DEADLINE HOLLYWOOD / SUIT AGAINST STUDIOS / LAWSUIT DETAILS / COMMENT / EVENTS

4/20/17
I. DEADLINE: HOLLYWOOD ARTICLE

II. OUTSOURCING SUIT AGAINST STUDIOS
III. LAWSUIT AGAINST STUDIOS (DETAILS)
IV. MEMBER COMMENT
V. EVENTS
…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

===================================

I. DEADLINE: HOLLYWOOD ARTICLE

Saying that its contracts have been “put at serious risk” by
“work done in the shadows,” Local 47 of the American Federation
of Musicians is preparing to launch a campaign “to ensure that
musicians can earn a livable wage working in Los Angeles.”
Related
WGA Video Urges Yes Vote On Strike Authorization

AFM Local 47
In a recent communique with its members, the local’s executive
board said more and more musicians “are being asked to record
music for major, well-funded projects without union contracts.
If union contracts are made irrelevant by work done in the
shadows, the floor for pay will drop for both union and non-
union musicians.” Read the full message below.
In many cases, union musicians are forced to choose between
working nonunion or not working at all. “These employment
practices are especially divisive and pernicious,” the executive
board said, “because they exert enormous pressure on
individual union members.”

The local’s current contract with the major studios doesn’t
expire until next April, but it’s already gearing up for a
tough round of bargaining. One of the challenges it’s
facing is the trend toward using foreign orchestras to
score films and TV shows that were shot right here
in Los Angeles. Another problem is that the AFM’s
multibillion-dollar pension plan is in “critical” condition.

Related Warner Bros, MGM & Paramount Hit With Outsourcing
Suit By Musicians Union

“The actuary certified that for the plan years beginning
April 1, 2016, and 2015, respectively, the plan is in
‘critical’ status under the Pension Protection Act of 2006,”
according to the AFM Pension Plan’s latest financial
report. As such, the Plan’s board of trustees was
required by law to adopt a rehabilitation plan
designed to improve its financial health and to
allow it to emerge from critical status.

“We all know what it is like to wonder where your
next call is going to come from or how you are
going to pay your bills,” the executive board said.
“No single musician can stop the forces that
undermine our profession, but as a union we
have always been able to push back. We believe
that it is now necessary to take action together.”
[EC: See late weeks Blog for the full message text.]

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II. OUTSOURCING SUIT AGAINST STUDIOS
Warner Bros, MGM & Paramount Hit With Outsourcing Suit By Musicians Union

by Dominic Patten

According to the American Federation of Musicians, the

songs did not remain the same — or at least in the places

they were supposed to be. The 80,000-member-strong

union slammed Warner Bros, Paramount Pictures and

MGM last week in federal court with a breach of contract

lawsuit over four features’ music scores, including the

Hans Zimmer score for Paramount’s Interstellar, which

was nominated for an Oscar this year. The AFM alleges

that the trio of studios broke a 2010 agreement to

ensure that the music for movies made in the U.S.

and Canada was made here too.

“The AFM brings this …action to remedy Defendants’

violations of their respective obligations to employ AFM

members under the terms of the collective bargaining

agreement in recording music in connection with the

production of theatrical motion pictures (referred to

as ‘scoring’) titled (1) Interstellar, (2) Journey 2:

The Mysterious Island, (3) Robocop, and (4) Carrie,

all of which were produced by one or more of the

Defendants in the United States or Canada,  but

were scored, in violation of the agreement,
outside the United States or Canada,” says the
11-page complaint (read it here) seeking a jury trial.
Intersteller, Robocop and Carrie were scored in the

UK, and Journey 2 was produced in Australia and

Papua New Guinea.

[EC: Notice the only commonality of all these actions? To
protect the RMA elites.]

