FLASHBACK – LONDON / MEMBER COMMENT / ASMAC FUNCTIONS / EVENTS

I. FLASHBACK TIME – 2005 – PART II – LONDON
II. MEMBER COMMENT
III ASMAC UPCOMING FUNCTIONS
IV. EVENTS

…Absolutely guaranteed anonymity – Former Musician’s Union officer
…The one voice of reason in a sea of insanity – Nashville ‘first call’
scoring musician
…Allows us to speak our minds without fear of reprisal – L.A. Symphonic musician
…Reporting issues the Musicians Union doesn’t dare to mention – National touring musician

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I. FLASHBACK TIME – 2005 – PART II
LONDON

In 2005, a highly placed group of musicians, frustrated with the
destruction of work in recording, put forward this proposal.
Even then the damage to recording because of the unusable recording
contracts forced down the throats of AFM Members because of the
RMA was losing us major work – and that was almost 11 years ago.

AS A REMINDER, THIS WAS ALMOST 11 YEARS AGO….

MAY 2, 2005

How did we get here and what is our competition?

The following segments are from a variety of resources, illustrating
supporting data to back up our proposed changes to the national
Motion Picture and Low Budget Agreements.

London has been one of the most active recording cities in the world. [EC: Far more so now.]
Provisions in their recording contracts through the British Musicians Union
have made it economically favorable to record there. “Package deals” – such
as the combined use fee – bundles the soundtrack with the motion picture
for release in perpetuity and, in addition, there are actual total buyouts negotiated
on a project-by-project basis. The number of recording projects done in the UK,
brought in particularly by U.S. producers, speaks for itself in terms of the volume
of work leaving the U.S.

From the House of Commons/United Kingdom Parliament website:
http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200203/cmselect/cmcumeds/667/667we47.
htm

Excerpt from:
Memorandum submitted by the British Musicians Union
THE RIGHT TRACK: THE IMPORTANCE OF FILM TO UK MUSIC
CREATORS
RESPONSE TO THE CULTURE MEDIA AND SPORT SELECT COMMITTEE
INQUIRY INTO THE BRITISH FILM INDUSTRY
This short briefing outlines the importance of film music for British
musicians, refers to the success on the international scene of British
composers commissioned to write soundtracks for films and mentions
the importance of London as a location for recordings.

FILM SCORE RECORDING
More films scores are recorded in London than in any other city
in the world apart from Los Angeles [EC: No longer true]. More
than 30% of Hollywood scores come to London for recording and
synchronizing with picture. All the major and independent studios
return repeatedly, knowing that the musical artistry and technical
expertise here is virtually unrivalled anywhere in the world.

For instance, all the music for the Star Wars films was recorded in
London over many years and Lucas Film and composer, John Williams,
are due to return again.

So, why record in London? Well, producers, particularly Americans,
come here for three main reasons.

1. The UK is competitive on price.

2. The studio infrastructure is comparable only to Los Angeles in
terms of quality.

3. The sheer number and quality of musicians, again, is unequalled,
apart from in LA.

Annex B lists just some of the 152 Hollywood films that came to
London to record scores over the past three years. [2002-2005]
As a result of the rapid technological advances in digital sound
recording, it is now possible to achieve chart success through a
sound recording made in the bedroom of a small dwelling. However,
the large orchestral forces required for major film projects require
large studios and cutting edge technology. Again London is rivalled
only by Hollywood in this area with the same number of large scoring s
tages.

The main “state of the art” studios are:
— Abbey Road.
— Air Lyndhurst.
— Phoenix Sound.
— Sony Studios.
— Angel Studios.
— CTS at Watford. [No longer exists.]
[EC: It should be pointed out that London now has MORE large studios
than Los Angeles. We are down to three: Warner’s, Sony and Fox.

Music is recorded in the UK under the terms and conditions of the
agreement between the Producers Alliance for Cinema and Television
(PACT) and the Musicians Union (MU). Under the Combined Use
clauses of this agreement, which is used for theatrical and television
film, the producer acquires the right to incorporate the musicians
performance into the film and to use or license others to use the film
in all media throughout the world in perpetuity and to release the
music on commercial audio recordings.

In 1998 musicians’ basic fees alone amounted to £3.45 million. The
figure for 2001 is almost £4.2 million. These figures are net of studio
costs (which can average £3,000 to £6,000 per day), music
preparation, international transportation, hotels and other
considerable ancillary costs that further add to inward investment.

