . and how many of our colleagues face the same problems.

Funny thing is, since the interview for the book, which I did a few years
back, I’ve been dropped by MG and seem to have been also dropped by TN.

So I’m dead in the water.

Well, at least I had a chance to vent – and it’s there on the printed page!
https://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/11966301

=================================

III. FROM KIM RICHMOND

Dear fellow L.A. Musicians,

A little more than one month from now we will be holding the
1st annual Santa Barbara Jazz Workshop, July 11 – 14, Tuesday
through Friday. This is an intimate jazz clinic, limited enrollment
assuring a more personal learning experience for instrumentalists
and vocalists.

I am co-director with vocalist Kimberly Ford (yes, the 2 Kims),
and this 4 day workshop will be held at the Marjorie Luke Theatre
and SOhO Jazz Club in lovely Santa Barbara. The performances at
the SOhO Wednesday, Thursday and Friday (late afternoons) are
open to the public. The Friday concert (6 PM) will feature the
student combos and the big band.

A faculty of 9 professional jazz performers will teach improvisation,
jazz repertoire and vocabulary, and the students will have opportunities
to play in combos and a big band.

The students are from high school age (21 or younger gets a discount)
to seniors and everything in between.

2017 FACULTY: 9 professional jazz musicians
Saxophone: Kim Richmond (Los Angeles)
Vocals: Kimberly Ford (Santa Barbara)
Trumpet: Jim Mooy (Santa Barbara)
Trombone: Scott Whitfield (Los Angeles)
Guitar: Tom Hynes (Los Angeles)
Piano: John Proulx (Los Angeles)
Bass: Chris Symer (Seattle)
Drums: David Bayles (Milwaukee)
Jon Nathan (Santa Barbara/Pasadena)

Please spread the word. Flyer attached. The website for the Santa
Barbara Jazz Workshop is
santabarbarajazzcamp.com

All the best,
KIM R

====================================

IV. EVENTS

 

DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

———————————

6/6/17

THE MALIBU FRIENDS OF MUSIC
and the
Montgomery Arts Housefor Music and Architecture
PRESENT

A SPECTACULAR SEASON FINALE CONCERT EVENT
at MAHMA

Click Below:
Take a moment to listen to the sonorous sounds of the
Malibu Coast Chamber Orchestra
under the baton of Scott Hosfeld.

Our own Maria Newman is the viola soloist.

Enjoy gelato & coffee and beautiful ocean views at 7:00pm
just prior to the concert

To make a reservation please call
(310) 589-0295
or make a reservation online at:

www.malibufriendsofmusic.org

Ticket/Donation for our Musical Soirees
is $25.00 per guest (Under 18 is Free)
Donation may be made online or at the door.

The Malibu Friends of Music is a non-profit organization
and operates solely on the generosity of your donations.

Artists, Programming and Dates are subject to change
and/or cancellation without prior notice.

—————————————————————————–

6/7/17

FREE ADMISSION GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS!

PRESS RELEASE/ Wed JUNE 7, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm at the Free Admission
GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS/ Richard Strauss Violin Sonata:

Violinist Jacqueline Suzuki
Pianist Brendan White.

Thank you!
Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Glendale Noon Concerts
818-249-5108

—————————————————————————–

6/10/17

EDENDALE UP CLOSE CONCERTS
in Echo Park, at the Edendale Branch Library (LAPL).

Fiato String Quartet) – Saturday JUNE 10, 2017 (Noon-1:00pm) performance

Complete info, including upcoming concerts through JAN 2018,
can be found at http://edendaleupclose.blogspot.com
Thank you!
Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Edendale Up Close Concerts
818-249-5108

—————————————————————————–

6/13/17

CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth Orchestra

Dear Friends & Colleagues:

You are cordially invited to attend the admission FREE concert given
by the CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth Orchestra
on Sunday, June 11, 2017 at 3PM at the historic San Gabriel Mission
Playhouse, 320 S Mission Drive, San Gabriel, CA 91776.

The orchestra is composed of young and talented students ages
12 through college age performing standard repertoire for orchestra
from Baroque to Contemporary periods. Students win their positions
in the orchestra through our annual competitive audition. The guest
soloist this concert will be the renowned violinist, Timothy Fain, who
was the recording artist on the sound track of the movie “The Black
Swan”. He will be performing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in
E minor accompanied by the orchestra.

Other works will include Wagner Tannhauser Overture, 2nd movement
of the Dvorak New World Symphony, Mozart Adagio and Rondo for
violin and orchestra(performed by our concertmaster, Jeongwon
Claire An), and the 1st movement of the Tchaikovsky Symphony No.4.

Looking forward to seeing every there..

Sincerely,
Fung Ho

—————————————————————————–

6/25/17

Dear Doctor Wu Fans,

We will be appearing at the Santa Monica Summer SOULstice Festival
on Sunday, June 25th 2017 from 4:30 to 6:30 PM, where we will play
two sets of your favorite Steely Dan tunes.  Please bring your friends
along and enjoy a great time with us!

Edgemar Courtyard
2440 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405
4:30 – 6:30 PM

We hope to see you there!

The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

PENSION / AFM-SAG-AFTRA FUND / EVENTS

May 27th, 2017

5/27/17
I. PENSION COMMENT
II. AFM & SAG-AFTRA Fund
III. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===========================================

I. PENSION COMMENT

FYI:
When our AFM Pension took its stock market dive in 2008,
You recall our L.A. / NY H&W Fund had similar financial woes.
A person in the H&W loop gave me the following info.

(This regards only H&W management, but we can imagine
a similar band of irresponsible folks who “might” have
been ignoring the location/vulnerability of our Pension
money during the stock market crash.

For instance, if those Pension Trustees had been paying
attention to the crisis, they could have switched us to safe
Blue Chip stocks before the worst of it.)

H&W Trustees at the time of the 2008 crash:

Lewis, Vince, exec at Disney, exec at Entertainment
Partners, Gary Hughes (“Management trustee,”) one
more un-named person.

Six total Trustees: 3 from the Union side and 3 from
the music business executive side.
Trustees are volunteers. They serve as a community service.
Trustees are not officially “Trustees” until they meet
together to make decisions.

No Union allows membership to contact Trustees directly.

Very sad.
Again, this is not a list of AFM Pension Trustees.
Then again, maybe some of them were…

=================================

II. AFM & SAG-AFTRA Fund in the Spotlight at ASCAP Expo

The little-known AFM & SAG-AFTRA Intellectual Property Rights
Distribution Fund pays royalties even to oft-neglected session musicians
and backup singers.

Stevie Wonder was the headliner — and closing act — of the ASCAP
I Create Music Expo that concluded this weekend, but musicians and
singers will be interested to know that an obscure fund, jointly run
by the American Federation of Musicians and performers’ union
SAG-AFTRA, also had a moment in the sun at the annual conference
for songwriters, composers, artists and producers.

If those two unions seem like an odd pairing, they aren’t: since its
2012 founding by way of merger, SAG-AFTRA, like AFTRA
before it, has represented recording artists — singers — as
well as actors and others, such as broadcasters.

The joint fund, the AFM & SAG-AFTRA Intellectual Property
Rights Distribution Fund, distributed about $60 million in royalties
in 2016 and thus will be welcome as anything but odd by those
who receive checks from it — a variety of singers and musicians,
including such non-featured performers as backup singers and
session musicians, who otherwise might not receive music
royalties at all.

Although that total is far less than the approximately $1 billion
in residuals that SAG-AFTRA distributes annually, and is also
less than the $90 million to $100 million in audiovisual AFM
residuals that are disbursed each year (which are administered
by yet another organization, the Film Musicians Secondary
Markets Fund), the checks can be significant, ranging up to
$1 million in some cases, said fund executive director Dennis
Dreith.

“We do for non-featured performers what SoundExchange
and AARC do for featured performers,” explained Dreith,
referencing two other music royalty organizations. He spoke
to The Hollywood Reporter after conducting a seminar Friday
for about 100 people at the Expo.

One recipient of a payment from the fund was so unaccustomed
to receiving royalties that she rang up Dreith and asked if she
was really allowed to cash the check. He assured her that she was.

Citing the case of a former Motown session bass player who he said
died impoverished after helping churn out hit after hit (“You Can’t
Hurry Love” by The Supremes, “My Girl” by The Temptations,
and dozens more), Dreith added that the fund helps ensure that
“there won’t be another James Jamerson,” at least in the economic sense.

Where the Money Comes From

Unlike Expo organizer ASCAP, which collects and pays royalties to
songwriters and composers, the joint union fund is for performers.
It was established in 1998, which may give a clue as to its initial
scope: the royalties are collected from U.S. digital platforms, but
not from U.S. terrestrial (conventional) radio, as to which there
is no provision in law for performance royalties. The Fair Play
Fair Pay Act, which the fund and unions vigorously support,
would change that and require AM and FM stations to pay
such royalties, too.

Those for-now digital royalties are paid to non-featured vocalists and
non-featured musicians regardless of their union membership or
affiliations. The fund collects foreign performance royalties for
U.S. non-featured performers as well, but only for members of
AFM and SAG-AFTRA.

That, anyway, is what the sound recording division of the fund
does. Two more recent arms, the symphonic royalties and
audiovisual divisions, represent evolutions beyond digital-only.
The first focuses on royalties for featured and non-featured
performers in symphonic sound recordings, including archival
recordings and radio broadcasts licensed for use on cable,
satellite and digital media. And the audiovisual division
collects royalties — again, for featured and non-featured
singers and musicians — from foreign territories for films
and television programs containing U.S. performers, which
have been broadcast on Spanish and German television,
and motion pictures containing U.S. performers, which have
been exhibited in cinemas in Spain.

There is no word on whether that limited geographic portfolio
might expand.

Like residuals, which inspired this reporter to prepare a
colored chart that Backstage likened to “a periodic table of
elements on mushrooms,” music royalties are complex: a
flowchart in the ninth edition of Harold Vogel’s definitive
Entertainment Industry Economics, which features almost
two-dozen circles, squares and other shapes and a similar
complement of connecting lines, looks like an oil refinery
diagram — except that the latter is easier to understand.
Indeed, turning bauxite into aluminum is apparently simpler
than the way money flows in the music business. But in one
small corner, at least, the AFM & SAG-AFTRA fund has it covered.

===================================

III. EVENTS

 

DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks

the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

—————————————————————————–

5/28 – 6/2/17
The BBB featuring Bernie Dresel

Mark your calendars and/or get tickets now:
playing TWO daytime shows near LAX (Los Angeles Airport)
this will be the only notice (earlier than usual) for these rare
“west side” shows

1.  LA Jazz Institute Big Band Spectacular
SUNDAY May 28 from 4:30-5:30 at Westin LAX Grand Ballroom
Call 562-200-5477 for $20 tickets or get them at the door.
http://lajazzinstitute.org

2.  LA Audio Show
FRIDAY June 2 from 5:30-7:00 at Sheraton Gateway LAX
poolside deck Single day tickets for the 10am-6pm LA
Audio Show and the 5:30 concert are available for $25
at http://www.laaudioshow.com/register

The deck area offers a variety of amenities from cabanas
to lounge seating and standing room where drinks,
appetizers and snacks can also be purchased. For those
whose preference is indoors, the windows of the
Costero Bar, overlooking the pool, will be opened.
And, for attendees, and others, who have worked up
an appetite for more solid fare, the Brasserie restaurant,
also with windows to the pool, will be serving.