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III. LAWSUIT AGAINST STUDIOS (DETAILS)
LEWIS N. LEVY, Bar No. 105975
DANIEL R. BARTH, Bar No. 274009
Levy, Ford & Wallach
3619 Motor Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90034
Telephone: (213) 380

3140
Facsimile: (213) 480-3284
Email:
LLevy@lfwlawyers.com
DBarth@lfwlawyers.com
JEFFREY R. FREUND (pro hac vice application forthcoming)
ROBERT ALEXANDER (pro hac vice application forthcoming)
ABIGAIL V. CARTER (pro hac vice application forthcoming)
PHILIP C. ANDONIAN (applicationfor admission pending)
Bredhoff & Kaiser, PLLC
805 15th
Street N.W., Suite 100
Washington, D.C. 20005
Email: jfreund@bredhoff.com
ralexander@bredhoff.com
acarter@bredhoff.com
pandonian@bredhoff.com
Attorneys for Plaintiff
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF
MUSICIANS OF THE UNITED
STATES AND CANADA
Plaintiff v. WARNER BROTHERS
ENTERTAINMENT, INC., PARAMOUNT
PICTURES, INC., and METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
PICTURES, INC.
Defendants.
CASE NO. 2:15-CV-3069
COMPLAINT
JURY TRIAL DEMANDED
NATURE OF THE CASE

1. This is an action under §301 of the Labor Management
Relations Act (“LMRA”), 29 U.S.C
. § 185, for violations of a collective bargaining
agreement to which the Plaintiff American Federation
of Musicians of the United States and Canada
(hereinafter “AFM”) and the Defendants Warner Brothers
Entertainment, Inc. (hereinafter “Warner Brothers”),
Paramount Pictures

Corporation (hereinafter “Paramount”), and Metro
-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, Inc.
(hereinafter “MGM”) (collectively “Defendants”) are parties.
The AFM brings this § 301 action to remedy Defendants’
violations of their respective obligations
to employ AFM members under the terms of the
collective bargaining agreement in recording
music in connection with the production of
theatrical motion pictures (referred to as
“scoring”) titled
(1) Interstellar,
(2) Journey 2: The Mysterious Island,
(3) Robocop, and
(4) Carrie, all of which were produced by one
or more of the Defendants in the United
States or Canada, but were scored, in
violation of the agreement, outside the
United States or Canada. This action
seeks to recover appropriate breach of
contract damages, including but not limited
to musician wages payable pursuant to the
agreement, to compel Defendants to make the
contributions due under the agreement to
certain separate musician funds that are
maintained under that agreement for the
benefit of AFM musicians, and to obtain a
court declaration of the AFM’s and its
members’ rights and of the Defendants’
duties with respect to the collective
bargaining agreement in relation to each
Defendant’s violation of that agreement.
JURISDICTION AND VENUE

2. This Court has jurisdiction over this lawsuit
and parties pursuant to 29 U.S.C. § 185
and 28 U.S.C. § 1331.

3. Venue lies in this District pursuant to
29 U.S.C. § 185(a) and 28 U.S.C. § 1391(b).

PARTIES

4. The Plaintiff AFM is a labor organization
that represents approximately 80,000 professional
musicians in the United States and Canada, including
many hundreds of studio recording musicians who
work to score motion pictures produced in this
District and throughout the United States and Canada.

The AFM is “a labor organization representing
employees in an industry affecting commerce”
within the meaning of the federal statute,
29 U.S.C. § 185, authorizing “[s]uits for violation
of contracts” between such a labor organization
and “an employer.”

5. The Defendant Warner Brothers produces theatrical
motion pictures through its motion picture units,
including Warner Brothers Pictures and New Line
Cinema, and employs in the United States and
Canada professional musicians represented by
the AFM in their production. Warner Brothers
maintains its headquarters at 4000 Warner
Boulevard, Burbank, CA 91522, and engages in
business on a regular basis in the Central
District of California.

6. The Defendant Paramount produces theatrical
motion pictures and employs in the United States
and Canada professional musicians represented
by the AFM in their production. Paramount maintains
its headquarters at 5555 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles,
CA 90038, and engages in business on a regular
basis in the Central District of California.

7. The Defendant MGM produces theatrical motion pictures
and employs in the United States and Canada professional
musicians represented by the AFM in their production.
MGM maintains its headquarters at 245 N Beverly Drive,
Beverly Hills, CA 90210, and engages in business on
a regular basis in the Central District of California.