PROMOTING BRITISH MUSIC IN THE US

The UK’s trade promotion bodies, whether through Trade Partners UK
or the proposed UK music office in New York, could play an important
role in identifying opportunities and pro-actively marketing British
music creators to the US film industry. The potential for increased US
and international exposure, and the resulting economic returns, could
prove a useful boost to the UK music industry at this critical time in its
development.

From the UK Film website:
http://www.britfilmusa.com/d_film_music.php
Facilities
Did you know that the British music industry is worth £4 billion ($6
billion) a year? For a long time, the UK has been a virtuoso player in
the music production and recording business. And this success is due
mainly to the skill of Britain’s world-renowned musicians, composers
and technicians as well as the contribution made by the country’s
excellent recording facilities.

These skills and resources have, naturally, been snapped up by the
film industry, and scores written and/or recorded in the UK are an
intrinsic part of many internationally successful films. In fact, over
30% of Hollywood film scores alone are now recorded in the UK, and
London is second only to LA in terms of the number of music
soundtrack recordings it produces.

Pictures that have gained from their involvement with the UK’s
music production industry include:
Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels; The Full Monty; Billy Elliot;
Shakespeare In Love; Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace;
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin; Bridget Jones’s Diary; Lord of the Rings
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Titanic, and all the James
Bond films

The UK’s Music Industry

The UK’s music production sector has three main strengths which
have proven irresistible to international film and television producers:
Superb technical facilities
Top quality recording engineers
World class musicians, orchestras, songwriters and composers.

Recording Facilities

It’s an undisputed fact that the UK’s studios are among the best
equipped anywhere. In many cases, they are less expensive than
elsewhere, too.

Recording Engineers

Talented, efficient and professional, British recording engineers have
an excellent reputation throughout the world. No wonder overseas
companies looking to record scores frequently return to the UK and
ask for the services of specific engineers.

Musicians

The UK has a pool of talented orchestras, individual musicians,
songwriters and composers who together cover every style of music
imaginable.

Orchestras

Some of the world’s finest orchestras can be found in the UK. Like
many people, you may associate the London Philharmonic Orchestra,
the London Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
with the concert hall, but these orchestras, together with many others,
are regularly involved in film recording. What’s more, individual
members of these orchestras are often booked by contractors for
soundtrack session work.
Both orchestral players and individual session musicians in the UK are
universally recognized as consummate professionals. They can walk
into a recording studio and play a new score without the need for
hours of rehearsal. The value of such professionalism to a film or TV
producer who wants his/her soundtrack on time and within budget
hardly needs mentioning!

Composers

Given the UK’s wide range of award-winning composers (which
includes David Arnold, John Barry, Anne Dudley, Rachel Portman and
Stephen Warbeck), it should come as no surprise to learn that an
impressive number of film scores have been written and/or recorded
in Britain, even though some of the films themselves were shot
elsewhere.

A comprehensive list of media composers can be obtained from
The British Academy of Composers and Songwriters (BACS).
Advice on composer agreements can be obtained from the Producers
Rights Agency. (Remember to seek independent advice, too.)

Fees for score commissioning vary according to the length of music
needed, the status of the composer and the rights to be acquired.
When budgeting for the composition element of a score, you must
take into account the cost of arranging and copying, attendance
sessions, and the time the composer may be asked to put in during
the editing process.

Recording Sessions and Cost Efficiency

The proper organisation of recording sessions can save you, the
producer, time and money.

The music production industry works to an agreement called the
Musicians’ Union Agreement, which allows some degree of flexibility
when it comes to booking session-time. In other words, you won’t find
yourself automatically committed to a three-hour session unless you
want to be.

If you want the right to exploit a music soundtrack in all media
throughout the world in perpetuity and to release a commercial record,
you can engage musicians under the ‘combined use fee’. In effect, this
amounts to a ‘buy out’, but you should seek advice if you intend to use
extracts of the score in related programmes or products.
Under the ‘combined use fee’, session fees are divided into four
scales. A scale of pay is determined by multiplying the number of
musicians booked by the number of hours worked. For example, 30
musicians booked for three four-hour sessions equals 360 hours of
employment. In this case, Scale two rates would apply, which give a
discount of over 25% on the basic hourly rate.

For more information about musician fees and working practices,
contact the Musicians’ Union. Alternatively, contact the Producers
Alliance for Cinema and Television (PACT).

Music Contractors

The UK’s many experienced music contractors (also known as
fixers or bookers) are the ideal people to advise you about the
practicalities of arranging and booking musicians.

They can:
-Help you budget for the recording and organise the sessions
in a cost effective manner
-Help with finding the best-priced studios for the job (try and
book the dates you want as early as possible)
-Book the musicians
-Arrange completion and signature of the musicians’ consent
forms
-Pay the session fees
-Musicians usually expect to be paid on the day of a session
so you will have to pay the contractor up front.