—————————————————————————–

5/27/17
CULVER CITY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Music Director/Conductor Arlene Cardenes
Saturday May 27th, 5:00PM
A Culver City Centennial Celebration
This performance will feature a new
fanfare by Cary Belling.
Also
Andres Cardenes, Violinist and COnductor
Turning Point School Auditorium
8780 National Blvd. 
Culver City, CA 90232
Click here for ticket information

—————————————————————————–

6/7/17

FREE ADMISSION GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS!

PRESS RELEASE/ Wed JUNE 7, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm at the Free Admission
GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS/ Richard Strauss Violin Sonata:

Violinist Jacqueline Suzuki
Pianist Brendan White.

Thank you!
Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Glendale Noon Concerts
818-249-5108

—————————————————————————–

6/10/17

EDENDALE UP CLOSE CONCERTS
in Echo Park, at the Edendale Branch Library (LAPL).

Fiato String Quartet) – Saturday JUNE 10, 2017 (Noon-1:00pm) performance

Complete info, including upcoming concerts through JAN 2018,
can be found at http://edendaleupclose.blogspot.com
Thank you!
Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, Edendale Up Close Concerts
818-249-5108

—————————————————————————–

6/13/17

CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth Orchestra

Dear Friends & Colleagues:

You are cordially invited to attend the admission FREE concert given by the CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth Orchestra on Sunday, June 11, 2017 at 3PM at the historic San Gabriel Mission Playhouse, 320 S Mission Drive, San Gabriel, CA 91776.

The orchestra is composed of young and talented students ages 12 through college age performing standard repertoire for orchestra from Baroque to Contemporary periods. Students win their positions in the orchestra through our annual competitive audition. The guest soloist this concert will be the renowned violinist, Timothy Fain, who was the recording artist on the sound track of the movie “The Black Swan”. He will be performing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E minor accompanied by the orchestra.

Other works will include Wagner Tannhauser Overture, 2nd movement of the Dvorak New World Symphony, Mozart Adagio and Rondo for violin and orchestra(performed by our concertmaster, Jeongwon Claire An), and the 1st movement of the Tchaikovsky Symphony No.4.

Looking forward to seeing every there..

Sincerely,
Fung Ho

—————————————————————————–

6/25/17

Dear Doctor Wu Fans,

We will be appearing at the Santa Monica Summer SOULstice Festival on Sunday, June 25th 2017 from 4:30 to 6:30 PM, where we will play two sets of your favorite Steely Dan tunes.  Please bring your friends along and enjoy a great time with us!

Edgemar Courtyard
2440 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405
4:30 – 6:30 PM

We hope to see you there!

The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

PENSION WEBSITE / SITE INFO / COMMENT / EVENTS

May 19th, 2017

5/19/17
I. IMPORTANT WEBSITE – PENSION
II. SOME INFO FROM THE SITE
III. COMMENT
IV. EVENTS
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===========================================

I. IMPORTANT WEBSITE – PENSION

We received this information from a reliable source.

You need to follow this!:

Hi everyone,

As you all know we have a major problem with the AFM

pension fund. It is actually far worse than we have been

told by the trusties.

A number of very smart dedicated people in the NYC

area have started a committee to address this problem.

They have created a website to inform you of the ACTUAL

situations happening and the timeline in which they have

happened. They have been involving billion dollar multi –

employer hedge fund experts to advise them on some of

these points.

Please read the following website and sign up.

https://www.musiciansforpensionsecurity.com

 

A couple of the group members would like to come

out and address you about this in the next month

or so. I will be working with a couple of people from

SoCal to try and set this up. I will also be attending

the NY meetings as often as possible.

We ALL have to get involved to fix this.

PLEASE SEND THIS TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW

THAT IS INVOLVED WITH THE FUND!

=================================

II. SOME INFO FROM THE ABOVE SITE

Among other valuable info, you’ll find this on the

PENSION SECURITY SITE

As you may have heard, our hard-earned pension benefits
could be slashed to a negligible monthly payout once we
retire. Our Fund Trustees say this is due to a series of
unfortunate events, but it seems more and more clear
that the true unfortunate event is that they are
responsible for a decade of poor performance, and have
been less than transparent about the health of the Fund.

It’s true that in 2008 we incurred catastrophic losses to
our pension fund. That was a terrible year in the market
for all, and during that crash almost every multiemployer
fund suffered substantial losses. But our pension fund
performed much worse … AFM-EPF lost nearly 40%
(AFM website)  of assets spanning the 18 months
surrounding the crash, while other funds suffered an
average of 25%. After that difficult period, the
majority of multiemployer pension funds bounced
back, and 60% of those plans were back in the Green
Zone by 2011 (PBGC). Not ours, however. The AFM-EPF
fund continued to underperform every single year.

Let’s talk numbers here for a minute…
Over the past decade, our fund yielded a 3.2%
net average return. That’s 1.0% below our
already low custom benchmarks (estimated
returns on investments which are calculated
by Trustees and Fund Administration) and
drastically below the industry-wide yield of
6.8% (according to Pension and Investments
magazine). Compared to our peers, we are
underperforming.

Our pension administration spent over $248
million dollars in administrative expenses
and investment fees over the past decade,
while returning only 3.2% (5500s). Last year,
for example, the Fund admitted to losing $10
million in value (AFM-EPF website), but paid
$25 million in administrative costs and
investment fees. Additionally, our Fund’s expenses
have been unnecessarily exorbitant for years.
We spend $190K/month on rent in one of the
most expensive real estate markets in the country,
pay excessively high salaries to Fund administration,
high fees to investment managers (5500s), and
are unnecessarily overstaffed, in comparison to
similar funds. Not only are we paying employees
high salaries, but we are giving them raises almost
every year in the past decade. We are rewarding t
hem for bad performance.

We spent a lot of money to lose money.

We can make a comparative analysis to a peer
pension fund, AFTRA Retirement Fund. AFTRA is
similar to AFM-EPF in size, value of assets, and
personnel (for example, the consultant, accountant,
lawyers, and investment managers are all the same
professionals).  Although we utilize many of the
same resources, AFTRA is under-spending us
dramatically.  Using Form 5500s for the years
available to us, 2009-2014, we created a comparative
fee and expense analysis between AFTRA Retirement
Fund and AFM-EPF. For those six years, AFTRA paid
$103 million in investment fees and administrative
costs, while AFM-EPF paid $153 million in fees and
expenses. The AFM-EPF paid an extra 50 plus million
dollars in fees and expenses more than AFTRA paid
for the same six year period. Despite the fact that
these 2 funds are so similar in size and personnel,
the AFM-EPF paid a third more in expenses and
fees than AFTRA for 2009-2014.

“The Fund will be solvent until 2047.”

Many AFM members didn’t know just how bad things
were with the pension fund until they received a
December 2016 letter  from the trustees saying
that the fund in 2016 spent 25 million dollars in
fees/expenses and lost 11 million dollars for the
year to date. In addition the trustees in that same
letter made it very clear that the fund is in trouble
and could quite possibly be in critical and declining
status in the near future, as soon as this summer.

In this same letter, the trustees let us know that if
we are in critical and declining status that the new
pension law “MPRA” would apply to our fund.  “MPRA”
is a law that allows trustees to cut existing benefits
and gives workers little to no say in the process.

What is hard to explain is the following articles written
in 2015 by AFM trustees and officials just one year
before we received the bad news in that now famous
December 2016 letter about possible benefit cuts
through the new pension law “MPRA.   These articles
all make it seem like the new pension law “MPRA”
doesn’t apply to our fund and we should not be
worried because our fund is projected to be
solvent all the way till 2047.

So what changed in that one year?  Why are the same
trustees just one year later telling us that the new pension
law which allows trustees to make cuts to benefits
could easily apply to our fund now all of the sudden?

We deserve an answer.

AFM President and co-Chair Trustee, Ray Hair, said in
International Musician in January 2015, “the AFM-EPF…
is not projected to become insolvent, and the new law
[MPRA] does not authorize benefit reductions to the AFM-EPF.”

A month later, Local 802 President Tino Gagliardi wrote
In Allegro, “The new spending bill from Congress … includes
a provision that applies to deeply-troubled pension plans
that are near insolvency. As we have stated before … our
pension fund is projected to be solvent until at least 2047,
which is the longest period for which the actuaries have
made projections.”

In the same publication, Local 802’s lawyer Harvey Mars
also stated the fund would be solvent through 2047
and members should “rest secure”.

Tino Gagliardi then agreed with a statement given by
four Union Trustees — Laura Ross, Brian Rood, Bill
Moriarity and Phil Yao — stating again that they believe
the fund with be “solvent through at least 2047”.

UNDERPERFORMANCE AND HIGH EXPENSES

Christopher Brockmeyer, Co-Chair of the AFM-EPF, is
also the Director of Employee Benefit Funds for The
Broadway League. He was actively involved with the
development and passage of MPRA. In Markets Media
in 2014, he said, “I spend a lot more time on investment
issues … than do a lot of the other trustees.” He went
on to say, “Every fund … is primarily motivated by
trying to get its best return, which is typically 7.5%.”
It’s troubling that Brockmeyer, a Trustee of 11 pension
plans in the entertainment industry, and AFM-EPF
Trustee since 2007, believes our return should be
much higher than our 3.2%.  Where is the accountability
for the Fund’s poor performance, after Brockmeyer
claims to be the authority on “investment issues”? And
when our investment performance is failing, shouldn’t Mr.
Brockmeyer and other Trustees, including Co-Chair Ray
Hair, attempt to cut costs?

In 2009, Kilkelly’s salary jumped from $284K to $356K.

The Trustees vote each year on potential salary increases.
Our Fund Administrator and Executive Director, Maureen
Kilkelly, is now paid $422K a year (5500s). Kilkelly has
gotten a raise every year during the past decade, despite
the Fund’s poor performance. To add insult to injury,
in 2009, the year that New York’s Broadway musicians
took a salary freeze, Maureen Kilkelly received a 25.1%
raise. Why did the Trustees vote to raise Ms.Kilkelly’s
salary every year, regardless of the Fund’s performance?

Where is the accountability?

Has the Board of Trustees breached their fiduciary duties
by allowing for excessive fees, poor returns and little to
no transparency for many years?  Our current trustees
seem incapable of or unwilling to rein in exorbitant
costs. Why, after a decade of poor performance, has
there been no change from the Fund’s leadership?

The Trustees must explain the mistakes with full
transparency, improve the administrative performance,
and drastically reduce the high overhead.

===================================

III. COMMENT

Well Hooray for you. You hate my beloved AFM Local 47.
How satisfying this must be to you and your vaunted
“Committee” giggle~ giggle.

[EC: Did it every occur to you, that when the pensions
are slashed to a fraction of what you expected because
of the RMA leadership’s greed over the years (Plus a
touch of technology), and their refusal to talk buyouts,
reducing our membership numbers, dues, pension
and health and welfare, (More taking out than putting
in) with the work going everywhere but here, YOU
are going to be f***ed?

This committee has been trying to SAVE this union
from their damage, whether you realize it or not.

At least direct your anger where it belongs,… those who

caused this situation.

===================================

IV. EVENTS

DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks

the first 
Friday of 
every month.