8. Each of the Defendants is “an employer” within
the meaning of the federal statute, 29 U.S.C. § 185,
authorizing “[s]uits for violation of contracts”
between such an employer and “a labor organization
representing employees in an industry affecting commerce.”

FACTS

9. At all times relevant to this lawsuit,
the AFM and each of the Defendants were
parties to a collective bargaining agreement,
titled “Basic Theatrical Motion Picture Agreement
of 2010” (hereinafter “Agreement”). The
Agreement is a contract between Defendants as
employers and the AFM as a labor organization
representing employee musicians within the
meaning of 29 U.S.C.

§185. Each of the Defendants is a
“Producer” as to certain theatrical
motion pictures within the terms of the
Agreement. When executed, the terms of
the Agreement were effective for the
period April 14, 2010 through February
23, 2013, and were subsequently extended
through April 4, 2015.

10. The Agreement set out wage and benefit
terms for various defined categories of AFM
members, including, inter alia, instrumental and
orchestral musicians who work to score theatrical
motion pictures (“Musicians”).

The Agreement governed all work by Musicians
“employed by the Producer in the State of California
or elsewhere in the United States and Canada and
whose services are rendered in connection with
the production of theatrical motions pictures.”
Services “rendered in connection with the production
of theatrical motion pictures” include, but are not
limited to, recording of music for use in
connection with the production, known as “scoring.”

11. The Agreement required that “[a]ll
theatrical motion pictures produced by
the Producer in the United States or
Canada, if scored, shall be scored
in the United States or Canada,” unless
excused by the AFM under circumstances
not present here.

12. With respect to a motion picture that
is required to be scored in the United
States or Canada under the terms of the
Agreement, Producers were required to
employ Musicians under the terms of the
Agreement, and were required, among
other things, to provide compensation in
accordance with the compensation terms
specified in the Agreement. A Producer’s
compensation obligations under the
Agreement include, but are not limited
to: (i) the obligation to make specified
minimum wage and other payments; (ii)
the obligation to make a specified level
of contributions to the American Federation
of Musicians and Employers’ Pension Fund,
and various health benefit funds; and (iii)
if appropriate, make contributions to the
Film Musicians Secondary Markets Fund
for the benefit of Musicians.

13. When a motion picture is required to
be scored pursuant to the terms of the
Agreement in the United States or Canada,
and when Producers employed Musicians
pursuant to the terms of the Agreement to
perform work covered by the Agreement,
each Musician’s total hours of service and
total wages paid for covered work must be
reported to the AFM. The reporting process
includes, but is not limited to, submitting
standardized documents known as “B forms,”
which records the work performed by the
Musicians, their wages, and their benefits
contributions.

14. During the term of the Agreement, including
its extension, the following were among the
theatrical motion pictures produced in the
United States and/or Canada by one or more
of the Defendants:
(1) Interstellar;
(2) Journey 2: The Mysterious Island;
(3) Robocop; and
(4) Carrie
(collectively “the Pictures”).

15. Warner Brothers was a Producer subject
to the terms of the Agreement regarding
the motion pictures Interstellar and Journey 2:
The Mysterious Island; MGM was a Producer
subject to the terms of the Agreement regarding
the motion pictures Robocop and Carrie; and
Paramount was a Producer subject to the terms
of the Agreement regarding Interstellar and Robocop.

16. Each of the Pictures was scored under the
meaning of the Agreement.

17. Each of the Pictures was scored outside of the
United States or Canada in violation of the Agreement.
On information and belief, Interstellar, Carrie, and
Robocop were each scored in Great Britain, and
Journey 2: The Mysterious Island was scored in
Papau New Guinea and Australia.

18. The Defendants did not comply with the
compensation terms required by the Agreement
and in the scoring of the motion pictures employed
persons who were not Musicians under the terms
of the Agreement outside of the United States or
Canada, in violation of the Agreement.

CLAIMS FOR RELIEF
COUNT ONE
Declaratory Judgment
(Against all Defendants)

19. The allegations in Paragraphs 1 through
18 above are re-alleged and incorporated
herein by reference.

20. Each of the Defendants was a “Producer” under
the terms of the Agreement in connection with the
production and scoring of one or more of the
Pictures.