Music producers, supervisors & copyright consultants

A good music producer, supervisor and/or copyright consultant
can help to make a producer’s life easier and, in the long run,
save him/her money.

A music producer can help manage the whole music process by
assisting with the budget and other administrative business,
handling music clearance procedures, booking studios, liaising
with thecomposer and overseeing and/or producing the sessions.

NEXT – OUR SIDE OF THE POND

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II. MEMBER COMMENT I

I’ve thought a lot about this and even though I realize the corruption
of the current RMA (for at least 20 years plus), there should be a
players conference that represents recording musicians within the
AFM whether it includes the RMA or not.

I feel that it has to be structured in a radically different way and
policed by AFM to represent the best interests of the national
recording membership. But with AFM officers and IEB in alliance
with RMA, this will never happen until they’re out of office.

This will only happen when there is NO MORE recording work
left in LA on contract or so little that the disenfranchised musicians
in LA revolt and force the AFM to restructure the RMA to
produce contracts that support work. We’re getting closer to this.

The RMA should have amongst its conference representatives from
Locals that do recording work. The officers of the RMA should be
elected by RMA chapters AND recording committees within the Locals.
It should be overseen by an arbitrator outside of AFM so the best
contracts are produced for the general union and not always skewered
to only represent keeping a contract that is non globally competitive 
(motion picture) at the expense of all other contracts. The independent
arbitrator could be funded through AFM by dropping a member of the
IEB and the resulting salary available.

I certainly realized a few years ago that it didn’t matter to the AFM/IEB
how many graphs and Powerpoint presentations that you showed them
concerning the direction of the video game industry recording revenue 
under AFM contract since 2010. It didn’t matter that in 5 years they lost
this Industry when we were moving forward so nicely prior to 2010 with
capturing the most important recording venue available.

Eventually, a revolt either by election or not will have to happen. I’ll be
there to support this, believe me. It’s only that after years of trying, I
realize that nothing can be done until this happens in LA.

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III ASMAC UPCOMING FUNCTIONS

ASMAC “FIRST WEDNESDAYS”

CONCEIVING  AN ORIGINAL ARRANGEMENT
featuring
Elliot Deutsch and Patrick Williams
 
Wednesday April 6, 2016   7:00 p.m.- 10:00 p.m.
Free Event for members of Local 47 and ASMAC, $10 for guests
AFM Local 47, 817 Vine St. Hollywood CA 90038

Elliot Deutsch is a rising star among young arrangers in Los Angeles.
Patrick Williams is one of the most accomplished and in-demand arrangers today.

They will each present an arrangement that they have written and recorded and talk about their process. Come and learn how an accomplished arranger conceives of his or her unique vision through the scope of a familiar tune.

Patrick Williams
Having composed the music for over 65 feature films, 100 television films, 25 television series, as well as 19 albums and 30 concert works, Patrick Williams has established himself as one of the most accomplished and prolific composers in the music industry today. He has received four Emmy awards with twenty-two nominations and two Grammy awards with twenty-one nominations, two of which come from his latest release, “Home Suite Home”.  He has also been nominated for both an Academy Award and the Pulitzer Prize in music. He is a recipient of the Richard Kirk Award from BMI and the Golden Score Award from the American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers.

Born in Missouri, Williams grew up in Connecticut and received a degree in history from Duke University. His first love, however, was always music, and when he went on to Columbia to study music composition and conducting, his passion became his profession. He quickly became busy as an arranger in New York, and then in 1968, he moved to California to pursue work in the film and television industry while continuing to write and arrange jazz albums. Proficiency in composing for symphony orchestras as well as jazz bands has offered Williams an opportunity to create a wide variety of works. Among his critically acclaimed compositions are An American Concerto, a piece featuring a jazz quartet and symphony orchestra, for which he received a 1977 Pullitzer Prize nomination; Gulliver, featuring a symphony orchestra with narrator, for which he received a Grammy nomination (narration by Larry Gelbart and performed by Sir John Gielgud); Suite Memories, which features a solo trombone with symphony orchestra and won a Grammy award; Theme for Earth Day, an overture, recorded by the Boston Pops; Spring Wings, a double concerto written by saxophonist Gerry Mulligan and pianist Dave Grusin with symphony orchestra; Romances, a concerto for jazz saxophonist Tom Scott and orchestra; A Concerto in Swing for big band and clarinet, which was dedicated to and premiered by Eddie Daniels; Adagio for Orchestra composed in 2004; and August composed in 2005. He recently completed a ballet, “Ziji”, with choreographer Edgar Zendejas to honor the 60th Anniversary of the College of the Fine Arts at the University of Utah.