7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

—————————————————————————–

5/20-21/17

CENTER STAGE OPERA PRESENTS
The Best of Broadway Volume III
Performing Arts Center (on the campus of Reseda High School)
Reseda, CA

May 20th – 7:30 PM
May 21st – 3:00 PM

Music from
Camelot, Cabaret, Guys and Dolls, A Chorus Line,
Snoopy the Musical, Company, Sweet Smell of success,
Miss Saigon, Woman of the Year, Avenue Q, The Wiz, 70 Girls 70
and Annie

Featuring
Nick Navarra
Stephanie Fredericks
Kate Bass
Dylan F. Thomas

—————————————————————————–

5/21/17

SONG OF THE ANGELS FLUTE ORCHESTRA
Founder, Frederick Staff
Music Director, Charles Fernandez

JAZZY FLUTES!

Sunday, May 21st 7pm at the
First Lutheran Church in Torrance

Guest artists
Ali Ryerson
David Shostac
Fred Seldon
and Billy Kerr

for tickets go here:

Concert Tickets

—————————————————————————–

5/28 – 6/2/17
The BBB featuring Bernie Dresel

Mark your calendars and/or get tickets now:
playing TWO daytime shows near LAX (Los Angeles Airport)
this will be the only notice (earlier than usual) for these rare
“west side” shows

1.  LA Jazz Institute Big Band Spectacular
SUNDAY May 28 from 4:30-5:30 at Westin LAX Grand Ballroom
Call 562-200-5477 for $20 tickets or get them at the door.
http://lajazzinstitute.org

2.  LA Audio Show
FRIDAY June 2 from 5:30-7:00 at Sheraton Gateway LAX
poolside deck Single day tickets for the 10am-6pm LA
Audio Show and the 5:30 concert are available for $25
at http://www.laaudioshow.com/register

The deck area offers a variety of amenities from cabanas
to lounge seating and standing room where drinks,
appetizers and snacks can also be purchased. For those
whose preference is indoors, the windows of the
Costero Bar, overlooking the pool, will be opened.
And, for attendees, and others, who have worked up
an appetite for more solid fare, the Brasserie restaurant,
also with windows to the pool, will be serving.

——————-

6/21/17
DON’T MISS
THE PHIL NORMAN TENTET
in West Los Angeles
Sunday, May 21st @ 2:30pm
(doors open at 2pm)
Contrapuntal Hall in Brentwood
655 N. Bundy Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90049

For Tickets:
http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2951454
limited seating; please reserve early

Hear the Performance of
“THEN  AND  NOW”

Remembering the classic sounds & variations of
12 jazz legends to include:

The George Shearing Quintet
The Dave Brubeck Quartet
The Modern Jazz Quartet
The Cal Tjader Quintet
the Ahmad Jamal Trio
Miles, Dizzy and more

—————————————————————————–

5/24/17

TALL AND SMALL

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017 8 pm – 10 pm

featuring:
Pete Christlieb & Linda Small
Pete Christlieb tenor sax; Linda Small trombone
saxophones Tracy Knoop, Travis Ranney,
Jeff Kashiwa, Bill Ramsay
trumpets Mike Mines, Jared Hall
piano: David Joyner
bass Clipper Anderson
drums Tim Malland

Cover Charge: $5
B SHARP COFFEE HOUSE
706 Opera Alley
Tacoma, WA 98402
Directions

—————————————————————————–

5/27/17
CULVER CITY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Music Director/Conductor Arlene Cardenes
Saturday May 27th, 5:00PM
A Culver City Centennial Celebration
This performance will feature a new
fanfare by Cary Belling.
Also
Andres Cardenes, Violinist and COnductor
Turning Point School Auditorium
8780 National Blvd. 
Culver City, CA 90232
Click here for ticket information

—————————————————————————–

6/13/17

CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth Orchestra

Dear Friends & Colleagues:

You are cordially invited to attend the admission FREE concert given by the CalStateLA Symphony Orchestra/Olympia Youth Orchestra on Sunday, June 11, 2017 at 3PM at the historic San Gabriel Mission Playhouse, 320 S Mission Drive, San Gabriel, CA 91776.

The orchestra is composed of young and talented students ages 12 through college age performing standard repertoire for orchestra from Baroque to Contemporary periods. Students win their positions in the orchestra through our annual competitive audition. The guest soloist this concert will be the renowned violinist, Timothy Fain, who was the recording artist on the sound track of the movie “The Black Swan”. He will be performing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E minor accompanied by the orchestra.

Other works will include Wagner Tannhauser Overture, 2nd movement of the Dvorak New World Symphony, Mozart Adagio and Rondo for violin and orchestra(performed by our concertmaster, Jeongwon Claire An), and the 1st movement of the Tchaikovsky Symphony No.4.

Looking forward to seeing every there..

Sincerely,
Fung Ho

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

GEORGE S. CLINTON MASTERCLASS / EVENTS

May 12th, 2017

5/12/17
I. GEORGE S. CLINTON MASTERCLASS!
II. EVENTS
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===========================================

I. ASMAC PRESENTS GEORGE S. CLINTON!

5/13/17

ASMAC presents

A MASTER CLASS WITH GEORGE S. CLINTON
MODERATED BY:  Sylvester Rivers
Valley College – Music Building
5800 Fulton Ave., Valley Glen, CA
Corner of Fulton & Oxnard  

Saturday, May 13, 2017
10:30 am –  CHECK-IN – Coffee/Refreshments
11:00 am – 2:00 pm – Master Class

“Scoring Comedies: Comedy is Serious Business
– The Scoring Art & Technique.”

Join us for an informative – and entertaining – Master Class.

Mr. Clinton is an award winning composer who has
scored over 100 films, most notably “Austin Powers
International Man of Mystery” and it’s blockbuster
sequels;  Disney’s hit “Santa Clause” sequels;
“Mortal Kombat” 1 & 2;  “Wild Things”,  “Red Shoe
Diaries”,  John Water’s “A Dirty Shame”  and the
Emmy Award winning “Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee.”

He began his professional musical career as a
singer/songwriter/arranger in Nashville while
earning degrees in music and drama. Upon
moving to LA, he became a staff songwriter
for Warner Brothers Music with songs recorded
by the likes of Michael Jackson and Joe Cocker
and continued working as a session musician
and arranger. It was the music from Clinton’s
solo album  “The George Clinton Band Arrives”
that attracted the attention of Cheech and Chong,
giving him the chance to score his first film “Still Smokin”.

In addition, Mr. Clinton is an advisor at the
Sundance Composers Lab, serves on the Music
Executive Branch of The Academy of Motion
Picture Arts and Sciences (The Oscars), is on
the boards of the Society of Composers and
Lyricists and the Alliance for Women Film
Composers, is a member of ASMAC and the
Television Academy, and was Chair of Film
Scoring at the Berklee College of Music 2012-2015.

Awards include a Platinum record for his score
to Mortal Kombat, Grammy and Emmy nominations,
the SCL Ambassador Award, the Spirit of Tennessee
Award, and nine BMI Film Music Awards, including
their highest honor, the BMI Icon Award.

MODERATED BY:  SYLVESTER RIVERS
Composer, arranger and pianist Sylvester Rivers
has recorded with numerous hit artists including
Lionel Richie, Diana Ross, The Jacksons, Sammy
Davis Jr., Dionne Warwick, Nancy Wilson, Kenny
Rogers, Johnny Mathis, Aretha Franklin, New
Edition, Smokey Robinson, The Temptations,
Gladys Knight & The Pips, Barry White, Marc
Bolan & T Rex, Ray Parker, Jr. & Raydio, Deniece
Williams, The Fifth Dimension and many others.

Rivers has composed, arranged and orchestrated
for television and film as well, such as the television
series “Fame,” songs for the Kevin Bacon/Laurence
Fishburne film “Quicksilver,” “Breakin’ 2: Electric
Boogaloo,” “The Arsenio Hall Show” and numerous
others; and  has been prolific in producing music
throughout a wide spectrum.

Valley College – Music Building

Sat., May 13, 2017
11:00 am – 2:00 pm
(Check-in & Refreshments – 10:30am )
Free parking in lot on corner of Fulton and Oxnard.
ASMAC Members and Students – $25
Non-Members – $40

=================================

I. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

—————————————————————————–

5/13/17

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY SYMPHONY

Saturday, May 13th, 2017
AGOURA HILLS/CALABASAS COMMUNITY CENTER
8:00 pm
27040 MALIBU HILLS RD
CALABASAS, CA
Price: $25
Saint-Saens: Bacchanale from “Samson and Delilah”
Tchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet Fantasy-Overture
TWO PREMIERES!
Tuttle: By Steam or By Dream Overture 
Inaugural Performance
Egizi: Orchestral Suite “In memoria di mio Padre”
Inaugural Performance
To purchase tickets for this concert, click here.
For information on the pre-concert dinner, click here.
(Program subject to change

—————————————————————————–

5/14/17

LOS ANGELES SYMPHONIC WINDS
Sunday, May 14th, 2017 – 2:30 pm
Calabasas Performing Arts Education Center
22855 Mulholland Hwy, Calabasas, CA 91302

Extraordinary Women – A Mother’s Day Concert to Remember
The LA Winds pay tribute to remarkable women who helped
shape the course of human history. Featured works will
include Giuseppi Verdi’s stirring “Overture to Joan of Arc”,
Mark Camphouse’s powerful “A Movement for Rosa”,
and Eric Coates’ regal “The Three Elizabeths”.

For tickets contact:
Mary Gallegos at mgallegos2@aol.com

—————————————————————————–

5/17/17

FREE ADMISSION GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS

On Wednesday  May 17, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
the Calico Winds performing duos and trios by
Heitor Villa-Lobos, Malcolm Arnolf and Joseph Canteloube
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

HEITOR VILLA-LOBOS Bachianas Brasileiras No. 6 for Flute & Bassoon
MALCOLM ARNOLD Divertimento for Flute, Oboe and Clarinet
JOSEPH CANTELOUBE Rustiques for Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon
Theresa Treuenfels (bassoon)
Rachel Berry (horn)
Ted Sugata ( oboe)
Kathryn Nevin (clarinet)
Eileen Holt (flute)

—————————————————————————–

5/20-21/17

CENTER STAGE OPERA PRESENTS
The Best of Broadway Volume III
Performing Arts Center (on the campus of Reseda High School)
Reseda, CA

May 20th – 7:30 PM
May 21st – 3:00 PM

Music from
Camelot, Cabaret, Guys and Dolls, A Chorus Line,
Snoopy the Musical, Company, Sweet Smell of success,
Miss Saigon, Woman of the Year, Avenue Q, The Wiz, 70 Girls 70
and Annie

Featuring
Nick Navarra
Stephanie Fredericks
Kate Bass
Dylan F. Thomas

—————————————————————————–

5/21/17

SONG OF THE ANGELS FLUTE ORCHESTRA
Founder, Frederick Staff
Music Director, Charles Fernandez

JAZZY FLUTES!