21. Each of the Pictures was produced in the
United States and/or Canada within the terms
of the Agreement and during the effective term
of the Agreement and its extension. Pursuant
to the Agreement, each of the Pictures was
required to be scored in the United States or
Canada with Musicians represented by Plaintiff,
and Musicians represented by Plaintiff were
entitled to the compensation set out in the
Agreement.

22. Each of the Defendants employed musicians
to score each of the Pictures as to which it was
a Producer outside of the United States or Canada.

23. Each of the Defendants scored each of the
Pictures as to which it was a Producer outside
of the United States or Canada, in breach of
the express terms of the Agreement.

24. Accordingly, the AFM is entitled to a declaration
(1) that each Defendant was a Producer subject
to the terms of the Agreement with respect to
those motion pictures it is identified as a producer
of in paragraph 15; (2) that each Defendant breached
the Agreement when it scored the motion pictures
as to which it was a Producer outside of the United
States or Canada, and (3) that each Defendant
breached the Agreement when it failed to employ
AFM Musicians under the terms of the Agreement
to score the motion pictures produced in the
United States or Canada as to which it was a
Producer.

COUNT TWO
Breach of Contract
(Against Warner Brothers)
25. The allegations in Paragraphs 1
through 24 above are re-alleged
and incorporated herein by reference.

26. Defendant Warner Brothers was a
Producer under the terms of the Agreement
of the theatrical motion pictures Interstellar
and Journey 2: The Mysterious Island

27. Interstellar and Journey 2: The Mysterious Island
were produced in the United States.

28. Interstellar was scored outside
of the United States or Canada,
in Great Britain. With respect to
such work, proper compensation
and associated payments required
under the Agreement were not made
to or for the benefit of AFM members,
and the AFM and its affiliates were not
provided B Forms reflecting the number
of sessions performed, the musicians
used, and the payments made or due.

29. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island
was scored outside of the United States
or Canada, in Papau New Guinea and
Australia. With respect to such work,
proper compensation and associated
payments required under the Agreement
were not made to or for the benefit of
AFM members, and the AFM and its
affiliates were not provided B Forms
reflecting the number of sessions
performed, the musicians used,
and the payments made or due.

30. By scoring Interstellar and Journey 2:
The Mysterious Island outside the United
States or Canada, Warner Brothers violated
and breached the terms of the Agreement.

31. Warner Brothers’s violations and
breaches of the Agreement have caused
financial injuries to the AFM and its
members, in an amount to be proven
at trial.

COIUNT THREE
Breach of Contract

29 U.S.C. § 185
(Against Paramount)
32. The allegations in Paragraphs 1
through 31 above are re-alleged
and incorporated herein by reference.

33. Defendant Paramount was a Producer under the terms
of the Agreement of the theatrical motion pictures
Interstellar and Robocop
.
34. Interstellar was produced in the United
States and Robocop was produced in the
United States and Canada.

35. Interstellar was scored outside of the
United States or Canada, in Great Britain.
With respect to such work, proper compensation
and associated payments required under the
Agreement were not made to or for the benefit
of AFM members, and the AFM and its affiliates
were not provided B Forms reflecting the number
of sessions performed, the musicians used, and
the payments made or due.

36. Robocop was scored outside of the United States or
Canada, in Great Britain. With respect to such work,
proper compensation and associated payments required
under the Agreement were not made to or for the benefit
of AFM members, and the AFM and its affiliates were not
provided B Forms reflecting the number of sessions
performed, the musicians used, and the payments
made or due.

37. By scoring Interstellar and Robocop outside the United
States or Canada, Paramount violated and breached the
terms of the Agreement.

38. Paramount’s violations and breaches of the
Agreement have caused financial injuries to the
AFM and its members, in an amount to be proven
at trial.