Some of Williams’ big band recordings are considered classics of contemporary big band instrumentals, such as Threshold for which he received a Grammy in 1974; Too Hip for the Room, for which he received a Grammy nomination in 1983; Tenth Avenue which received a Grammy nomination in 1987 and Sinatraland, a big band tribute to Frank Sinatra for which he received a Grammy nomination in 1998. In 2006, he received two Grammy nominations for the album Elevation with Tom Scott and Eddie Daniels.In September 2001, he won an Emmy for his song, “A Dream That Only I Can Know,” from the film, Yesterday’s Children. In 2002, he received an Emmy nomination for his score for “We Were The Mulvaneys” and a Grammy nomination for “The Theme from Blonde” from the sountrack album for the TV miniseries Blonde, a portrait of Marilyn Monroe. In 1992, Williams won the Emmy for the mini-series “Jewels”. He has composed and arranged themes and scores for television series including The Streets of San Francisco, Lou Grant, The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd, the Mary Tyler Moore Show, the Bob Newhart Show, Columbo, Slap Maxwell, The Tony Randall Show, and the Magician. Recent television projects include Hercules, starring Sean Astin, The Perfect Husband: The Laci Peterson Story; When Angels Come To Town and Finding John Christmas starring Peter Falk; James Patterson’s First to Die; Power and Beauty;The Thin Blue Lie; The Three Stooges with Michael Chiklis and A Cooler Climate starring Sally Field and Judy Davis. Of the 65 plus films Williams has scored in his career, a few include Breaking Away, for which he received a 1978 Oscar nomination; All of Me, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, Swing Shift, Cuba, Violet’s Are Blue, Casey’s Shadow, The Cutting Edge, Cry-Baby, and The Glass Harp. Williams is also an accomplished arranger with extensive credits. The album, For Ella featuring Patti Austin, which he co-produced and arranged, was nominated for a 2003 Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal album. He was chosen by Frank Sinatra to act as Musical Director/ Arranger- Conductor for his final studio recordings, Duets and Duets II. He has arranged recordings for Michael Bublé, Jack Jones, Andrea Bocelli, Paul Anka, Peter Cincotti, Natalie Cole, Neil Diamond, Gloria Estefan, Michael Feinstein, Vince Gill, Amy Grant, Thomas Hampson, Barry Hay, Monica Mancini, Barry Manilow, Bette Midler, John Pizzarelli, Brian Setzer, Barbara Streisand, Traincha, and Russell Watson.

Williams has been a leader in the music education field for many years, holding posts as Visiting Professor and Composer in Residence at the University of Utah and the University of Colorado, which awarded him an Honorary Doctoral Degree. He has performed and/or lectured at many colleges including Berkeley College of Music, Cornell University, Duke University, Indiana University, Texas Christian University, (1993 Green Honors Professor), UCLA, USC, and Yale University. In May 2001. he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Duke University. He served as Artistic Director of the Henry Mancini Institute from 2001 to 2006.


Elliot Deutsch is a busy composer and arranger of large ensemble jazz music. In its tenth year of performing, the Elliot Deutsch Big Band has released two albums, played in every major jazz venue in Los Angeles, and hosted an impressive list of guest stars including Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Ron Stout, and many others.  Deutsch has written for Arturo Sandoval, Bill Watrous, Jane Monheit, Take 6, Terence Blanchard, and many others. In 2015, Deutsch arranged several songs for the Kennedy Center Gala “It Don’t Mean a Thing… A Celebration of Swing” under the musical direction of John Clayton.  His compositions and arrangements are published by Alfred and Walrus Music.
 
Deutsch is also a busy educator, serving on the faculties of Cal Poly Pomona and Long Beach City College. Deutsch has written numerous commissions for school jazz bands including USC, Caltech, CSULB, Cal Poly Pomona, Esperanza High School, and many others. He lectured on arranging for Middle School Jazz Ensemble at the 2016 Jazz Educators Network National Conference.
Wednesday April 6, 2016 – 7 PM 

$10 for Guests and Students
FREE for ASMAC & Local 47 members

Free parking.

Meet-up & Check-in: 7:00-7:30 PM.
Program: 7:30-10:00 PM.
 