Sunday, May 21st 7pm at the
First Lutheran Church in Torrance

Guest artists
Ali Ryerson
David Shostac
Fred Seldon
and Billy Kerr

for tickets go here:

Concert Tickets

—————————————————————————–

5/27/17
CULVER CITY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Music Director/Conductor Arlene Cardenes
Saturday May 27th, 5:00PM
A Culver City Centennial Celebration
This performance will feature a new
fanfare by Cary Belling.
Also
Andres Cardenes, Violinist and COnductor
Turning Point School Auditorium
8780 National Blvd. 
Culver City, CA 90232
Click here for ticket information

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

AFM-SAG-AFTRA FUND / ASA EVENT / COMMENTS / EVENTS

May 4th, 2017

5/4/17

I. AFM & SAG-AFTRA Fund
II. ACADEMY OF SCORING ARTS

II. ACADEMY OF SCORING ARTS EVENT

III. MEMBER COMMENTS

V. EVENTS

 
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer

…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician

…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
 

…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

============================================

I. AFM & SAG-AFTRA Fund in the Spotlight at ASCAP Expo
from the Hollywood Reporter

by Jonathan Handel

The little-known AFM & SAG-AFTRA Intellectual Property
Rights Distribution Fund pays royalties even to oft-neglected
session musicians and backup singers. Stevie Wonder was
the headliner — and closing act — of the ASCAP I Create
Music Expo that concluded this weekend, but musicians
and singers will be interested to know that an obscure
fund, jointly run by the American Federation of Musicians
and performers’ union SAG-AFTRA, also had a moment
in the sun at the annual conference for songwriters,
composers, artists and producers.

If those two unions seem like an odd pairing, they aren’t:
since its 2012 founding by way of merger, SAG-AFTRA,
like AFTRA before it, has represented recording artists
— singers — as well as actors and others, such as
broadcasters.
The joint fund, the AFM & SAG-AFTRA Intellectual Property
Rights Distribution Fund, distributed about $60 million
in royalties in 2016 and thus will be welcome as anything
but odd by those who receive checks from it — a variety
of singers and musicians, including such non-featured
performers as backup singers and session musicians,
who otherwise might not receive music royalties at all.

Although that total is far less than the approximately
$1 billion in residuals that SAG-AFTRA distributes annually,
and is also less than the $90 million to $100 million in
audiovisual AFM residuals that are disbursed each year
(which are administered by yet another organization,
the Film Musicians Secondary Markets Fund), the
checks can be significant, ranging up to $1 million
in some cases, said fund executive director Dennis Dreith.

“We do for non-featured performers what SoundExchange
and AARC do for featured performers,” explained Dreith,
referencing two other music royalty organizations. He
spoke to The Hollywood Reporter after conducting a
seminar Friday for about 100 people at the Expo.

One recipient of a payment from the fund was so
unaccustomed to receiving royalties that she rang
up Dreith and asked if she was really allowed to
cash the check. He assured her that she was.

Citing the case of a former Motown session bass
player who he said died impoverished after helping
churn out hit after hit (“You Can’t Hurry Love” by
The Supremes, “My Girl” by The Temptations, and
dozens more), Dreith added that the fund helps
ensure that “there won’t be another James Jamerson,”
at least in the economic sense.

Where the Money Comes From

Unlike Expo organizer ASCAP, which collects and pays
royalties to songwriters and composers, the joint union
fund is for performers. It was established in 1998, which
may give a clue as to its initial scope: the royalties are
collected from U.S. digital platforms, but not from U.S.
terrestrial (conventional) radio, as to which there is no
provision in law for performance royalties. The Fair Play
Fair Pay Act, which the fund and unions vigorously
support, would change that and require AM and FM
stations to pay such royalties, too.

Those for-now digital royalties are paid to non-featured
vocalists and non-featured musicians regardless of their
union membership or affiliations. The fund collects
foreign performance royalties for U.S. non-featured
performers as well, but only for members of AFM and
SAG-AFTRA.

That, anyway, is what the sound recording division of
the fund does. Two more recent arms, the symphonic
royalties and audiovisual divisions, represent evolutions
beyond digital-only. The first focuses on royalties for
featured and non-featured performers in symphonic
sound recordings, including archival recordings
and radio broadcasts licensed for use on cable,
satellite and digital media. And the audiovisual
division collects royalties — again, for featured
and non-featured singers and musicians — from
foreign territories for films and television programs
containing U.S. performers ,which have been
broadcast on Spanish and German television, and
motion pictures containing U.S. performers, which
have been exhibited in cinemas in Spain.
There is no word on whether that limited geographic
portfolio might expand.

Like residuals, which inspired this reporter to prepare
a colored chart that Backstage likened to “a periodic
table of elements on mushrooms,” music royalties are
complex: a flowchart in the ninth edition of Harold
Vogel’s definitive Entertainment Industry Economics,
which features almost two-dozen circles, squares and
other shapes and a similar complement of connecting
lines, looks like an oil refinery diagram — except that
the latter is easier to understand. Indeed, turning
bauxite into aluminum is apparently simpler than the
way money flows in the music business. But in one
small corner, at least, the AFM & SAG-AFTRA
fund has it covered.

============================================

II. ACADEMY OF SCORING ARTS:

Scott Healy’s Ellington Group
With Special Guest Brent Fischer!
Saturday, May 6th, 2017
10am – 12:30pm
E-Spot Lounge Above Vitello’s
4349 Tujunga Ave, Studio City, CA 91604

You asked, we answered! We’ve enjoyed partnering
with Scott Healy to bring you Ellington, the high level
jazz study group. Now, we’ve added even more value
to our session by adding a guest interview segment.
Our Saturday session will feature special guest Brent
Fischer. Brent is the son of the late, great composer
and pianist Clare Fischer, who was one of our most
prolific and innovative jazz composers and performers.
Brent is a fantastic composer and multi-instrumentalist
in his own right. While he collaborated frequently with
his dad, he also developed his own unique musical
voice as a composer and performer.

We are now handling our ticketing through Eventbrite.
Be sure to get yours online! Ticket prices will be higher
at the door.

Scott Healy will continue the exploration of harmonic
rhythm, focusing on how jazz players and composers
use chord movement. This topic comprises much more
than just cool chord substitution and complicated
altered harmony. Harmonic rhythm defines phrases,
form and pacing, and your heightened awareness of
the flow of harmony will direct and focus the emotional
content of your writing. We will refer to examples from
Ellington/Strayhorn and Bob Brookmeyer.

Then after a break we’ll introduce our special guest,
Brent Fischer. Brent will present some of Clare’s harmonic
and orchestration concepts, and talk about how he’s
carrying on his dad’s legacy. This is deep stuff, so
bring your analog or digital notation aids and put
on your thinking caps! We will have a few handouts,
and also project all of the scores and examples.
They will also be available online for your laptops
or tablets.

Please go to http://ellingtonstudygroup.com
for more details, and we’ll see you there.

$15 pre-sale (deadline May 5), including light breakfast
$20 at the door

=================================

III. MEMBER COMMENTS

Dear Editor,

It is GREAT that there were so many sincere friends and
colleagues of those honored able to attend the ceremony
on Monday night!

What is also telling is that the business of the Union was
of so little interest that they did not stick around for the
last quarterly meeting in our historic Vine Street home.

The disenfranchisement and manipulation of the
membership should be obvious.

No doubt the salaried leadership at 47 will be marching
on May 1st with full pay…the rank and file are encouraged
to volunteer?  The Union Officers, Directors and
employees pick up a check every Friday. Do you?

Longtime Member

———-

well – if they win (the lawsuit) it that would be great but
what’s the odds of us winning?

=================================

IV. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891
————————————-
LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

————————————–

5/5/17

DOCTOR WU PERFORMANCE

We’ll be doing one set starting promptly at 8:00 PM at the Saint
Francis de Sales Festival on Friday, May 5th:

Saint Francis de Sales School
13368 Valleyheart Drive
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

The Doctor Wu Band line up for this show will be:

Tony Egan: Lead Vocals
Leigh DeMarche: Vocals
Jodi Fodor: Vocals
Gil Ayan: Guitar
Steve Bias: Bass and Vocals
Jeff Dellisanti: Saxophones
Mark Harrison: Keyboards
Paul Salvo: Trumpet
Frank Villafranca: Saxophones
Jack Cook: Drums

Admission is free and we look forward to seeing you there!
The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

—————————————————————————–

5/6/17

KIM RICHMOND/CLAY JENKINS

HEY fellow L.A. Musicians,
This is my second notice about this coming
Saturday. My favorite jazz trumpet player will be
in town this next weekend: Clay Jenkins. We will
be playing together at the Desert Rose. Clay
doesn’t make it to L.A. very often what with his
teaching position at Eastman School of Music
in New York, so you should try to catch us
this weekend. Details below.

WHAT: Clay Jenkins and Kim Richmond at the
Desert Rose, with the Mark Z. Stevens Trio
WHERE: Desert Rose Restaurant & Saturday jazz
venue. 1700 N. Hillhurst Avenue, LOS FELIZ
VILLAGE, Los Angeles, CA 90027
WHEN: This coming Saturday, May 6, 7 to 11. 3 sets
WHO: Clay Jenkins, trumpet; Kim Richmond,
alto & soprano saxophones, Mark Z. Stevens,
drums; Lou Foresteri, keyboard; Harvey Newmark, bass.
PARKING: Valet parking available
FOOD: excellent cuisine
RESERVATIONS: Recommended (323) 666-1166.
Ask for inside seating. That’s where the band is.
if you’re planning to join us, it’s absolutely
necessary to make an “INSIDE SEATING RESERVATION”
by the Wednesday or Thursday immediately
proceeding the event.  If you wait until the last minute,
the room will probably be sold out.  If you make
your reservation early in the week, you’ll be in the
best area to hear the jazz.  (If your plans change,
you can always call and cancel.)

Hope to see you there.
All the best,
KIM R
My website address is:
www.kimrichmond.com

—————————————————————————–

5/13/17

ASMAC presents

A MASTER CLASS WITH GEORGE S. CLINTON
MODERATED BY:  Sylvester Rivers
Valley College – Music Building
5800 Fulton Ave., Valley Glen, CA
Corner of Fulton & Oxnard  

Saturday, May 13, 2017
10:30 am –  CHECK-IN – Coffee/Refreshments
11:00 am – 2:00 pm – Master Class

“Scoring Comedies: Comedy is Serious Business
– The Scoring Art & Technique.”

Join us for an informative – and entertaining – Master Class.

Mr. Clinton is an award winning composer who has
scored over 100 films, most notably “Austin Powers
International Man of Mystery” and it’s blockbuster
sequels;  Disney’s hit “Santa Clause” sequels;
“Mortal Kombat” 1 & 2;  “Wild Things”,  “Red Shoe
Diaries”,  John Water’s “A Dirty Shame”  and the
Emmy Award winning “Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee.”

He began his professional musical career as a
singer/songwriter/arranger in Nashville while
earning degrees in music and drama. Upon
moving to LA, he became a staff songwriter
for Warner Brothers Music with songs recorded
by the likes of Michael Jackson and Joe Cocker
and continued working as a session musician
and arranger. It was the music from Clinton’s
solo album  “The George Clinton Band Arrives”
that attracted the attention of Cheech and Chong,
giving him the chance to score his first film “Still Smokin”.

In addition, Mr. Clinton is an advisor at the
Sundance Composers Lab, serves on the Music
Executive Branch of The Academy of Motion
Picture Arts and Sciences (The Oscars), is on
the boards of the Society of Composers and
Lyricists and the Alliance for Women Film
Composers, is a member of ASMAC and the
Television Academy, and was Chair of Film
Scoring at the Berklee College of Music 2012-2015.

Awards include a Platinum record for his score
to Mortal Kombat, Grammy and Emmy nominations,
the SCL Ambassador Award, the Spirit of Tennessee
Award, and nine BMI Film Music Awards, including
their highest honor, the BMI Icon Award.