COUNT FOUR
Breach of Contract

29 U.S.C. § 185
(Against MGM)
39. The allegations in Paragraphs 1 through 38 above
are re-alleged and incorporated herein by reference.
40. Defendant MGM was a Producer under the terms of the
Agreement of the theatrical motion pictures Carrie and
Robocop
.
41. Carrie was produced in Canada
and Robocop was produced in
the United States and Canada.

42. Carrie was scored outside of the United
States or Canada, in Great Britain. With respect
to such work, proper compensation and associated
payments required under the Agreement were
not made to or for the benefit of AFM members,
and the AFM and its affiliates were not provided
B Forms reflecting the number of sessions
performed, the musicians used, and the payments
made or due.

43. Robocop was scored outside of the United States or
Canada, in Great Britain. With respect to such work,
proper compensation and associated payments required
under the Agreement were not made to or for the benefit
of AFM members, and the AFM and its affiliates were
not provided B Forms reflecting the number of sessions
performed, the musicians used, and the payments
made or due.

44. By scoring Carrie and Robocop outside the United

States or Canada, MGM violated and breached the

terms of the Agreement.

45. MGM’s violations and breaches of the Agreement

have caused financial injuries to the AFM and its

members, in an amount to be proven at trial.

PRAYER FOR RELIEF
WHEREFORE, the AFM respectfully requests that

this Court:

(1) Issue the declaratory judgment requested in COUNT ONE;
(2) Award the AFM damages for all losses suffered
by the AFM and its members as a result of Defendants’
breaches of the Agreement as set out in COUNT
TWO, COUNT THREE, AND COUNT FOUR;

(3) Order each Defendant to make appropriate contributions
to the American Federation of Musicians and Employers’
Pension Fund, various health benefit funds, and to the
Film Musicians Secondary Markets Fund for the benefit
of Musicians that would have been made if Defendants
had not breached the Agreement as set forth in COUNT
TWO, COUNT THREE, and COUNT FOUR;

(4) Order each of the Defendants to make such other payments
as may have been required if the motion pictures had been
scored under the terms of the Agreement in the United
States or Canada;

(5) Award the Plaintiff pre-judgment interest as required

by law; and

(6) Order such other and further relief as this Court

may deem appropriate.
JURY DEMAND
Plaintiff demands a trial by jury on all claims so triable.

Respectfully submitted,
DATED: April 24, 2015
/S/ Lewis N. Levy
LEWIS N. LEVY, Bar No.
105975
DANIEL R. BARTH, Bar No. 274009
Levy, Ford & Wallach
3619 Motor Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90034
Email: LLevy@lfwlawyers.com
DBarth@lfwlawyers.com
JEFFREY R. FREUND (pro hac vice
application forthcoming)
ROBERT ALEXANDER (pro hac
vice
application forthcoming)
ABIGAIL V. CARTER (pro hac vice
application forthcoming)
PHILIP C. ANDONIAN (application for
admission pending)
Bredhoff & Kaiser, PLLC
805 15th Street N.W., Suite 100
Washington, D.C. 20005
Email: jfreund@bredhoff.com
ral
exander@bredhoff.com
acarter@bredhoff.com
pandonian@bredhoff.com
Attorneys for Plaintiff

[EC: So, repeatedly in the above lawsuit, Levy et al state:
Award the AFM damages for all losses suffered
by the AFM and its members as a result of Defendants’
breaches of the Agreement as set out in COUNT
TWO, COUNT THREE, AND COUNT FOUR;

Who’s going to decide which musicians get
those payments? Don’t hold your breathe,
you know exactly who they will go to.

If they lose the only ones making out
will be Levy and Company. If they win,
the rank and file will never see a cent.

It seems the Local 47 administration has
become the Donald Trump of the music
industry. Regardless of what happens, they
NEVER take responsibility for their incompetence,
it’s always on someone else, in this case
the studios, for making the AFM unusable.
It’s the contracts that make the AFM unusable,
and it is also the result of the AFM/LOCAL 47
protecting the RMA to the exclusion of
everyone else.

As it turns out, they’re spending our 10
million leftover from the building sale to
try to fatten the pockets of the elites, much
like Trump does. It’s our money, but it’s
certainly not being spent on the rank
and file. All they’re missing is their Mar-a Lago.]