PLEASE NOTE LOCATION:
AFM Local 47 – Auditorium
817 Vine St.
Hollywood, CA 90038

* ASMAC Members who would like to share music at a
FIRST WEDNESDAYS event,
Contact [email protected]  Attn: Milton Nelson
 
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ASMAC LUNCHEON

ASMAC Luncheon with
Special Guest Dave Black of Alfred Music

@ Catalina’s Jazz Club 
Wed., April 20, 2016 @ 11:30am

ASMAC LUNCHEON WELCOMES
Percussionist/composer/author 
Dave Black
April 20, 2016 – 11:30AM
@ Catalina’s in Hollywood

 
Percussionist, composer, and author, Dave Black, received his Bachelor of Music in percussion performance from California State University, Northridge. He has traveled around the world with a variety of entertainers and shows, performing and recording with such artists as Alan King, Robert Merrill, June Allyson, Anita O’Day, Pete Jolly, Frankie Capp, Gordon Brisker, Kim Richmond, Victor Lewis, Jerry Hey, and Steve Huffsteter.

A seasoned professional in this aspect of our business, Dave will share his thoughts about the “nuts and bolts” and current challenges in educational music publishing. What are the advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing? How do you research which publishers might be right for you? How best to submit your music for publication? How must composers participate in the marketing of their music. Perhaps you need a distributor and not a publisher? What is the future of E-books? What are the problems of digital sharing of music materials? Bring a pencil and take notes!

A prolific composer and arranger, more than 60 of his compositions and arrangements have been published by most of the major publishers, many of which have been recorded. Mr. Black has written with, and for the bands of Louie Bellson, Sammy Nestico, Bill Watrous, Bobby Shew, Ed Shaughnessy, Gordon Brisker and the C.S.U., Northridge Jazz Ensemble.

He has been the recipient of numerous awards and commissions, including 26 consecutive ASCAP Popular Composer Awards, two Grammy participation/nomination certificates–one for his performance contribution on Anita O’Day’s Grammy®-nominated album In a Mellow Tone, and the other for his contribution as album-track composer on Louie Bellson’s Grammy®-nominated album Airmail Special. He is also the recipient of the 2012 Percussive Arts Society President’s Industry Award, a Modern Drummer Readers Poll award (best drum book), two Drum! Magazine Drummie! awards (best drum book), and a certified Gold Record award for the sale of more than 500,000 copies of Alfred’s Drum Method, Book 1. In addition, many of his compositions have been used as source/background music on numerous TV shows including All My Children, Coach, The Drew Carey Show, General Hospital, Ellen, Grace Under Fire, Nightline, Roseanne and Good Morning America. In addition, he co-wrote the “Final Rudimental Solo” (from Alfred’s Drum Method, Book 2) featured in the 20th-Century Fox hit movie, Drumline.

He presently serves as Vice President and Editor-in-Chief, School and Pop Publications, for Alfred Music Publishing Company.

Host:  Elliot Deutsch

Elliot Deutsch is a busy composer and arranger of large ensemble jazz music. In its tenth year of performing, the Elliot Deutsch Big Band has released two albums, played in every major jazz venue in Los Angeles, and hosted an impressive list of guest stars including Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Ron Stout, and many others.  Deutsch has written for Arturo Sandoval, Bill Watrous, Jane Monheit, Take 6, Terence Blanchard, and many others. In 2015, Deutsch arranged several songs for the Kennedy Center Gala “It Don’t Mean a Thing… A Celebration of Swing” under the musical direction of John Clayton.  His compositions and arrangements are published by Alfred and Walrus Music.
___________
Check out the ASMAC website – www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview DVD’s in the ASMAC store (Van Alexander, Ray Charles, Johnny Mandel, Jorge Calandrelli, Bill Ross, Jack Feierman, Sammy Nestico and more), to download ASMAC luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 
Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL

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IV. EVENTS

DEAN AND RICHARD

DEAN AND RICHARD are now playing every third Friday
at Culver City Elks 7:30pm-10;30pm,
11160 Washington Pl.
Culver City, 90232
310-839-8891

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LA WINDS JAZZ KATS 584

NO COVER, NO MINIMUM.
Every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at Viva Cantina
7:30-10:00.
900 Riverside Drive, Burbank.

Free parking across the street at Pickwick Bowl.
Come hear your favorite charts played the way they
should be.

We are in the back room called the Trailside Room.

Come on down. Guaranteed to swing.

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NEW RUSS GARCIA BOOK

Russell Garcia:   Russell wrote his auto-biography
“I Have Hundreds Of Stories, Some Of Them True”  
before he passed away at age 95 in New Zealand,
on 20 Nov 2011.  The book is out now.

Russell was a world renowned composer-arranger-conductor
who wrote music for over 100 films.  He is known for his
innovative music score for the film “Time Machine”.  Garcia
is also known in both the TV and recording fields and has
composed music for countless TV shows such as, Rawhide,
Twilight Zone, Laredo, The Virginian.  He has recorded many
CDs  in his own right, as well as with stars such as, Louis
Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Vic Damone, Judy Garland,
Oscar Peterson, Julie London, to name a few.  