MODERATED BY:  SYLVESTER RIVERS
Composer, arranger and pianist Sylvester Rivers
has recorded with numerous hit artists including
Lionel Richie, Diana Ross, The Jacksons, Sammy
Davis Jr., Dionne Warwick, Nancy Wilson, Kenny
Rogers, Johnny Mathis, Aretha Franklin, New
Edition, Smokey Robinson, The Temptations,
Gladys Knight & The Pips, Barry White, Marc
Bolan & T Rex, Ray Parker, Jr. & Raydio, Deniece
Williams, The Fifth Dimension and many others.

Rivers has composed, arranged and orchestrated
for television and film as well, such as the television
series “Fame,” songs for the Kevin Bacon/Laurence
Fishburne film “Quicksilver,” “Breakin’ 2: Electric
Boogaloo,” “The Arsenio Hall Show” and numerous
others; and  has been prolific in producing music
throughout a wide spectrum.

Valley College – Music Building

Sat., May 13, 2017
11:00 am – 2:00 pm
(Check-in & Refreshments – 10:30am )
Free parking in lot on corner of Fulton and Oxnard.
ASMAC Members and Students – $25
Non-Members – $40

—————————————————————————–

5/13/17

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY SYMPHONY

Saturday, May 13th, 2017
AGOURA HILLS/CALABASAS COMMUNITY CENTER
8:00 pm
27040 MALIBU HILLS RD
CALABASAS, CA
Price: $25
Saint-Saens: Bacchanale from “Samson and Delilah”
Tchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet Fantasy-Overture
TWO PREMIERES!
Tuttle: By Steam or By Dream Overture 
Inaugural Performance
Egizi: Orchestral Suite “In memoria di mio Padre”
Inaugural Performance
To purchase tickets for this concert, click here.
For information on the pre-concert dinner, click here.
(Program subject to change

—————————————————————————–

5/14/17

LOS ANGELES SYMPHONIC WINDS
Sunday, May 14th, 2017 – 2:30 pm
Calabasas Performing Arts Education Center
22855 Mulholland Hwy, Calabasas, CA 91302

Extraordinary Women – A Mother’s Day Concert to Remember
The LA Winds pay tribute to remarkable women who helped
shape the course of human history. Featured works will
include Giuseppi Verdi’s stirring “Overture to Joan of Arc”,
Mark Camphouse’s powerful “A Movement for Rosa”,
and Eric Coates’ regal “The Three Elizabeths”.

For tickets contact:
Mary Gallegos at mgallegos2@aol.com

—————————————————————————–

5/17/7

FREE ADMISSION GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS

On Wednesday  May 17, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
the Calico Winds performing duos and trios by
Heitor Villa-Lobos, Malcolm Arnolf and Joseph Canteloube
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

HEITOR VILLA-LOBOS Bachianas Brasileiras No. 6 for Flute & Bassoon
MALCOLM ARNOLD Divertimento for Flute, Oboe and Clarinet
JOSEPH CANTELOUBE Rustiques for Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon
Theresa Treuenfels (bassoon)
Rachel Berry (horn)
Ted Sugata ( oboe)
Kathryn Nevin (clarinet)
Eileen Holt (flute)

—————————————————————————–

5/20-21/17

CENTER STAGE OPERA PRESENTS
The Best of Broadway Volume III
Performing Arts Center (on the campus of Reseda High School)
Reseda, CA

May 20th – 7:30 PM
May 21st – 3:00 PM

Music from
Camelot, Cabaret, Guys and Dolls, A Chorus Line,
Snoopy the Musical, Company, Sweet Smell of success,
Miss Saigon, Woman of the Year, Avenue Q, The Wiz, 70 Girls 70
and Annie

Featuring
Nick Navarra
Stephanie Fredericks
Kate Bass
Dylan F. Thomas

—————————————————————————–

5/21/17

SONG OF THE ANGELS FLUTE ORCHESTRA
Founder, Frederick Staff
Music Director, Charles Fernandez

JAZZY FLUTES!

Sunday, May 21st 7pm at the
First Lutheran Church in Torrance

Guest artists
Ali Ryerson
David Shostac
Fred Seldon
and Billy Kerr

for tickets go here:

Concert Tickets

—————————————————————————–

5/27/17
CULVER CITY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Music Director/Conductor Arlene Cardenes
Saturday May 27th, 5:00PM
A Culver City Centennial Celebration
This performance will feature a new
fanfare by Cary Belling.
Also
Andres Cardenes, Violinist and COnductor
Turning Point School Auditorium
8780 National Blvd. 
Culver City, CA 90232
Click here for ticket information

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

ANOTHER NON-MEETING / SUBMISSION / COMMENT / BASS CAMP / EVENTS

April 29th, 2017

4/29/17
I. ANOTHER NON-MEETING LAST MONDAY

II. MEMBER SUBMISSION
III. MEMBER COMMENT
IV. NORTH TEXAS DOUBLE BASS CAMP
V. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

============================================

I. ANOTHER NON-MEETING LAST MONDAY

It’s very telling that there were hundreds there Monday night for the
Lifetime Achievement Awards, but by the time they set up for
the meeting they couldn’t even make quorum. Only 43 stayed.

See the minutes below….

Many introductions – politicians – All Recording musician oriented.
When President Acosta explained what the awards were he mentioned recording musicians first, then orchestral and

copying folks..

Lots of shout outs to RMA friendly folks.

The five honored were:
Gene Cipriano – presented by Dan Higgins
Vincent DeRosa – presented by Annie Bosler
Louise DeTullio – presented by Gayle Levant
Carol Kaye – presented by Chuck Berghofer
and

Dick Nash presented by Alan Kaplan

Each presenter was presented by Rick Baptist.
And each recipient was given a trophy and
certificate from the city.

As you can tell, all the honorees were primarily
recording musicians. Were there no long term
LA Phil musicians they could have honored? The
local of course, knows where they think their
bread is buttered. All are certainly far more than
deserving, but how about someone who is not
an RMA Member.

—————

Didn’t get to actual meeting till 8:15

While the room was packed for the awards (hundreds),
how telling that no quorum was reached for
the meeting. Only 43 stayed.

Called the roll…

Seems a majority of those in attendance were
“Interested parties” In other words, those who
make money working for the union on the board
or in committees.

50 Year Pins given out:
John Scalo(SP?)
Rusty Higgins

Officer reports given –
President – Showed presentation.
Update on building transition – McCormick is
contractor. McCormick construction management.

PHASE I
Offices
Rehearsal rooms

PHASE II
Multipurpose room and main exterior

NEGOTIATIONS
LA Phil
LA Opera  Ratified
New West
Metro Community Orch Ratified
Greek
Tanikawa CBA Ratified
Musica Angelica
San Bernadino Sym in progress

Pasa Sym ongoing.
LA Jewish Sym
Perf Arts Center of LA “Dance at the Music Center”
Riverside Phil in progress
LA Master Chorale
Pasadena Playhouse

Grants and some other giving drying up, could be
a problem for smaller orchestras

TRENDS
2016 – 12,663 contracts (79 Million dollars in Wages) –
Slightly larger than last year.

Preached union vs. non-union.
Local wants to have rank and file help.  – Hopefully
the rank and file will help the union as much as the
union has helped the rank and file.

MAY DAY – May 1st – international workers day.
Worker  from the union spoke.
Some are working toward a ‘right to work’ situation.
May 1st there will be a March.
Wants members to come out on Monday to march.
MacArthur Park through Pershing Square to City Hall.
[EC: The irony was stifling. Our union has done more
to grow nonunion work than any other entity.]
Many talked in support to the March.

Back to the Pres.
Initiatives – Getting into the building
Discussion – SP562 – single payer health care.
If we can get it passed, it will reduce the problem
of health care in contracts.

Member spoke on SP562. Please help make calls!
Call your state senator to support this bill.

Planning  (5 year plan) will be presented in July.
Want to try to recapture members who’ve left.

VP REPORT
Will be honoring Lalo Schifrin
Concert Oct 7th at the Alex Theater.
Who’s paying for it? Music Fund of Los Angeles
(From the Local), Musicians at Play and Varese
Saraband.

Lots of nego… gives the Pres. praise.

In New York – Nego Live TV. Contract has been
around since 1954. Academy Awards Show –
Got musicians listed on the crawl.
Maybe the Golden Globes, Tonys etc. in the future.

LACC – Herb Alpert School – will be on career
technical advisory board.

SECRETARY REPORT –
2016 –
revenue  – $4,624,000+
cost – $4,543,000+
income $81,827 dollars

Membership drive is on right now.

DIRECTORY COMING OUT – Make sure they have
your most recent info.

We’re part of the Actor’s Fund and can call on
their services. If you know anyone have challenges,
please let them know that the Actor’s Fund is
there to help.

One thing to vote on, but no quorum, so it
was voted on by the board members.

Called Exec. Board Meeting. – no meeting quorum,
did have a board quorum.

Discussed the resolution:

[EC: In short the resolution was this. Currently the
Officers automatically get a COLA (Cost of Living
Increase) every year, though recently they have
foregone them because of the Local’s finances

This resolution would change it so they would only
get a COLA if the Local was in the green enough to
pay for the COLA’s cost TIMES 5.

In other words, if the cola would cost the Local, say
$5,000, the Local would have to make a profit of at least
$25,000 in profit (5 times the cost of the COLA.]

Salary Revue Board spoke in favor.
But wanted to amend it.
Originally, wanted to include board and committees
in COLA (cost of living increase calc. Legislative
committee said they should not do that. Should be
only for the titled officers, a formula to be used to
decide if they get a COLA (Cost of Living Adjustment).
If it shows that the local has been in positive territory
they get the cola, if not they don’t.

Election Board was given as an example – they make
a lot in election years, not much in others.

Remove Article V, Section VI

Much Discussion.

Who does the calculation?
Board member: Couldn’t do it last time because
of the quorum.

Member: Can the officers vote on it? Yes
Can send it to the membership by mail.

Board Member: Board member must recuse themselves
if they have a fiduciary interest.
Parliamentarian: No they don’t.

Motion to accept change was moved and seconded.
Board voted to accept the change.

Explanation:
Committee member: This is an attempt to MODERATE
the salaries by making the cola only be used if the
Local makes enough of a profit to offset the COLA.
(Times 5)

Committee member: Creates a minimum that must be
reached for the COLA to be used. Is a simple floor.

Legislative committee position: Formula was inconsistent
before.

Member asked: There are three months between meetings.
Why couldn’t this have been worked out in those three
months so we don’t have to sit through the minutiae in
a meeting?

Answer: Once the resolution is in print, it can only be
changed in a membership meeting.

Question called: Must vote on amendment first
Amendment restricted it to the titled officers… Passed by board
Now onto the resolution as amended – Passed

Meeting adjourned at 9:45PM

============================================

II. MEMBER SUBMISSION

Member: I believe the reason his title “Music Contractor” is why
he’s not an agent as he characterizes his job.

Also interesting point, at the end of article “embrace all
job opportunities not just the highest paying ones ” and
“We need to modernize without CANNIBALIZING”

Member comment:
I believe it is too late to prevent “CANNIBALIZING” He teamed
up with the other one who eat most everything.