THE ORIGINAL COMPLAINT CAN BE FOUND HERE:
read it here

=================================

IV. MEMBER COMMENT

An article in WSJ  April 19, 2017 “HOLLYWOOD DOESN’T
WORK WITHOUT CHINA” front page continued on page 12,
read if you get a chance!

This not only describes how the Film & TV industry has
changed since 2008 but why, it’s what the future will
look like. Show me the money or sell it to China.

Also, a speculation, could even factor into our Pension
plan if the studios become desperate to stay afloat.
It could all disappear, worse case scenario.

Right now it has to be great for residuals catering
to a global community like never before.  Don’t
expect any buyouts anywhere in the future while
the ramla are in charge.

=================================

V. EVENTS
DEAN AND RICHARD
are now at Culver City Elks the first 
Friday of 
every month.
7:30pm-10:30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

————————————-

LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584
NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at
Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, 
Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way
they 
should 
be. 

We are in the back room called
the Trailside Room. 


Come on down.

Guaranteed to swing.

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4/23/17

Malibu Friends of Music’s
Montgomery Arts House
For Music & Architecture
(MAHMA)
in partnership with

University of Rochester’s
Eastman School of Music
present

EASTMAN IN MALIBU

NICHOLAS GOLUSES
Classic Guitarist
with the
MALIBU COAST CHAMBER ORCHESTRA SOLISTI
Scott Hosfeld, Music Director

APRIL 23rd, 2017 at 3:30 pm
inside the beautiful
MAHMA MUSIC ROOM

ALSO FEATURING RESIDENT ARTISTS:
Maria Newman, violinist
Scott Hosfeld, violist
Paula Hochhalter, cellist
Wendy Prober, pianist

AND PRESENTING:
Jamal Rossi, Joan and Martin Messinger Dean:
Eastman School of Music ~ University of Rochester

MUSIC OF:
Astor Piazzolla, Antonio Vivaldi, Manual da Falla,
Niccolo Paganini, and Maria Newman
…and a little taste of MAHMA:
TENDER HEARTS (1909) Silent Short Film
Starring America’s Sweetheart, Mary Pickford

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4/6/17

The SCL Presents:
BEYOND THE POLKA with Cory Pesaturo
WRITING FOR ACCORDION

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26th, 2017
7:30PM
The Village Studios | Auditorium
1616 Butler Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90025

Parking available in adjacent lot, or $2 street parking
public lots nearby:

Cory Pesaturo is one of only four accordionists to win
world championships on both the acoustic and digital
accordion and is the only person to also win a world
championship in jazz.  He is a graduate of the New
England Conservatory of Music, where he was the
first musician ever to major and graduate in the accordion.

Cory’s primary contribution to the instrument is
his visionary thinking of how the accordion
should be used, played, and presented in modern
music. Cory currently gives masterclasses on
music theory and the accordion throughout the
US and Europe. He is developing his own electric
accordion, and has created the first ever skinned
accordion that includes a symmetric midi lighting
system attached to the keys.

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4/23/17

The BBB featuring Bernie Dresel

This Sunday April 23rd from 7-8:30
at
BOGIES in Westlake Village
(right off the 101 at Lindero Canyon Road exit.)
call 818-889-2394 for ticket reservations
$20 cover charge
32001 Agoura Road, Westlake Village, CA 91361

Come join The BBB featuring Bernie Dresel,
(13 horns, upright bass, guitar, and plenty of drums)
at this gorgeous new club swingin’ & rockin’
selections from our brand new album, Live n’ Bernin’,
featuring high-octane, new & original arrangements
by Walter Murphy, Steve Bramson, Nan Schwartz,
Jim McMillen, Tim Simonec, Bill Cunliffe, Scott Healy,
Andrew Neu, Brian Williams, and Jeff Bunnell.

Our new album Live n’ Bernin’ will be available for
sale at this show.
(Also available online at CDBaby and Amazon,
as well as downloads on iTunes, CDBaby and Amazon).