Garcia has also written 2 best-selling text books The Professional
Arranger-Composer “ Book I and Book II, which have been translated
into 6 languages.  He is known also for his symphonic and classical
works which have been performed by the New Zealand Symphony,
Munich Symphony, the Vienna Symphony, plus countless Radio
Symphony Orchestras throughout Europe.  He was often a guest
lecturer at many universities around the world on Symphonic
Composition Techniques.  Russell and his wife Gina made New
Zealand their home in 1971 while continuing to work in the Music
and Film Industry.  He was awarded the Queens Service Medal
for his service to music in 2009.
(www.buildabetterworldproductions.com)

——————————————-

4/6/26

ASMAC PRESENTS: FIRST WEDNESDAYS


CONCEIVING  AN ORIGINAL ARRANGEMENT
Eliot Deutsch and Patrick Williams

FIRST WEDNESDAY’S
Wed. April 6, 2016 – 7:00pm
ELLIOT DEUTSCH and PATRICK WILLIAMS

 Wednesday April 6, 2016   7:00 p.m.- 10:00 p.m.
Free Event for members of Local 47 and ASMAC, $10 for guests
AFM Local 47, 817 Vine St. Hollywood CA 90038

Elliot Deutsch is a rising star among young arrangers in
Los Angeles. Patrick Williams is one of the most accomplished
and in-demand arrangers today. They will each present an
arrangement that they have written and recorded and talk
about their process. Come and learn how an accomplished
arranger conceives of his or her unique vision through the
scope of a familiar tune.

PATRICK WILLIAMS

Having composed the music for over 65 feature films,
100 television films, 25 television series, as well as 19
albums and 30 concert works, Patrick Williams has established
himself as one of the most accomplished and prolific
composers in the music industry today. He has received
four Emmy awards with twenty-two nominations and two
Grammy awards with twenty-one nominations, two of
which come from his latest release, “Home Suite Home”. 
He has also been nominated for both an Academy Award
and the Pulitzer Prize in music. He is a recipient of the
Richard Kirk Award from BMI and the Golden Score Award
from the American Society of Music Arrangers and
Composers.


Born in Missouri, Williams grew up in Connecticut and received
a degree in history from Duke University. His first love, however,
was always music, and when he went on to Columbia to study
music composition and conducting, his passion became
his profession. He quickly became busy as an arranger in New
York, and then in 1968, he moved to California to pursue work
in the film and television industry while continuing to write
and arrange jazz albums. Proficiency in composing for
symphony orchestras as well as jazz bands has offered
Williams an opportunity to create a wide variety of works.

Among his critically acclaimed compositions are An American
Concerto, a piece featuring a jazz quartet and symphony orchestra,
for which he received a 1977 Pullitzer Prize nomination; Gulliver,
featuring a symphony orchestra with narrator, for which he received a
Grammy nomination (narration by Larry Gelbart and performed by Sir
John Gielgud); Suite Memories, which features a solo trombone with
symphony orchestra and won a Grammy award; Theme for Earth Day,
an overture, recorded by the Boston Pops; Spring Wings, a double
concerto written by saxophonist Gerry Mulligan and pianist Dave
Grusin with symphony orchestra; Romances, a concerto for jazz
saxophonist Tom Scott and orchestra; A Concerto in Swing for big
band and clarinet, which was dedicated to and premiered by Eddie
Daniels; Adagio for Orchestra composed in 2004; and August
composed in 2005. He recently completed a ballet, “Ziji”, with
choreographer Edgar Zendejas to honor the 60th Anniversary of the
College of the Fine Arts at the University of Utah.