The Man Behind Hollywood’s Top Musicians

FORBES – Apr 27, 2017 @ 07:00 AM

The world’s most famous film music composers are
as well respected as any other mainstream artists
today, and a number of them are even household
names. But the vehicle by which we come to know
and love these composers’ work is via a community
of world-class musicians who bring life to the musical
notes these composers have crafted on paper (or
more likely on a computer). These cellists, trombonists,
percussionists, vocalists, pianists and many more
have recorded the most famous and memorable
scores in history. But how do Hollywood’s top
composers secure the best musicians for their
projects?

Enter Peter Rotter and his company Encompass Music Partners.
Rotter is a music contractor and coordinator, which is
essentially a middleman, who’s been connecting the
harmonious dots since 1987. Having served as a music
consultant to Hollywood film score giants (John Williams,
Hans Zimmer, James Horner, James Newton Howard,
Alan Silvestri, Alexandre Desplat, Henry Jackman and
Brian Tyler, to name a few), it’s safe to say that he
works on more films than anyone else in the entire
music industry. Rotter says, “The fun part of my job
is being a musical casting agent. I basically become
part of the music, and provide the paint colors to the
composer’s canvas.” For example, for Hans Zimmer’s
score for Man of Steel, Rotter contracted ten of the
most renowned drummers on the earth, including
Pharrell Williams and Sheila E (known for performing
with Prince). Rotter also works with Grammy-nominated
Randy Kerber, who is one of the most respected pianists
in Hollywood history. In addition to performing on the
La La Land soundtrack, which Rotter worked on, Kerber
can be heard performing on John Williams’ iconic Harry
Potter theme, as well as songs for Michael Jackson.

Perhaps most unique and exciting to the film music
industry of late is Hans Zimmer’s live show, which
was trending on YouTube after his debut performance
at Coachella. Rotter is responsible for contracting
Zimmer’s string players and choral singers for every
West Coast performance, and the group is now on
tour across the globe.

Today Rotter works with over 60 composers who
specialize in scores across all mediums, including
film, television, video games, commercials, trailers,
records and various forms of new media. He says
that he has worked on over 1,000 film scores and
hundreds of episodes for television. The musicians
that he works with have spent as much or more
time studying as lawyers and doctors. They work
tirelessly to learn and maintain the craft of playing
their instruments. This dedication and hard work
translate into legendary performances that continue
to leave marks on the history of music.

The future of Rotter’s business is at the mercy of
the musician/performer unions and how they adapt
to the new age of content distribution. As more
content is created on new media, the landscape of
performance residuals and player union fees is still
being determined. This leaves challenges for
multiple sectors within the music industry:
performing artists, licensing, performing rights
organizations, film composers and music contractors.
Rotter’s philosophy is that “we need to modernize
without cannibalizing,” referring to the unions’
necessity to adjust to new business models. He
explains that to do this we have to embrace all job
opportunities, not just the highest-paying ones.
Meeting a project’s creative needs should be the
top priority, and introducing a range of budget
tiers will make the industry explode again. Rotter
concludes, “I want to create a legacy that builds
a bridge for the future of the music business.”

Jordan Passman is the Founder & CEO of
SCORE A SCORE, an LA-based company
focused on simplifying custom music and licensing.

=================================

III. MEMBER COMMENT

Local 47 AFM:

I was just visiting the Local 47 website and noticed the heading
of Musicians of Hollywood. There is far more to the jurisdiction
of Local 47 than just Hollywood (and by extension, Recording
Musicians.

For example, orchestral musicians in the Local’s jurisdiction also
have a standing in the world community but you wouldn’t know
looking at the Local 47 Website. No mention of the LA Phil,
LA Chamber Orchestra or LA Opera Orchestra. The LA Phil is
one of the five premiere orchestras of the world. It’s possible
that the LA Phil is producing more dues than the recording
musicians considering the loss of work. Yet they still solely
kiss the RMA Ring.

=================================

IV. NORTH TEXAS DOUBLE BASS CAMP

Early registration deadline is May 2nd for the North Texas
Double Bass Camps. We are filling up so SIGN UP NOW
before the price increases!

Click on the links below to sign up through our new
registration process.

The Bradetich Master Classes: June 20th-24th
For advanced high school and college-aged classical
students. The students receive 5 days of intense
musical training in all areas of bass playing –
orchestral, solo, and technique. Students also
participate in bass ensembles to enhance their
chamber music training.
https://app.getacceptd.com/bradetich

The Beginner and Intermediate Bass Camps:
June 22nd-24th  For any age level. This is a
fun camp, where students get to work closely
with superb bass teachers. Students focus on
advancing their technical facility and work in
a small group setting for lots of personal
attention.
https://app.getacceptd.com/bradetich

LICK HERE  for Camp Flyer

CLICK HERE to DONATE NOW to our bass
camp scholarship program.  If you have
questions or are interested in the camps,
please do not hesitate to e-mail or call
me direct. We are looking forward to seeing
all of you back at bass camp in June 🙂

Tammy Jo Leonard
Double Bass Camp Coordinator
tammy@bradetichfoundation.org
949-285-7522

North Texas Double Bass Camps at UNT

=================================

V. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

——————————————

4/30/17

FREE CONCERT for the Public

THE PHIL NORMAN TENTET
AT THE
Ascension Lutheron Church
Sunday April 30th @ 5pm
1600 E. Hillcrest Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA. 91362

No Reservations Needed

Remembering the classic sounds
& variations of 12 jazz legends
to include:

The George Shearing Quintet
The Dave Brubeck Quartet
The Modern Jazz Quartet
The Cal Tjader Quintet
the Ahmad Jamal Trio
Miles, Dizzy and more

——————————————

5/1/17 DEADLINE

NORTH/SOUTH CONSONANCE
2017 Call for Scores

All composers are eligible for consideration
Solo, chamber ensembles and chamber orchestra works
up to 18 performers will be considered

Vocalists, percussion and/or electronics are acceptable

One work will be selected for recording on the North/South
label

$30 (US Dlls) non-refundable fee per composition
submitted required

Online Submissions at
http://www.northsouthmusic.org/Score-Submissions

Complete submission guidelines at
http://www.northsouthmusic.org/Call-For-Scores

——————————————

5/3/17

Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts series
(concerts every first & third Wednesday at 12:10-12:40 pm)
are listed at http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you for your support in publicizing the Glendale
Noon Concerts!

Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, GNC
818 249 -5108

On Wednesday  May 3, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
pianist Charles Fierro performing Debussy Preludes
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

PROGRAM:
MAY 3, 2017
CHARLES FIERRO Piano Recital
DEBUSSY: SELECTED PRELUDES
The Dancers of Delphi
Sails
The Girl with the Flaxen Hair
What the West Wind Saw
The Engulfed Cathdral
The Interrupted Serenade
The Hills of Anacapri
Minstrels

————————————–

5/5/17

DOCTOR WU PERFORMANCE

We’ll be doing one set starting promptly at 8:00 PM at the Saint
Francis de Sales Festival on Friday, May 5th:

Saint Francis de Sales School
13368 Valleyheart Drive
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

The Doctor Wu Band line up for this show will be:

Tony Egan: Lead Vocals
Leigh DeMarche: Vocals
Jodi Fodor: Vocals
Gil Ayan: Guitar
Steve Bias: Bass and Vocals
Jeff Dellisanti: Saxophones
Mark Harrison: Keyboards
Paul Salvo: Trumpet
Frank Villafranca: Saxophones
Jack Cook: Drums

Admission is free and we look forward to seeing you there!
The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

DEADLINE HOLLYWOOD / SUIT AGAINST STUDIOS / LAWSUIT DETAILS / COMMENT / EVENTS

April 20th, 2017

4/20/17
I. DEADLINE: HOLLYWOOD ARTICLE

II. OUTSOURCING SUIT AGAINST STUDIOS
III. LAWSUIT AGAINST STUDIOS (DETAILS)
IV. MEMBER COMMENT
V. EVENTS
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===================================

I. DEADLINE: HOLLYWOOD ARTICLE

Saying that its contracts have been “put at serious risk” by
“work done in the shadows,” Local 47 of the American Federation
of Musicians is preparing to launch a campaign “to ensure that
musicians can earn a livable wage working in Los Angeles.”
Related
WGA Video Urges Yes Vote On Strike Authorization

AFM Local 47
In a recent communique with its members, the local’s executive
board said more and more musicians “are being asked to record
music for major, well-funded projects without union contracts.
If union contracts are made irrelevant by work done in the
shadows, the floor for pay will drop for both union and non-
union musicians.” Read the full message below.
In many cases, union musicians are forced to choose between
working nonunion or not working at all. “These employment
practices are especially divisive and pernicious,” the executive
board said, “because they exert enormous pressure on
individual union members.”

The local’s current contract with the major studios doesn’t
expire until next April, but it’s already gearing up for a
tough round of bargaining. One of the challenges it’s
facing is the trend toward using foreign orchestras to
score films and TV shows that were shot right here
in Los Angeles. Another problem is that the AFM’s
multibillion-dollar pension plan is in “critical” condition.

Related Warner Bros, MGM & Paramount Hit With Outsourcing
Suit By Musicians Union

“The actuary certified that for the plan years beginning
April 1, 2016, and 2015, respectively, the plan is in
‘critical’ status under the Pension Protection Act of 2006,”
according to the AFM Pension Plan’s latest financial
report. As such, the Plan’s board of trustees was
required by law to adopt a rehabilitation plan
designed to improve its financial health and to
allow it to emerge from critical status.

“We all know what it is like to wonder where your
next call is going to come from or how you are
going to pay your bills,” the executive board said.
“No single musician can stop the forces that
undermine our profession, but as a union we
have always been able to push back. We believe
that it is now necessary to take action together.”
[EC: See late weeks Blog for the full message text.]

============================================

II. OUTSOURCING SUIT AGAINST STUDIOS
Warner Bros, MGM & Paramount Hit With Outsourcing Suit By Musicians Union

by Dominic Patten

According to the American Federation of Musicians, the

songs did not remain the same — or at least in the places

they were supposed to be. The 80,000-member-strong

union slammed Warner Bros, Paramount Pictures and

MGM last week in federal court with a breach of contract

lawsuit over four features’ music scores, including the

Hans Zimmer score for Paramount’s Interstellar, which

was nominated for an Oscar this year. The AFM alleges

that the trio of studios broke a 2010 agreement to

ensure that the music for movies made in the U.S.

and Canada was made here too.

“The AFM brings this …action to remedy Defendants’

violations of their respective obligations to employ AFM

members under the terms of the collective bargaining

agreement in recording music in connection with the

production of theatrical motion pictures (referred to

as ‘scoring’) titled (1) Interstellar, (2) Journey 2:

The Mysterious Island, (3) Robocop, and (4) Carrie,

all of which were produced by one or more of the

Defendants in the United States or Canada,  but

were scored, in violation of the agreement,
outside the United States or Canada,” says the
11-page complaint (read it here) seeking a jury trial.
Intersteller, Robocop and Carrie were scored in the

UK, and Journey 2 was produced in Australia and

Papua New Guinea.

[EC: Notice the only commonality of all these actions? To
protect the RMA elites.]