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4/29/17

LOS ANGELES CLARINET CHOIR SPRING CONCERT
Saturday, April 29 at 8PM-9PM
Barrett Recital Hall
Pasadena Conservatory of Music
100 North Hill Street
Pasadena, CA 91106

The Los Angeles Clarinet Choir, 15 clarinetists
directed by Margaret Thornhill and Victoria Ramos,
gives the World Premiere of “Hajdu’s Nigun” for
clarinet ensemble by Matti Kovler, and performs
other signature works by Japanese, Brazillian,
German and American composers.

Tickets are $20 general, $15 students and seniors.
Seating limited; advance purchase recommended
through www.brownpapertickets.com

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4/30/17

FREE CONCERT for the Public

THE PHIL NORMAN TENTET
AT THE
Ascension Lutheron Church
Sunday April 30th @ 5pm
1600 E. Hillcrest Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA. 91362

No Reservations Needed

Remembering the classic sounds
& variations of 12 jazz legends
to include:

The George Shearing Quintet
The Dave Brubeck Quartet
The Modern Jazz Quartet
The Cal Tjader Quintet
the Ahmad Jamal Trio
Miles, Dizzy and more

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5/1/17 DEADLINE

NORTH/SOUTH CONSONANCE
2017 Call for Scores

All composers are eligible for consideration
Solo, chamber ensembles and chamber orchestra works
up to 18 performers will be considered

Vocalists, percussion and/or electronics are acceptable

One work will be selected for recording on the North/South
label

$30 (US Dlls) non-refundable fee per composition
submitted required

Online Submissions at
http://www.northsouthmusic.org/Score-Submissions

Complete submission guidelines at
http://www.northsouthmusic.org/Call-For-Scores

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5/3/17

Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts series
(concerts every first & third Wednesday at 12:10-12:40 pm)
are listed at http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com
Thank you for your support in publicizing the Glendale
Noon Concerts!

Jacqueline Suzuki
Curator, GNC
818 249 -5108

On Wednesday  May 3, 2017 at 12:10-12:40 pm
the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts will feature
pianist Charles Fierro performing Debussy Preludes
at the Sanctuary of Glendale City Church,
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St), Glendale, CA 91206.
For more information, email glendalesda@gmail.com
or call (818) 244- 7241.

PROGRAM:
MAY 3, 2017
CHARLES FIERRO Piano Recital
DEBUSSY: SELECTED PRELUDES
The Dancers of Delphi
Sails
The Girl with the Flaxen Hair
What the West Wind Saw
The Engulfed Cathdral
The Interrupted Serenade
The Hills of Anacapri
Minstrels

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5/5/17

DOCTOR WU PERFORMANCE

We’ll be doing one set starting promptly at 8:00 PM at the Saint
Francis de Sales Festival on Friday, May 5th:

Saint Francis de Sales School
13368 Valleyheart Drive
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

The Doctor Wu Band line up for this show will be:

Tony Egan: Lead Vocals
Leigh DeMarche: Vocals
Jodi Fodor: Vocals
Gil Ayan: Guitar
Steve Bias: Bass and Vocals
Jeff Dellisanti: Saxophones
Mark Harrison: Keyboards
Paul Salvo: Trumpet
Frank Villafranca: Saxophones
Jack Cook: Drums

Admission is free and we look forward to seeing you there!
The Doctor Wu Band
http://www.doctorwuband.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doctorwuband

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7/11-14/17

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ WORKSHOP

The LA Jazz Society is proud to partner with Kim Richmond
and Kimberly Ford in presenting the Santa Barbara Jazz
Workshop, July 11-14, from Tuesday afternoon to Friday night.

A faculty of Jazz professionals teach instrumental/vocal master
classes, improvisation, Jazz Listening (How to listen, and who to
listen to.), modern Jazz combo and Big Band playing with concerts
each late afternoon (open to the public) where advanced students sit in

For more information, visit www.santabarbarajazzcamp.com.

Presented by Kim Richmond and Kimberly Ford
at the Marjorie Luke Theater and SOHO Jazz Club.

You can read all previous offerings at:
http://www.responsible47.com

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UNTIL NEXT TIME,

THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE

RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

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