Some of Williams’ big band recordings are considered classics of
contemporary big band instrumentals, such as Threshold for which
he received a Grammy in 1974; Too Hip for the Room, for which he
received a Grammy nomination in 1983; Tenth Avenue which received
a Grammy nomination in 1987 and Sinatraland, a big band tribute to
Frank Sinatra for which he received a Grammy nomination in 1998. In
2006, he received two Grammy nominations for the album Elevation
with Tom Scott and Eddie Daniels.In September 2001, he won an
Emmy for his song, “A Dream That Only I Can Know,” from the film,
Yesterday’s Children. In 2002, he received an Emmy nomination for
his score for “We Were The Mulvaneys” and a Grammy nomination for
“The Theme from Blonde” from the sountrack album for the TV
miniseries Blonde, a portrait of Marilyn Monroe. In 1992, Williams
won the Emmy for the mini-series “Jewels”. He has composed and
arranged themes and scores for television series including The
Streets of San Francisco, Lou Grant, The Days and Nights of Molly
Dodd, the Mary Tyler Moore Show, the Bob Newhart Show, Columbo,
Slap Maxwell, The Tony Randall Show, and the Magician. Recent
television projects include Hercules, starring Sean Astin, The Perfect
Husband: The Laci Peterson Story; When Angels Come To Town and
Finding John Christmas starring Peter Falk; James Patterson’s First to
Die; Power and Beauty;The Thin Blue Lie; The Three Stooges with
Michael Chiklis and A Cooler Climate starring Sally Field and Judy
Davis. Of the 65 plus films Williams has scored in his career, a few
include Breaking Away, for which he received a 1978 Oscar
nomination; All of Me, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, Swing
Shift, Cuba, Violet’s Are Blue, Casey’s Shadow, The Cutting Edge,
Cry-Baby, and The Glass Harp. Williams is also an accomplished
arranger with extensive credits. The album, For Ella featuring Patti
Austin, which he co-produced and arranged, was nominated for a
2003 Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal album. He was chosen by Frank
Sinatra to act as Musical Director/ Arranger- Conductor for his final
studio recordings, Duets and Duets II. He has arranged recordings for
Michael Bublé, Jack Jones, Andrea Bocelli, Paul Anka, Peter Cincotti,
Natalie Cole, Neil Diamond, Gloria Estefan, Michael Feinstein, Vince
Gill, Amy Grant, Thomas Hampson, Barry Hay, Monica Mancini, Barry
Manilow, Bette Midler, John Pizzarelli, Brian Setzer, Barbara Streisand,
Traincha, and Russell Watson.

Williams has been a leader in the music education field for many
years, holding posts as Visiting Professor and Composer in Residence
at the University of Utah and the University of Colorado, which
awarded him an Honorary Doctoral Degree. He has performed and/or
lectured at many colleges including Berkeley College of Music,
Cornell University, Duke University, Indiana University, Texas
Christian University, (1993 Green Honors Professor), UCLA, USC, and
Yale University. In May 2001. he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate
of Fine Arts from Duke University. He served as Artistic Director of
the Henry Mancini Institute from 2001 to 2006.

——————-

Elliot Deutsch is a busy composer and arranger of large ensemble
jazz music. In its tenth year of performing, the Elliot Deutsch Big
Band has released two albums, played in every major jazz venue in
Los Angeles, and hosted an impressive list of guest stars including
Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Ron Stout, and many others.  Deutsch
has written for Arturo Sandoval, Bill Watrous, Jane Monheit, Take 6,
Terence Blanchard, and many others. In 2015, Deutsch arranged
several songs for the Kennedy Center Gala “It Don’t Mean a Thing… A
Celebration of Swing” under the musical direction of John Clayton. 
His compositions and arrangements are published by Alfred and
Walrus Music.


Deutsch is also a busy educator, serving on the faculties of Cal Poly
Pomona and Long Beach City College. Deutsch has written numerous
commissions for school jazz bands including USC, Caltech, CSULB,
Cal Poly Pomona, Esperanza High School, and many others. He
lectured on arranging for Middle School Jazz Ensemble at the 2016
Jazz Educators Network National Conference.

Wednesday April 6, 2016 – 7 PM 

FREE for ASMAC/Local 47 members
$10 for guests and students
Free parking.

Meet-up & Check-in: 7:00-7:30 PM.
Program: 7:30-10:00 PM.
 
PLEASE NOTE:  NEW LOCATION
AFM Local 47 – Auditorium
817 Vine St.
Hollywood, CA 90038

* ASMAC Members who would like to share music at a
FIRST WEDNESDAYS event,
Contact [email protected]  Attn: Milton Nelson

+++++++++++++++

NEXT ASMAC LUNCHEON
ASMAC LUNCHEON
Wed. April 20, 2016
11:30am – 2:00pm
CATALINA’S JAZZ CLUB
Special Guest
DAVE BLACK

Check out the ASMAC website – www.asmac.org
to see the new master class, luncheon and interview 
DVD’s in the ASMAC store, to download ASMAC
luncheon podcasts, and more!
JUST ADDED: 

Special Interview with the renowned composer/arranger 
JIMMIE HASKELL
———————————

4/6/16

Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts/ Jacqueline Suzuki & Susan Svrcek perform RAUTAVAARA Lost Landscapes