============================================

III. LAWSUIT AGAINST STUDIOS (DETAILS)
LEWIS N. LEVY, Bar No. 105975
DANIEL R. BARTH, Bar No. 274009
Levy, Ford & Wallach
3619 Motor Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90034
Telephone: (213) 380

3140
Facsimile: (213) 480-3284
Email:
LLevy@lfwlawyers.com
DBarth@lfwlawyers.com
JEFFREY R. FREUND (pro hac vice application forthcoming)
ROBERT ALEXANDER (pro hac vice application forthcoming)
ABIGAIL V. CARTER (pro hac vice application forthcoming)
PHILIP C. ANDONIAN (applicationfor admission pending)
Bredhoff & Kaiser, PLLC
805 15th
Street N.W., Suite 100
Washington, D.C. 20005
Email: jfreund@bredhoff.com
ralexander@bredhoff.com
acarter@bredhoff.com
pandonian@bredhoff.com
Attorneys for Plaintiff
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF
MUSICIANS OF THE UNITED
STATES AND CANADA
Plaintiff v. WARNER BROTHERS
ENTERTAINMENT, INC., PARAMOUNT
PICTURES, INC., and METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
PICTURES, INC.
Defendants.
CASE NO. 2:15-CV-3069
COMPLAINT
JURY TRIAL DEMANDED
NATURE OF THE CASE

1. This is an action under §301 of the Labor Management
Relations Act (“LMRA”), 29 U.S.C
. § 185, for violations of a collective bargaining
agreement to which the Plaintiff American Federation
of Musicians of the United States and Canada
(hereinafter “AFM”) and the Defendants Warner Brothers
Entertainment, Inc. (hereinafter “Warner Brothers”),
Paramount Pictures

Corporation (hereinafter “Paramount”), and Metro
-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, Inc.
(hereinafter “MGM”) (collectively “Defendants”) are parties.
The AFM brings this § 301 action to remedy Defendants’
violations of their respective obligations
to employ AFM members under the terms of the
collective bargaining agreement in recording
music in connection with the production of
theatrical motion pictures (referred to as
“scoring”) titled
(1) Interstellar,
(2) Journey 2: The Mysterious Island,
(3) Robocop, and
(4) Carrie, all of which were produced by one
or more of the Defendants in the United
States or Canada, but were scored, in
violation of the agreement, outside the
United States or Canada. This action
seeks to recover appropriate breach of
contract damages, including but not limited
to musician wages payable pursuant to the
agreement, to compel Defendants to make the
contributions due under the agreement to
certain separate musician funds that are
maintained under that agreement for the
benefit of AFM musicians, and to obtain a
court declaration of the AFM’s and its
members’ rights and of the Defendants’
duties with respect to the collective
bargaining agreement in relation to each
Defendant’s violation of that agreement.
JURISDICTION AND VENUE

2. This Court has jurisdiction over this lawsuit
and parties pursuant to 29 U.S.C. § 185
and 28 U.S.C. § 1331.

3. Venue lies in this District pursuant to
29 U.S.C. § 185(a) and 28 U.S.C. § 1391(b).

PARTIES

4. The Plaintiff AFM is a labor organization
that represents approximately 80,000 professional
musicians in the United States and Canada, including
many hundreds of studio recording musicians who
work to score motion pictures produced in this
District and throughout the United States and Canada.

The AFM is “a labor organization representing
employees in an industry affecting commerce”
within the meaning of the federal statute,
29 U.S.C. § 185, authorizing “[s]uits for violation
of contracts” between such a labor organization
and “an employer.”

5. The Defendant Warner Brothers produces theatrical
motion pictures through its motion picture units,
including Warner Brothers Pictures and New Line
Cinema, and employs in the United States and
Canada professional musicians represented by
the AFM in their production. Warner Brothers
maintains its headquarters at 4000 Warner
Boulevard, Burbank, CA 91522, and engages in
business on a regular basis in the Central
District of California.

6. The Defendant Paramount produces theatrical
motion pictures and employs in the United States
and Canada professional musicians represented
by the AFM in their production. Paramount maintains
its headquarters at 5555 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles,
CA 90038, and engages in business on a regular
basis in the Central District of California.

7. The Defendant MGM produces theatrical motion pictures
and employs in the United States and Canada professional
musicians represented by the AFM in their production.
MGM maintains its headquarters at 245 N Beverly Drive,
Beverly Hills, CA 90210, and engages in business on
a regular basis in the Central District of California.

8. Each of the Defendants is “an employer” within
the meaning of the federal statute, 29 U.S.C. § 185,
authorizing “[s]uits for violation of contracts”
between such an employer and “a labor organization
representing employees in an industry affecting commerce.”

FACTS

9. At all times relevant to this lawsuit,
the AFM and each of the Defendants were
parties to a collective bargaining agreement,
titled “Basic Theatrical Motion Picture Agreement
of 2010” (hereinafter “Agreement”). The
Agreement is a contract between Defendants as
employers and the AFM as a labor organization
representing employee musicians within the
meaning of 29 U.S.C.

§185. Each of the Defendants is a
“Producer” as to certain theatrical
motion pictures within the terms of the
Agreement. When executed, the terms of
the Agreement were effective for the
period April 14, 2010 through February
23, 2013, and were subsequently extended
through April 4, 2015.

10. The Agreement set out wage and benefit
terms for various defined categories of AFM
members, including, inter alia, instrumental and
orchestral musicians who work to score theatrical
motion pictures (“Musicians”).

The Agreement governed all work by Musicians
“employed by the Producer in the State of California
or elsewhere in the United States and Canada and
whose services are rendered in connection with
the production of theatrical motions pictures.”
Services “rendered in connection with the production
of theatrical motion pictures” include, but are not
limited to, recording of music for use in
connection with the production, known as “scoring.”

11. The Agreement required that “[a]ll
theatrical motion pictures produced by
the Producer in the United States or
Canada, if scored, shall be scored
in the United States or Canada,” unless
excused by the AFM under circumstances
not present here.

12. With respect to a motion picture that
is required to be scored in the United
States or Canada under the terms of the
Agreement, Producers were required to
employ Musicians under the terms of the
Agreement, and were required, among
other things, to provide compensation in
accordance with the compensation terms
specified in the Agreement. A Producer’s
compensation obligations under the
Agreement include, but are not limited
to: (i) the obligation to make specified
minimum wage and other payments; (ii)
the obligation to make a specified level
of contributions to the American Federation
of Musicians and Employers’ Pension Fund,
and various health benefit funds; and (iii)
if appropriate, make contributions to the
Film Musicians Secondary Markets Fund
for the benefit of Musicians.

13. When a motion picture is required to
be scored pursuant to the terms of the
Agreement in the United States or Canada,
and when Producers employed Musicians
pursuant to the terms of the Agreement to
perform work covered by the Agreement,
each Musician’s total hours of service and
total wages paid for covered work must be
reported to the AFM. The reporting process
includes, but is not limited to, submitting
standardized documents known as “B forms,”
which records the work performed by the
Musicians, their wages, and their benefits
contributions.

14. During the term of the Agreement, including
its extension, the following were among the
theatrical motion pictures produced in the
United States and/or Canada by one or more
of the Defendants:
(1) Interstellar;
(2) Journey 2: The Mysterious Island;
(3) Robocop; and
(4) Carrie
(collectively “the Pictures”).

15. Warner Brothers was a Producer subject
to the terms of the Agreement regarding
the motion pictures Interstellar and Journey 2:
The Mysterious Island; MGM was a Producer
subject to the terms of the Agreement regarding
the motion pictures Robocop and Carrie; and
Paramount was a Producer subject to the terms
of the Agreement regarding Interstellar and Robocop.

16. Each of the Pictures was scored under the
meaning of the Agreement.

17. Each of the Pictures was scored outside of the
United States or Canada in violation of the Agreement.
On information and belief, Interstellar, Carrie, and
Robocop were each scored in Great Britain, and
Journey 2: The Mysterious Island was scored in
Papau New Guinea and Australia.

18. The Defendants did not comply with the
compensation terms required by the Agreement
and in the scoring of the motion pictures employed
persons who were not Musicians under the terms
of the Agreement outside of the United States or
Canada, in violation of the Agreement.

CLAIMS FOR RELIEF
COUNT ONE
Declaratory Judgment
(Against all Defendants)

19. The allegations in Paragraphs 1 through
18 above are re-alleged and incorporated
herein by reference.

20. Each of the Defendants was a “Producer” under
the terms of the Agreement in connection with the
production and scoring of one or more of the
Pictures.

21. Each of the Pictures was produced in the
United States and/or Canada within the terms
of the Agreement and during the effective term
of the Agreement and its extension. Pursuant
to the Agreement, each of the Pictures was
required to be scored in the United States or
Canada with Musicians represented by Plaintiff,
and Musicians represented by Plaintiff were
entitled to the compensation set out in the
Agreement.

22. Each of the Defendants employed musicians
to score each of the Pictures as to which it was
a Producer outside of the United States or Canada.

23. Each of the Defendants scored each of the
Pictures as to which it was a Producer outside
of the United States or Canada, in breach of
the express terms of the Agreement.

24. Accordingly, the AFM is entitled to a declaration
(1) that each Defendant was a Producer subject
to the terms of the Agreement with respect to
those motion pictures it is identified as a producer
of in paragraph 15; (2) that each Defendant breached
the Agreement when it scored the motion pictures
as to which it was a Producer outside of the United
States or Canada, and (3) that each Defendant
breached the Agreement when it failed to employ
AFM Musicians under the terms of the Agreement
to score the motion pictures produced in the
United States or Canada as to which it was a
Producer.

COUNT TWO
Breach of Contract
(Against Warner Brothers)
25. The allegations in Paragraphs 1
through 24 above are re-alleged
and incorporated herein by reference.

26. Defendant Warner Brothers was a
Producer under the terms of the Agreement
of the theatrical motion pictures Interstellar
and Journey 2: The Mysterious Island

27. Interstellar and Journey 2: The Mysterious Island
were produced in the United States.

28. Interstellar was scored outside
of the United States or Canada,
in Great Britain. With respect to
such work, proper compensation
and associated payments required
under the Agreement were not made
to or for the benefit of AFM members,
and the AFM and its affiliates were not
provided B Forms reflecting the number
of sessions performed, the musicians
used, and the payments made or due.

29. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island
was scored outside of the United States
or Canada, in Papau New Guinea and
Australia. With respect to such work,
proper compensation and associated
payments required under the Agreement
were not made to or for the benefit of
AFM members, and the AFM and its
affiliates were not provided B Forms
reflecting the number of sessions
performed, the musicians used,
and the payments made or due.

30. By scoring Interstellar and Journey 2:
The Mysterious Island outside the United
States or Canada, Warner Brothers violated
and breached the terms of the Agreement.

31. Warner Brothers’s violations and
breaches of the Agreement have caused
financial injuries to the AFM and its
members, in an amount to be proven
at trial.

COIUNT THREE
Breach of Contract

29 U.S.C. § 185
(Against Paramount)
32. The allegations in Paragraphs 1
through 31 above are re-alleged
and incorporated herein by reference.

33. Defendant Paramount was a Producer under the terms
of the Agreement of the theatrical motion pictures
Interstellar and Robocop
.
34. Interstellar was produced in the United
States and Robocop was produced in the
United States and Canada.

35. Interstellar was scored outside of the
United States or Canada, in Great Britain.
With respect to such work, proper compensation
and associated payments required under the
Agreement were not made to or for the benefit
of AFM members, and the AFM and its affiliates
were not provided B Forms reflecting the number
of sessions performed, the musicians used, and
the payments made or due.