FREE ADMISSION GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS
Every FIRST & THIRD WEDNESDAY at 12:10-12:40 pm
On Wednesday MARCH 2, 2016 at 12:10-12:40 pm:
Crescenta Ensemble: Einojuhani Rautavaara’s Lost Landscapes

APRIL 6, 2016
VIOLIN RECITAL
GINASTERA Pampeana No.1, Op.16 (1947)
BRAHMS Violin Sonata No.3 in D minor, Op.108
Jacqueline Suzuki – violin
Rosa LoGiudice – piano

PLEASE NOTE:
The Glendale Noon Concerts series
now takes place in the Sanctuary at
GLENDALE CITY CHURCH
610 E. California Ave. (at Isabel St.)
Glendale, CA 91206-3701

INFO:
Please call Victoria Lucero (818-244-7241 office)
or email glendalecitychurch.org/
https://www.facebook.com/glendalecitychurch

****************************************************

UPCOMING CONCERTS in the same series:
(every FIRST & THIRD WEDNESDAY at 12:10-12:40 pm;
programs subject to change)

APRIL 20, 2016
CRESCENTA ENSEMBLE
TSCHAIKOVSKY Meditation Op.42, No.1
GINASTERA Piano Sonata No.1, Op.22
Jacqueline Suzuki – violin
Susan Svrcek – piano

CONCERT UPDATES:
http://www.glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com/

MORE FREE CONCERTS:
At the Edendale Branch Library in ECHO PARK
http://www.edendaleupclose.blogspot.com/

>>>Saturday MARCH 12. 2016 at Noon-1pm
Baroque concert featuring works by
Handel, Monteverdi, Purcell & Scarlatti
BRIAN ASAWA – countertenor
DIANA TASH – mezzo-soprano
ARTHUR OMURA – harpsichord
ALEXA PILON – Baroque cello
http://www.brianasawa.com/
http://www.dianatash.com/
http://www.arthuromura.com/

———————————————-

4/3/16

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY SYMPHONY

WHAT: James Domine, Music Director, presents the San Fernando Valley Symphony Orchestra in Concert, performing:

Domine:       Horn Concerto (Inaugural Performance) Jennifer Bliman, French horn                                

Conus:         Violin Concerto Aubree Oliverson, violinist

Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor

WHEN: Sunday, April 3, 2016, at 3:00 PM
WHERE:   Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center
27040 Malibu Hills Road, Calabasas

General admission: $25.00. Reservations and payments may be made online by accessing www.sfvsymphony.com, or by  
calling the Orchestra Box Office at 818-347-4807. For information about the Post-Concert Fundraiser at the Marmalade
Cafe in The Commons, call 818-943-7797.

———————————————-

5/15/16

LACESMA 75TH ANNIVERSARY DIAMOND JUBILEE GALA

The Los Angeles City Elementary Schools Music Association,
LACESMA, is celebrating its 75th Anniversary of promoting
elementary music education in LAUSD with a Gala Event in
the Grand Ballroom of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at
the Los Angeles Music Center on Sunday May 15, 2016.

Banquet tickets are $60.00 each and can be purchased by
going to our website at lacesmamusiced.org or by mailing
a check made out to LACESMA to: LACESMA c/o Jeanne
Mitchell, P.O. Box 361 Topanga, CA 90290.

For questions, please email us at [email protected]
At the celebration there will performances by over 100 singers
of the LACESMA Children’s Honor Chorus, some of the 2016
LACESMA Instrumental Scholarship winners, as well as a p
erformance by a celebrity TBA.

We are proud to have Gail Eichenthal, Executive Producer of
KUSC, as the emcee of the Banquet. Please help support
elementary music education in LAUSD by attending this
Gala Celebration! Click here to see the first Promotional
Video Clip of the Gala.

——————————————–

MASTER IN FLM MUSIC APPLICATIONS STILL BEING ACCEPTED

The Pacific Northwest Film Scoring Program
At The
Seattle Film Institute

is still accepting applications to the One year

Master of Music (MM) in Film Composition

Recently rated as the #4 school for film scoring education
in the world by Music School Central and the #2 school
for earning a Masters of Music degree in Film Composition

Study with program creator and lead instructor

Hummie Mann

2 Time Emmy Award Winning film composer of
“Robin Hood: Men in Tights” and featured in
Variety Magazine’s article “Leaders in Learning”

Click here to listen and watch student scores from previous years

Applications are now being accepted for the 2016
school year We offer rolling admissions – applying
early is recommended Scholarship support is
available to early applicants

================================

You can read all previous offerings at:http://www.responsible47.com

UNTIL NEXT TIME,
THE COMMITTEE FOR A MORE RESPONSIBLE LOCAL 47

 

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