36. Robocop was scored outside of the United States or
Canada, in Great Britain. With respect to such work,
proper compensation and associated payments required
under the Agreement were not made to or for the benefit
of AFM members, and the AFM and its affiliates were not
provided B Forms reflecting the number of sessions
performed, the musicians used, and the payments
made or due.

37. By scoring Interstellar and Robocop outside the United
States or Canada, Paramount violated and breached the
terms of the Agreement.

38. Paramount’s violations and breaches of the
Agreement have caused financial injuries to the
AFM and its members, in an amount to be proven
at trial.

COUNT FOUR
Breach of Contract

29 U.S.C. § 185
(Against MGM)
39. The allegations in Paragraphs 1 through 38 above
are re-alleged and incorporated herein by reference.
40. Defendant MGM was a Producer under the terms of the
Agreement of the theatrical motion pictures Carrie and
Robocop
.
41. Carrie was produced in Canada
and Robocop was produced in
the United States and Canada.

42. Carrie was scored outside of the United
States or Canada, in Great Britain. With respect
to such work, proper compensation and associated
payments required under the Agreement were
not made to or for the benefit of AFM members,
and the AFM and its affiliates were not provided
B Forms reflecting the number of sessions
performed, the musicians used, and the payments
made or due.

43. Robocop was scored outside of the United States or
Canada, in Great Britain. With respect to such work,
proper compensation and associated payments required
under the Agreement were not made to or for the benefit
of AFM members, and the AFM and its affiliates were
not provided B Forms reflecting the number of sessions
performed, the musicians used, and the payments
made or due.

44. By scoring Carrie and Robocop outside the United

States or Canada, MGM violated and breached the

terms of the Agreement.

45. MGM’s violations and breaches of the Agreement

have caused financial injuries to the AFM and its

members, in an amount to be proven at trial.

PRAYER FOR RELIEF
WHEREFORE, the AFM respectfully requests that

this Court:

(1) Issue the declaratory judgment requested in COUNT ONE;
(2) Award the AFM damages for all losses suffered
by the AFM and its members as a result of Defendants’
breaches of the Agreement as set out in COUNT
TWO, COUNT THREE, AND COUNT FOUR;

(3) Order each Defendant to make appropriate contributions
to the American Federation of Musicians and Employers’
Pension Fund, various health benefit funds, and to the
Film Musicians Secondary Markets Fund for the benefit
of Musicians that would have been made if Defendants
had not breached the Agreement as set forth in COUNT
TWO, COUNT THREE, and COUNT FOUR;

(4) Order each of the Defendants to make such other payments
as may have been required if the motion pictures had been
scored under the terms of the Agreement in the United
States or Canada;

(5) Award the Plaintiff pre-judgment interest as required

by law; and

(6) Order such other and further relief as this Court

may deem appropriate.
JURY DEMAND
Plaintiff demands a trial by jury on all claims so triable.

Respectfully submitted,
DATED: April 24, 2015
/S/ Lewis N. Levy
LEWIS N. LEVY, Bar No.
105975
DANIEL R. BARTH, Bar No. 274009
Levy, Ford & Wallach
3619 Motor Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90034
Email: LLevy@lfwlawyers.com
DBarth@lfwlawyers.com
JEFFREY R. FREUND (pro hac vice
application forthcoming)
ROBERT ALEXANDER (pro hac
vice
application forthcoming)
ABIGAIL V. CARTER (pro hac vice
application forthcoming)
PHILIP C. ANDONIAN (application for
admission pending)
Bredhoff & Kaiser, PLLC
805 15th Street N.W., Suite 100
Washington, D.C. 20005
Email: jfreund@bredhoff.com
ral
exander@bredhoff.com
acarter@bredhoff.com
pandonian@bredhoff.com
Attorneys for Plaintiff

[EC: So, repeatedly in the above lawsuit, Levy et al state:
Award the AFM damages for all losses suffered
by the AFM and its members as a result of Defendants’
breaches of the Agreement as set out in COUNT
TWO, COUNT THREE, AND COUNT FOUR;

Who’s going to decide which musicians get
those payments? Don’t hold your breathe,
you know exactly who they will go to.

If they lose the only ones making out
will be Levy and Company. If they win,
the rank and file will never see a cent.

It seems the Local 47 administration has
become the Donald Trump of the music
industry. Regardless of what happens, they
NEVER take responsibility for their incompetence,
it’s always on someone else, in this case
the studios, for making the AFM unusable.
It’s the contracts that make the AFM unusable,
and it is also the result of the AFM/LOCAL 47
protecting the RMA to the exclusion of
everyone else.

As it turns out, they’re spending our 10
million leftover from the building sale to
try to fatten the pockets of the elites, much
like Trump does. It’s our money, but it’s
certainly not being spent on the rank
and file. All they’re missing is their Mar-a Lago.]

THE ORIGINAL COMPLAINT CAN BE FOUND HERE:
read it here

=================================

IV. MEMBER COMMENT

An article in WSJ  April 19, 2017 “HOLLYWOOD DOESN’T
WORK WITHOUT CHINA” front page continued on page 12,
read if you get a chance!

This not only describes how the Film & TV industry has
changed since 2008 but why, it’s what the future will
look like. Show me the money or sell it to China.

Also, a speculation, could even factor into our Pension
plan if the studios become desperate to stay afloat.
It could all disappear, worse case scenario.

Right now it has to be great for residuals catering
to a global community like never before.  Don’t
expect any buyouts anywhere in the future while
the ramla are in charge.

=================================

V. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

—————————————–

4/23/17

Malibu Friends of Music’s
Montgomery Arts House
For Music & Architecture
(MAHMA)
in partnership with

University of Rochester’s
Eastman School of Music
present

EASTMAN IN MALIBU

NICHOLAS GOLUSES
Classic Guitarist
with the
MALIBU COAST CHAMBER ORCHESTRA SOLISTI
Scott Hosfeld, Music Director

APRIL 23rd, 2017 at 3:30 pm
inside the beautiful
MAHMA MUSIC ROOM

ALSO FEATURING RESIDENT ARTISTS:
Maria Newman, violinist
Scott Hosfeld, violist
Paula Hochhalter, cellist
Wendy Prober, pianist

AND PRESENTING:
Jamal Rossi, Joan and Martin Messinger Dean:
Eastman School of Music ~ University of Rochester

MUSIC OF:
Astor Piazzolla, Antonio Vivaldi, Manual da Falla,
Niccolo Paganini, and Maria Newman
…and a little taste of MAHMA:
TENDER HEARTS (1909) Silent Short Film
Starring America’s Sweetheart, Mary Pickford

——————————————

4/6/17

The SCL Presents:
BEYOND THE POLKA with Cory Pesaturo
WRITING FOR ACCORDION

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th, 2017
7:30PM
The Village Studios | Auditorium
1616 Butler Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90025

Parking available in adjacent lot, or $2 street parking
public lots nearby:

Cory Pesaturo is one of only four accordionists to win
world championships on both the acoustic and digital
accordion and is the only person to also win a world
championship in jazz.  He is a graduate of the New
England Conservatory of Music, where he was the
first musician ever to major and graduate in the accordion.

Cory’s primary contribution to the instrument is
his visionary thinking of how the accordion
should be used, played, and presented in modern
music. Cory currently gives masterclasses on
music theory and the accordion throughout the
US and Europe. He is developing his own electric
accordion, and has created the first ever skinned
accordion that includes a symmetric midi lighting
system attached to the keys.

——————————————

4/23/17

The BBB featuring Bernie Dresel

This Sunday April 23rd from 7-8:30
at
BOGIES in Westlake Village
(right off the 101 at Lindero Canyon Road exit.)
call 818-889-2394 for ticket reservations
$20 cover charge
32001 Agoura Road, Westlake Village, CA 91361

Come join The BBB featuring Bernie Dresel,
(13 horns, upright bass, guitar, and plenty of drums)
at this gorgeous new club swingin’ & rockin’
selections from our brand new album, Live n’ Bernin’,
featuring high-octane, new & original arrangements
by Walter Murphy, Steve Bramson, Nan Schwartz,
Jim McMillen, Tim Simonec, Bill Cunliffe, Scott Healy,
Andrew Neu, Brian Williams, and Jeff Bunnell.

Our new album Live n’ Bernin’ will be available for
sale at this show.
(Also available online at CDBaby and Amazon,
as well as downloads on iTunes, CDBaby and Amazon).

——————————————

4/29/17

LOS ANGELES CLARINET CHOIR SPRING CONCERT
Saturday, April 29 at 8PM-9PM
Barrett Recital Hall
Pasadena Conservatory of Music
100 North Hill Street
Pasadena, CA 91106

The Los Angeles Clarinet Choir, 15 clarinetists
directed by Margaret Thornhill and Victoria Ramos,
gives the World Premiere of “Hajdu’s Nigun” for
clarinet ensemble by Matti Kovler, and performs
other signature works by Japanese, Brazillian,
German and American composers.

Tickets are $20 general, $15 students and seniors.
Seating limited; advance purchase recommended
through www.brownpapertickets.com

——————————————

4/30/17

FREE CONCERT for the Public

THE PHIL NORMAN TENTET
AT THE
Ascension Lutheron Church
Sunday April 30th @ 5pm
1600 E. Hillcrest Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA. 91362

No Reservations Needed

Remembering the classic sounds
& variations of 12 jazz legends
to include:

The George Shearing Quintet
The Dave Brubeck Quartet
The Modern Jazz Quartet
The Cal Tjader Quintet
the Ahmad Jamal Trio
Miles, Dizzy and more

——————————————

5/1/17 DEADLINE

NORTH/SOUTH CONSONANCE
2017 Call for Scores

All composers are eligible for consideration
Solo, chamber ensembles and chamber orchestra works
up to 18 performers will be considered

Vocalists, percussion and/or electronics are acceptable

One work will be selected for recording on the North/South
label

$30 (US Dlls) non-refundable fee per composition
submitted required

Online Submissions at
http://www.northsouthmusic.org/Score-Submissions

Complete submission guidelines at
http://www.northsouthmusic.org/Call-For-Scores

——————————————

5/3/17

Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts series
(concerts every first & third Wednesday at 12:10-12:40 pm)
are listed at http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you for your support in publicizing the Glendale
Noon Concerts!

Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, GNC
818 249 -5108

On Wednesday  May 3, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
pianist Charles Fierro performing Debussy Preludes
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

PROGRAM:
MAY 3, 2017
CHARLES FIERRO Piano Recital
DEBUSSY: SELECTED PRELUDES
The Dancers of Delphi
Sails
The Girl with the Flaxen Hair
What the West Wind Saw
The Engulfed Cathdral
The Interrupted Serenade
The Hills of Anacapri
Minstrels

————————————–

5/5/17

DOCTOR WU PERFORMANCE

We’ll be doing one set starting promptly at 8:00 PM at the Saint
Francis de Sales Festival on Friday, May 5th:

Saint Francis de Sales School
13368 Valleyheart Drive
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

The Doctor Wu Band line up for this show will be:

Tony Egan: Lead Vocals
Leigh DeMarche: Vocals
Jodi Fodor: Vocals
Gil Ayan: Guitar
Steve Bias: Bass and Vocals
Jeff Dellisanti: Saxophones
Mark Harrison: Keyboards
Paul Salvo: Trumpet
Frank Villafranca: Saxophones
Jack Cook: Drums

Admission is free and we look forward to seeing you there!
The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

—————————————————————————–

7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

—————————————-
UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE

RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47